How to Join
the Fashion Spot / All Things Vintage / History of Style : a remembrance of things past
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
02-05-2007
  91
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
Lovely posts, WhiteLinen!

I adore that he sent the fans as little presents! Now that would be a fashion statement to bring back... the elegant and mysterious fan!

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
 
03-05-2007
  92
....ITMFA....
 
Luxury's Lap's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Mpls, MN, US Horoscope: Leo
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingElse
I adore that he sent the fans as little presents! Now that would be a fashion statement to bring back... the elegant and mysterious fan!
I bought a few sandalwood fans from pearl river mart a few years ago, intending to use them in the summer, but I haven't had the nerve yet. People think I'm weird enough!

__________________
“It is absurd to divide people into good & bad. People are either charming or tedious.”
— Oscar Wilde

www.flickr.com/jstreitdesign/
  Reply With Quote
03-05-2007
  93
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 22,703
This is a great thread thanks to everyone that posted the great pictures and articles.


Last edited by Miss Dalloway; 03-05-2007 at 03:35 PM.
  Reply With Quote
03-05-2007
  94
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
^ Oh I love sandalwood fans! I use them in the sauna to really heat things up. Eventually, they fall apart, but it really works. I know, it's not the same as 'being seen in public with a fan'... I have seen people use them when it's hot - sure is eco-friendly, no? I researched the history of fans last night, and it really is an interesting item. Fans have been in use for thousands of years in most cultures around the world. Made of paper, cloth, wood, feathers... for anyone who wants to be noticed, a fan sure would catch my attention!

I think they're cool.

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
11-05-2007
  95
The future is stupid
 
MissMagAddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 25,312
Poiret: King of Fashion at the Met Video

__________________
Love is what you want.

  Reply With Quote
11-05-2007
  96
fashion icon
 
justlooking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: peter pan land
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,234
gorgeous thread. thanks for compiling so many pictures.

__________________
┃★ tFS 50-BOOK CHALLENGE ★┃
  Reply With Quote
11-05-2007
  97
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
More - I can't resist! Sorry but I can't seem to get rid of the white boxes on the images.









vintagetextile.com . lecostumeatraverslessiecles.chez-alice.fr . wadsworthatheneum.org

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by SomethingElse; 11-05-2007 at 09:29 PM.
  Reply With Quote
12-05-2007
  98
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517

c. 1908


c. 1910


c. 1926

beverleybirks.com

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
12-05-2007
  99
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
nytimes

Quote:
May 11, 2007
Art Review | 'Poiret: King of Fashion'
What to Wear to a Revolution


Anna Marie Kellen/Galliera, Musee de la Mode de la Ville de Paris

Paul Poiret’s 1905 Révérend Coat, embellished with Chinese roundels.

By ROBERTA SMITH

“Poiret: King of Fashion,” the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s sumptuous survey of the designs of the French couturier Paul Poiret (1879-1944), will transform your understanding of the origin of modern fashion. Its radiant hand-painted silk backdrops may also increase your appreciation of the art of set design; they magically create an immersive beauty out of almost nothing.

Poiret’s achievement is not as visible today as that of Coco Chanel, who built on some of his ideas and discarded others. His fashion house closed in 1929, and he spent his remaining years impoverished. But Poiret was for a while a revolutionary in revolutionary times and also a canny impresario. His radically streamlined, unstructured, often stridently colored clothes freed women from corsets while evoking exotic, non-Western cultures and a fierce disregard for social convention.

He introduced these corset-free garments in 1906, the year before Picasso committed his decidedly uninhibited (and unstaid) “Demoiselles d’Avignon” to canvas. But with his love of the exotic, his brilliant use of color and pattern, and his penchant for simplified, almost rudimentary form, Poiret most resembles Matisse.

Poiret functioned as a kind of one-man cultural scene. He collected art, gave lavish costume parties and made astute use of the press while laying the groundwork for fashion design as a modern art and a modern business. His clients included Sarah Bernhardt, Nancy Cunard, Isadora Duncan, Colette and Helena Rubinstein. Man Ray photographed Peggy Guggenheim in a Poiret gown and turban. Edward Steichen’s first fashion photographs were taken of models in Poiret’s atelier.

He was the first designer to understand the value of designing for well-known actresses both onstage and off. He was also the first to create his own line of perfume, named Rosine, for his eldest daughter, and the first to open an interior design store, Atelier Martine, named for his second daughter but inspired by the Weiner Werkstätte. His innovations included the chemise, harem pants and pantaloons and the popular lampshade skirt. When he visited the United States in 1913, he found himself called the king of fashion and discovered the underside of modern fashion success: His lampshade skirt was being copied far and wide.

Organized by Harold Koda and Andrew Bolton, who are curator in charge and curator of the Met’s Costume Institute, “Poiret: King of Fashion” conveys quite a bit of his complex genius and his contradictory relationship with modernity. It displays 50 garments on mannequins (by Beyond Design) whose ovoid faces and cryptic features evoke Brancusi and Modigliani. The silk backdrops, which are the work of Jean-Hugues de Chatillon, a French set designer who served as the exhibition’s creative consultant, accent the show’s spaciousness with indelibly Parisian vistas of leafy parks, chic theaters and luxurious drawing rooms. All told you may have the sensation of drifting through a series of extraordinarily beautiful fashion illustrations, an art that Poiret cultivated to his advantage.

Poiret’s liberation of the female body was in part inspired by the gamine build and independent spirit of his wife and muse, Denise, whom he married in 1905. In other ways it was born of necessity. Although he was initiated into the couturier business between 1898 and 1903, working as a designer for Jacques Doucet and then the House of Worth, Poiret never trained in the exacting crafts of couture tailoring or dressmaking.

His design ideas began with the flat, rectangle of the fabric itself, as did the Japanese kimonos and North African caftans he admired. They then evolved through draping, not tailoring, into garments with a minimum of seams that pretty much hung from the shoulders.

Poiret drew from a broad range of sources. Early in the show there is a trio of nightgowns, based on the Classical Greek gown known as the chiton, that are precursors to the 1950s negligee and the early 21st-century socialite party dress. To one side of these are two white high-waisted dresses that hark back to the severe yet demure gowns of post-Revolution France, displayed with an Atelier Martine chair that has bubbly hand-painted fabric.

Nearby is evidence of Poiret’s attraction to a more ornate form of non-Western dress: a gauzy harem outfit studded with enormous beads of turquoise celluloid that Denise might have worn to their most famous fete, “The Thousand and Second Night” costume party on June 24, 1911.

But turn around and you will see a stark simplicity that may take you aback: a gown that resembles nothing so much as a 1960s abstract painting. Wrapped gracefully around a mannequin, it has no sleeves or collar to speak of, just four broad, alternating bands of stylishly darkened red and blue.

Poiret’s best clothes were abstract in a very real sense, with a kind of self-evident structure that is a precursor of Minimalism, as well as of clothing designs as different as those of Rei Kawakubo, Hussein Chalayan and Andrea Zittel. His basic form was a cylinder, with or without sleeves attached. It appeared in his work as early as 1905 in his Révérend Coat embellished with Chinese roundels. The first garment in the show, it is worn over a white, lacy, high-necked, pinch-waisted Edwardian gown, like those Poiret designed at the beginning of his career. The sartorial conflict accents the shock of the newness of his sense of form, structure and color.

His best known and most audacious designs are a series of full-length columnar opera coats that begin in 1911 and culminate in the 1919 Paris Evening Coat, merely a swath of uncut fabric with a single seam. In a wonderful bit of exhibition magic this Möbius-like feat is demonstrated in a brief digital animation projected on a scrim that then turns transparent, revealing the actual coat behind it.

But even without digital aids you can see how his garments are built, step by step. A day coat began as a black satin jacket based on a Chinese robe. To this he added four strips of cream-colored wool jacquard striped horizontally with thin lines of brown for two cuffs, a simple folded-over collar and a slightly gathered skirt that reaches almost to the floor.

The contrast of fabrics joined in this single form is elegantly harsh, like a combination of Hudson Bay blanket and black tie. A similar contrast is drawn more closely in a jumperlike dress made of gold-lamé twill.

Poiret followed modernity only so far. By the mid 1920s Chanel was designing convenient, understated clothes for women enjoying an increased sense of physical and social freedom in the wake of World War I. But Poiret ignored the shorter skirts and trimmer lines and continued enveloping women in luxurious garments that began to look cumbersome.

To accent the contrast the curators end the show with an early version of Chanel’s little black dress, in layered chiffon with a subtly asymmetrical hem. Even though you can appreciate the importance of Poiret’s groundbreaking innovations, the Chanel is the garment whose elegance feels completely contemporary. Too bad they’re not selling copies in the gift shop.

“Poiret: King of Fashion” is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street, (212) 535-7710, through Aug. 5.


Anna Marie Kellen/Galliera, Musee de la Mode de la Ville de Paris
Paul Poiret’s 1905 Révérend Coat, embellished with Chinese roundels.


Man Ray Trust/Artists Rights Society (ARS)/ADAGP
A 1923 Man Ray photograph of Peggy Guggenheim wearing a dress by Poiret.


Photograph by the Metropolitan Museum of Art
A fancy dress costume (1911), with seafoam green silk gauze and cellulose beading.


Metropolitan Museum of Art

Pink cotton gauze neglige (1920).


Metropolitan Museum of Art

Gold lame dress (1923).


Metropolitan Museum of Art

Brown silk velvet, fuchsia silk crepe and gold metallic coiled thread applique (1919).


Metropolitan Museum of Art

Bois de Boulogne dinner dress (1919), made of multicolored printed silk with medieval scene motifs.


Metropolitan Museum of Art

La Parisienne (1925), made of navy wool broadcloth, red wool twill, ivory cotton voile and applied ribbon of ivory and blue silk satin with printed trompe l'oeil button motifs.

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
12-05-2007
  100
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
Last two images

nytimes


Quote:

Anna Marie Kellen/Metropolitan Museum of Art
Chemise dress worn by Denise Poiret, 1912.


Anna Marie Kellen /Musee de la Mode et du Textile

Evening gown worn by Denise Poiret, 1907.

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  101
V.I.P.
 
liberty33r1b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,094
REALLY REALLY GREAT PICS of the exhibition from lfi.co.uk!

I'll try to post as many as possible...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg poiret.jpg (30.1 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg poiret1.jpg (30.3 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg poiret2.jpg (37.7 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg poiret3.jpg (45.9 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg poiret4.jpg (29.3 KB, 9 views)

__________________
"he waited for other people to understand what he was doing, instead of doing what they wanted.
Balenciaga never compromised."
  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  102
V.I.P.
 
liberty33r1b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,094
more
Attached Images
File Type: jpg poiret5.jpg (40.7 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg poiret6.jpg (22.0 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg poiret7.jpg (25.6 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg poiret8.jpg (37.9 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg poiret9.jpg (37.4 KB, 6 views)

__________________
"he waited for other people to understand what he was doing, instead of doing what they wanted.
Balenciaga never compromised."
  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  103
V.I.P.
 
liberty33r1b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,094
......
Attached Images
File Type: jpg poiret10.jpg (27.1 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg poiret11.jpg (31.1 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg poiret12.jpg (32.6 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg poiret13.jpg (36.2 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg poiret15.jpg (36.7 KB, 4 views)

__________________
"he waited for other people to understand what he was doing, instead of doing what they wanted.
Balenciaga never compromised."
  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  104
V.I.P.
 
liberty33r1b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,094
con'd
Attached Images
File Type: jpg poiret16.jpg (42.8 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg poiret17.jpg (47.8 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg poiret18.jpg (34.1 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg poiret19.jpg (38.3 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg poiret22.jpg (40.4 KB, 7 views)

__________________
"he waited for other people to understand what he was doing, instead of doing what they wanted.
Balenciaga never compromised."
  Reply With Quote
13-05-2007
  105
V.I.P.
 
liberty33r1b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,094
more
Attached Images
File Type: jpg poiret24.jpg (34.4 KB, 8 views)
File Type: jpg poiret25.jpg (59.6 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg poiret26.jpg (32.1 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg poiret27.jpg (26.6 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg poiret33.jpg (36.9 KB, 5 views)

__________________
"he waited for other people to understand what he was doing, instead of doing what they wanted.
Balenciaga never compromised."
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
paul, poiret
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:38 AM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.