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29-03-2004
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Try Chanel: Her Style and her Life by Janet Wallach.

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Dress shabbily and they remember the dress; dress impeccably and they remember the woman -- Coco Chanel
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30-03-2004
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lovely pictures - she was amazing, inspiring in every way

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30-03-2004
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Quote:
Originally posted by tealady@Mar 29th, 2004 - 7:09 pm
Try Chanel: Her Style and her Life by Janet Wallach.
Thanks, I'll have to order it. I've been in every bookstore and our local library,not a book on fashion of any kind in sight.

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26-04-2004
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Join Date: Feb 2004
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hey all of you amazing fashion gods&goddesses!!
since you keep amazing me everytime you start working those topics i thouht i'd ask for your help on my spring-project. i've chosen: who was coco chanel, what has she done for fashion and women in general and what does the name CHANEL mean today?
so...i wondered if any of you have good advice? please don't give me a bunch of links even thought that's also great, i am looking for more expert information like which other designers relate their collections to her, great quotes by coco chanel, the cut, shape and colors of her clothes, etc. ok those were reallllyyy bad examples but you get the picture, right? just some inspiration to get me started. i don't want to only write about her clothes, but also a little about her as the revolutionary woman that she was... so if you can help, i'll be forever thankful and i swear to post 1000s of lovely pictures you can adore!hihi

thanks you're awesome

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26-04-2004
  20
arndom
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
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I think Junya Watanabe made an ala "Chanel" fw colletion last year with cute bows. If I am not wrong Yohji Yamamoto also made a retro collection with a lot of tweed, inspired by Chanel few years ago.

There was an exhibition in Antwerp 2 or 3 years ago during the "fashion marathon" :-) and it was called "2 women" about Coco Chanel and Rei Kawakubo.

Good luck:-)

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27-04-2004
  21
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Join Date: Mar 2004
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this is my first post in this forum, and i am working on my research paper today and the topic is Coco Chanel, i wonder would anyone gimme some advice of my paper?

P.S.: i am an international student who is studying in MA and my english is not very well.



Coco Chanel
by pandayu

Chanel, which represents feminine freedom, also means female fashion and perfume, emancipation and casual feminine allure. Chanel’s design is a success; it is a revolution in the fashion generation. It was founded by Coco Chanel. The “French designer, creator of the little black dress, can also take the credit for popularizing slacks, tailors suits, and short hair style in women’s fashion”(http://artandculture.com/cgi-bin/Web.../artist?id=356). As time goes by, her design has never faded away; in fact, it has evolved from generation to generation.

Coco, Gabrielle Bonheur Chanel was born on August 19, 1883 and died on January 10, 1971. She was born in Saumur, Southern France and decided to open her first boutique – Chanel on 1913 in Paris. Coco was not born in a good family, her father disappeared while she was five and her mother died when she was only 6. And therefore, she and her sister grow up in orphanage. In Madsen’s CHANEL A Woman of Her Own, “Coco and her sister went on the first class train to Paris… with her practically penniless purse and never ever returned to orphanage again”(18).

At the beginning of 20th century, women’s clothes were fussy and over decorated; these dresses were usually with very long train attached to the bodice. Besides, women always wore some big deeper sitting hats and very costly jewelry whole day outside.

Chanel’s first ambition was to be a singer, Coco – is she used to introduce herself to customer in the bars. Afterward, she met her boyfriend and get her rid of singer career, and help her to set up her first boutique in Paris on 1913. Coco truly believed that women should move much more freely and she also claimed that jewelry insurance is too expensive to afford. Therefore, her fashion revolution is begun, CHANEL the couturier at work stated “her fake jewelry was made by amethysts, topaz and aquamarine. There were cut flat and set in silver and gold metal” (De La Haye 53). She also bought freedom to all the women; according to the website of Woman History, “her mannish clothes, and adopted these more comfortable fashions which other women also find liberating” (http://womenhistory.about.com/librar...m?terms=chanel). Of course, there was lots of Chanel copied products existed during those period, and which sold in very cheap prices; Coco was flattered that her style was popular and widely copied.

During the Great Depression, lots of orders for luxury clothing had been cancelled. And Chanel is involved also, but Chanel’s designs still attracted lots of celebrities, which kept her designs famous. Thus, website of About addresses, “Chanel no. 5 – the most profitable product of Chanel boutiques” (http://womenhistory.about.com/librar...m?terms=chanel). This is the first perfume that all brand names boutiques ever released. And nowadays people still admire this perfume a lot and even claim Chanel no.5 is the most classical and remarkable perfume in the 20th century.

In the War World II, according to De la Hayes’s CHANEL the couturier at work, “Chanel decided to close all her boutiques; she stated that was no time for fashion, but she was still selling her perfumes” (83). When Paris was liberated in 1944 she went to Switzerland and did not return for another ten years. Another significant fashion designer – Christian Dior, was revealed in the “New Look” designs to the world.

Men imposed how women should dress by 1950s; Chanel decided to work again to against the “New Look”. Bond’s 20th Century Fashion mentions “she strongly ridiculing the current styles of the time with their boned bodices and tight waists as retrograde and unsuited to the modern world” (157). She even stated that men dressed women badly because they scorn them. The more Dior’s star gained ascendancy, the more Chanel’s sank into obscurity, and Coco understood that. On 1953, she finally decided to work again, and all her boutiques were re-opened next year. However, most media was icy comment about Chanel’s returned; some even criticized that “she had learnt nothing in these fifteen years” from CHANEL and her world (Charles-Roux 232). Her designs were blamed once again repeated what she had done in the 30s. Moreover, her age had been criticized and her ability had been doubted also.

Notwithstanding her designs did not fascinate by most Europeans, her designs caught Americans’ attentions and caught Europeans attentions again as well. Bond’s 20th Century Fashion states “American women were voting in vast numbers for the clothes of a designer whom a knowingly publicly was calling “Coco”” (233). Most of her celebrities’ clients like: Diane Vreeland, Grace Kelly, and Elizabeth Taylor, whom had dressed in Chanel by 30s, had dressed in Chanel again by 50s. Therefore, Chanel once more undisputed leader of fashion. Chanel continued to work with fashion right up until her death on January 10, 1977.

In conclusion, Chanel, who gave the world a new definition of fashion for women, was one of the leaders in fashion and will continue to dominate fashion in the future. Her fashion legend and their effects will and must go on in the future. No matter how the media criticized her designs, no matter how old she was, she still tried her best. No doubt, the most influential designer of the 20th century is Coco Chanel.

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20-10-2006
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Chanel Blue Silk Ombre Fringe Evening Dress and Boa
French, 1926
Of blue silk crepe georgette, the sleeveless tunic length chemise with 17 inch long pale to indigo blue ombreed fringe at hip height hem, the boa with same fringe sewn to gently curved picot edged crepe georgette panel 68 x 5 inches, size 6, no label.
See Chanel, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2005 pp.186-187 and Chanel, Jean Leymarie, Rizzoli 1987, p.99 for Edward Steichen photograph of Marion Morehouse in this dress.
Sold for $42,000


doylenewyork.com



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20-10-2006
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Chanel Evening Dress French
circa 1930, The tubular torso of overlapping black sequins, sewn with crisscrossed front straps, the full skirt of black tulle overlaid and alternating with sequined pendant bands.
Sold for $16,450

doylenewyork.com

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20-10-2006
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Day dress, ca. 1924
Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Wool
Irene Lewisohn Bequest, 1975 (1975.7)

Particularly known for her innovative sportswear designs, Chanel used knits, such as jersey or knit tweed, to great advantage. Here, in this early example, she has created a dress that is both unmistakably stylish and completely practical with elements of construction that serve both decorative and functional purposes. A dress made of supple knitted fabric like this would not require much seaming to achieve a comfortable fit, but here the seams also flatter, emphasizing the slim verticality of the design. Even the braided self-fabric trim serves as button loops at the center front and sleeve cuffs. While the overall design is elegant, Chanel has also created a dress that slips over the head like the comfortable sweaters she first sold in Deauville.

metmuseum.org

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20-10-2006
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Evening dress, ca. 1926–27
Attributed to Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Silk, metallic threads, sequins
Gift of Mrs. Georges Gudefin, 1965 (C.I.65.47.2a,b)


In addition to her revolutionary knit sportswear innovations, Chanel's evening wear from the 1920s gave the illusion of metal metamorphosed into supple knits with her use of metallic lace, lavish embroidery, and beading. The exquisite workmanship was executed by Chanel's own embroidery workshop. This example features metallic lace and sequins applied in tightly overlapping rows. The ornament of the dress, in both pattern and color palette, resembles the Asian lacquered screens which the designer loved and collected.


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20-10-2006
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Evening coat, ca. 1927
Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Silk, metallic thread
Purchase, Irene Lewisohn Bequest and Catherine Breyer Von Bomel Foundation, Hoechst Fiber Industries, and Chauncy Stillman Gifts, 1984 (1984.30)

The convergence of Art Deco line, the modernist impulse to facilitate pure form, and japonisme's potential to offer a vocabulary of untailored wrapping shapes was more than fortuitous. Chanel uses a French ombré textile with pattern sources from the Japanese kimono, but brings to it the ethos of chaste minimalism. As Western fashion designers discovered from the East that untailored lengths of fabric could constitute modern dress, the cylinder and the textile plane became the new forms for apparel.
metmuseum.org
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20-10-2006
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Day ensemble, ca. 1927
Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Silk, wool, metal
Purchase, The New-York Historical Society by Exchange Fund, 1984 (1984.28a-c)


This ensemble represents the "little black dress," one of Chanel's most popular and enduring contributions to women's fashion. In all of its layered details, a simple material, wool jersey, becomes elegant through superior tailoring technique. Couture details such as seam binding, carefully arranged pleats, the finely finished hem of the skirt, and hand-sewn belt make this ensemble an example of Chanel's characteristic poverty de luxe, an expensive interpretation of a simple design made of modest materials. Chanel appropriated tailoring details from riding habits, men's wear, and service uniforms in her quest to reduce and refine women's clothing to its simplest and most elegant.

metmuseum.org

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File Type: jpg hb198428acav1yu7.jpg (108.0 KB, 23 views)

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20-10-2006
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Day ensemble, ca. 1927
Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Silk, wool
Isabel Shults Fund, 1984 (1984.31a-c)

Chanel excelled at soft tailoring. This particular coat-and-dress ensemble blends dressmaker techniques with the definite finishes of the tailor. The dress hem and appliqués of chiffon on the jacket have been carefully cut to follow the floral pattern of the textile. The fabric is reinforced with ornamental overstitching in a manner that, while appearing to be entirely decorative, also provides structural reinforcement. This soft tailoring became the token of the Chanel suit in the designer's sustained evolution until her death in 1971.

metmuseum.org

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20-10-2006
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Evening ensemble, 1936
Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Ivory silk lace with ivory silk tulle
Gift of Mrs. Stephen M. Kellen, 1978 (1978.165.16a,b)

Off-white had been in fashion since the late 1920s, popularized by an adverse reaction to the use of black for daytime, afternoon, and evening wear, and petitioned for early evening by members of the international elite, most prominently Daisy Fellowes. Mrs. Fellowes claimed that her adoration for the pale hue resonated in the elegance and modernism of muslin Directoire-era empire gowns. In the French department store, off-white was considered a perfect compromise between the stark, formal white of evening wear and the muted hues of 1930s daytime garb.


Though Coco Chanel's most famous incarnation of the early twentieth century was her celebrated wool jersey recreational separates costume, the couturière certainly appreciated the value of elegant couture stitching and refined design for evening wear. While other Parisian houses and American department stores were creating ankle-length 1930s sheaths for the early evening, Chanel seemed disinterested in the more formalistic etiquette of dress; her designs were limited to daytime or sportswear dresses and suits, which inevitably reached mid-calf length, or long, streamlined evening gowns that draped over a slim silhouette and sometimes included a brief train at back.


This evening ensemble is an exception to Chanel's unspoken rule. While the two-piece garment dates too early in Chanel's oeuvre to be designated a cocktail ensemble, it falls appropriately to above floor-length and includes a removable matching evening jacket with a modest neckline and sleeves. The transformative qualities of this ensemble were characteristic for cocktail suits of the 1930s; even at the couture level, the removable jacket allowed a smooth, easy transition between early evening clothing and garments intended for late-night soirées. The ensemble is composed of silk net that has been treated in a labor-intensive manner with ruffles shirred in, set by heat, and the shirring thread removed; the delicate construction and obsessive attention to detail intimates the refined tailoring technique and immaculate eye of Chanel couture.

metmuseum.org

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20-10-2006
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Evening dress, 1938
Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel (French, 1883–1971)
Black silk net with polychrome sequins
Gift of Mrs. Harrison Williams, Lady Mendl, and Mrs. Ector Munn, 1946 (C.I.46.4.7a–c)

The decoration of sequined fireworks on this evening dress, which was worn by Countess Madeleine de Montgomery to Lady Mendl's seventy-fifth birthday party in 1939, is a fitting climax to le beau monde of the 1930s. When Adolf Hitler declared that Germany was at war with Poland in September 1939, the glamorous era of the 1930s came to a close. The fireworks motif, executed in brilliantly colored sequins, takes on additional symbolic meaning since the dress was created and worn immediately prior to the start of World War II. The dress was part of a collection assembled and brought to New York by the donors and their friends and displayed in an exhibition to benefit the French war charities in 1940.

metmuseum.org
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