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23-06-2005
  16
fashion icon
 
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So he really just revolutionized the business aspect. I mean I can't really believe he was responsible for getting all the gosh darn sloppy women in shape in terms of technique and craft. I do think it is awesome he elevated dressmaking to something higher than just an artisan's role.

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23-06-2005
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On a somewhat related subject I find it funny that I question the authenticity of the male designers who have been married throughout our history. I either wonder were their wives the masterminds behind the lines or were they in the closet with marriages for show/produce children.

But that absurd part is I'm a fashion design major (mentioned several times before on this site) and very much straight. It boggles my mind why I can't imagine they could be just like me. Boy have I been brainwashed by the Gay Mafia.

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23-06-2005
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Yes, I've always thought that women probably did his actual sewing, and he just represented the business in a whole new way. Which is pretty great, in its own right.

Straight or gay, talent is what matters. Who on earth cares who you have sex with ?

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28-04-2006
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well back in those days, men were actually the ones who does the sewing and men pretty much did everything while the women stays at home and does the whole "wife chores", I'm sure some women sewed but the majority were men........

*fast forward*
During the World Wars the men had to leave their own country for battle, leaving the women to do what they usually don't do such as working in factories, sewing blah blah blah....in which society starts to see the "some" role reversing

*present time*
now that sewing and fashion tends to be more associated with women and the fact that homosexual men tend to be more intouch with their feminine side oppose to their hetero brothers, the new breeds of male fashion designers are more likely to be homosexuals than straight.

Although society looks at fashion,sewing, and all that jazz to be more female oriented, what I thought was funny is that the equality between the sexes in the fashion industry is still unbalanced with the fact that men still dominates the fashion world, hence the fact that it "seems" to be associated with our female sisters.

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28-04-2006
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I've heard about him when I've read about Coco Chanel. Don't know that much, so thank you very much for creating this thread! I'd love to see more pictures of his work, if it is possible.

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28-04-2006
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'Spangled silk tulle was typical of Worth's work in the 1860s. For Empress Elizabeth of Austria he chose gold to be scattered over her gown. The dress's décolleté neckline, which exposes and embraces her shoulders, would be softened with tulle held lightly around her hips. The story of modern fashion began when Charles Frederick Worth, a young tailor, arrived at the court of Napoleon III. In his bid to re-estabilish Paris as the centre of fashionable life, the Emperor stimulated the luxury business and his wife Eugénie patronized it in fabulous style. Worth drew on the history of costume to create lavish, expensive gowns which raised dressmaking to a new level called haute couture.' (The Fashion Book)

Obviously he is the one who established the form of MODERN haute couture from a business perspective which had significant impacts on the development of the fashion industry.

pic from http://www.artunframed.com/winterhalter.htm
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28-04-2006
  22
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Gorgeous pic!

Thanks for the photo, sabrinamac!

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28-04-2006
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Yeah I beleive the story was Coco Chanel attended a party that was in honour of Charles Worth and she wore all black from head to toe and charles said something like (you look like you're in mourning) and she replied back (I am mourning....for your career)

what a biotch....lolz

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29-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dashphire
Yeah I beleive the story was Coco Chanel attended a party that was in honour of Charles Worth and she wore all black from head to toe and charles said something like (you look like you're in mourning) and she replied back (I am mourning....for your career)

what a biotch....lolz

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29-04-2006
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^^Sounds very Coco

That last picture is heavenly! I wish I could wear that dress---it looks so well-made and light (it must have weighed a ton though). Thank you for posting!

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Last edited by Whitelinen; 29-04-2006 at 08:14 AM.
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29-04-2006
  26
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Dashphire
Quote:
Yeah I beleive the story was Coco Chanel attended a party that was in honour of Charles Worth and she wore all black from head to toe and charles said something like (you look like you're in mourning) and she replied back (I am mourning....for your career)
I believe the incident happened with Paul Poiret in the early 20's who was the going flavour at the time, Worth already having passed away long before. Great story though.

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29-04-2006
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^Oh yes, I remember reading about their arguments from Coco's autobiography.

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20-10-2006
  28
far from home...
 
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Worth Deep Iris Coupe des Velours Silk Chiffon Gown
French, circa 1896
Serpentine floral and foliate motif, the fitted bodice with applique banded purple dyed Chantilly lace trimming the neckline and overlaying sleeve cap concluding in steel bead tassels front and back, embroidered with sequin, seed and faceted beads, ecru Alencon lace bib, band collar, glove length balloon sleeve with elbow shaped cuff, pleated chiffon cummerbund waist with passementarie embroidered frog medallion at center back with silk braid ball and seed bead tassles, the trained bell-shaped bustle skirt with hip stitched pleats, double banded Chantilly lace inserted with applique at hem, rouched chiffon trimming on hem of lilac crepe back satin underskirt, size 8, labeled: C.Worth and numbered 85854.
Estimate: $10,000-12,000

This gown was given to the elderly consignor by her great aunt, a textile teacher on the West Coast, who in turn was given it by the mother of one of her pupils for use in a lesson. The information that accompanied the gown was that it belonged to Louisa Morgan Satterlee, the eldest daughter of of J. Pierpoint Morgan. What is known apart from the fact that she regularly travelled to Paris to be fitted by Worth, is that Louisa was born on March 10, 1866 and therefore she would have been in her early 30's when wearing the gown. In addition she is described as tall and rather large boned. Both facts are consistent with the style and size of this beautiful design.

doylenewyork.com


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File Type: jpg worthax2.jpg (54.8 KB, 26 views)
File Type: jpg 481279tp9.jpg (167.8 KB, 27 views)

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Last edited by DosViolines; 20-10-2006 at 06:05 PM.
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23-10-2006
  29
chaos reigns
 
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the color and detail on the above dress is 2die4!

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23-10-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ultramarine
the color and detail on the above dress is 2die4!
I agree. It looks heavenly.

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