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29-09-2006
  31
Stitch:the Hand
 
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Catherine Giacomini,cerfas....she actually did a corset too(well a non-traditional one,that is)of a felted rib cage....beautiful. She might have been inspired by that dress...but she didn't rip it off. Unlike that mention of D&G and the lobster dress...not surprised by that revelation since they always tend to copy other people's work.

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04-12-2006
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Here is an interesting excerpt from a book:

Fashion Trendsetter: Elsa Schiaparelli

Design by Schiaparelli
Elsa Schiaparelli, born in Rome, was the design trend setter of the 1930s. With a background in the arts, she had a natural sensitivity to fashion styling. Famous for her audacious improvisations, she truly did design the unusual.
In the mid 1920s, "Schiap" got her start in Paris by sketching a sweater and having it made by an American craftswoman. The black sweater had a large white bow motif knitted into its front. It was such a novel idea that Schiaparelli immediately received an order from an American buyer. Her sweater designs fitted in perfectly with the surrealistic art of the time. one design, featuring white ribs outlined on a black background, looked like an X-ray view of the chest—the fore- runner of the decorated T-shirt.
Schiaparelli's first salon, opened in 1927 and called Pour le Sport, specialized in sportswear and suits. Schiaparelli used bold accents of color, especially "shocking pink," which she made famous.
When the Depression put an end to frivolity, it also ended the Flapper Look. The waist returned to its normal po- sition and skirts fell below the knee. In addition, Schiaparelli moved the center of interest to the shoulders, which she be- gan to widen, accentuating them by pleats, padding, or braid—a silhouette that remained popular through World War II. Often called hard chic, her designs were smart rather than pretty. Schiaparelli used the bias cut for dresses, giving them a sensuous, clinging look that showed off the female figure. Very photogenic because of their bold statements, her designs dominated the fashion magazines.
Schiaparelli's daring nonsensical gadget accessories, such as fish buttons, foxhead gloves, and newspaper-print scarves, were just the right touch for the last frivolous, de- cadent years before World War 11. Schiaparelli also had a per- sonal interest in her clients, often trying to help them find the clothes best suited to them. she believed that clothes should fit one's life-style.
From the book Fashion From Concept to Consumer by Gini Stephens Frings

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Last edited by DosViolines; 01-06-2007 at 07:35 AM. Reason: removed revival discussion
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29-12-2006
  33
rising star
 
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I just started learning about her... shes an icon. Wow.
I think most new commers to fashion are forgetting people like Schiaparelli and Worth, its very sad since they had such a huge impact on the fashion world.

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11-02-2007
  34
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Mémoire de la mode: Schiaparelli
Éditions Assouline
François Baudot





Source: my scans

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11-02-2007
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(continued)








Source: my scans

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11-02-2007
  36
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Schiaperelli, or her influence, must come back!

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14-03-2007
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Elsa Schiaparelli
How on Earth did we not have a thread on her? I checked the spelling and searched three times and nothing came up. Well, I will start one for her then.

Quote:
Elsa Schiaparelli (September 10,1890 – November 13, 1973) was the leading Parisian fashion designer of the 1920s and 30s after Coco Chanel. She was born in Rome, Italy of Italian and Egyptian heritage. She was a great-niece of Giovanni Schiaparelli, who discovered the canals of Mars. Schiaparelli opened her first salon, "stupidir le Sport," in 1927, and as the name indicates specialized in clothing|sportswear. In 1931 her design of a divided tennis skirt for star player Lili de Alvarez shocked the staid tennis world when Alvarez wore what was the forerunner of shorts at the Wimbledon Championships. Schiaparelli became famous for her black knit sweaters with a white bowtie pattern sewn into the sweater. She had a flair for the unusual and even hired Salvador Dalí to design Textile|fabric, producing a white dress with a lobster print. Schiaparelli was the first to use padding|shoulder pads, animal print fabrics (in 1947), and zipper's dyed the same colors as the fabrics. She is also well known for her surrealist designs of the 1930s, especially her hat's, including the Dalí design resembling a giant shoe and one a giant lamb chop, both which were famously worn by the Franco-American Singer sewing machine heiress Daisy Fellowes, who was one of Schiaparelli's best clients and who owned a pink gemstone that inspired the color shocking pink. She collaborated with many surrealist artists, Salvador Dalí, Jean Cocteau, and Alberto Giacometti, between 1936 and 1939.
She designed a number of perfumes in addition to clothing; the first and most famous of which, named Shocking, was created in 1936. Shocking is famous less for the fragrance itself than for its packaging: besides a box colored a shocking pink, the bottle itself was in the shape of a woman's torso, based on the curvaceous body of one of Schiaparelli's clients, film star Mae West. For West, she designed costumes for the film Every Day's a Holiday(1938). She also designed Zsa Zsa Gabor's costumes for the film Moulin Rouge(1952). In 1935 Schiaparelli moved to a salon overlooking the Place Vendôme in Paris. Her output slowed by World War II and the title of trendsetters going to younger designers such as Christian Dior, her couture house declared bankruptcy in 1954 and she moved to the USA.
She was briefly married to Count William de Wendt de Kerlor (1883-), a Franco-Swiss psychic medium once described as "a persuasive but inconstant Theosophist", and moved with him to Greenwich Village in New York City, where she sold clothing designed by the French couturier Paul Poiret. They had one child, Maria Luisa Yvonne Radha, known as Gogo, who was born in New York City in 1919.
wikipedia.org

I always remember her rivalry with Coco, but she was a brilliant designer on her own. Maybe extravagant, but brilliant.

Apollo of Versailles, Cape, 1938
Elsa Schiaparelli (French, born Italy, 1890–1973), Designer
French; Made Paris, France
[no medium available]; Length at CB: 40 in. (101.6 cm)
Gift of Estate of Lady Mendl, 1951 (C.I.51.83)


met.org

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Last edited by Whitelinen; 28-05-2007 at 02:34 PM.
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14-03-2007
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Blouse, Evening, 1940–1945
Elsa Schiaparelli (French, born Italy, 1890–1973), Designer
French
rayon, plastic, glass; Blouse (a) Length at CB: 22 3/4 in. (57.8 cm) Belt (b) Length: 36 1/4 in. (92.1 cm) Handbag (c) Overall: 13 1/2 x 8 1/2 in. (34.3 x 21.6 cm) Mirror (d): N/A Change Purse (e): N/A
Gift of Julia B. Henry, 1978 (1978.288.23a–e)


met.org

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14-03-2007
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Quote:
Evening jacket, 1938
Elsa Schiaparelli (French, born Italy, 1890–1973)
Deep magenta rayon crepe embroidered with metallic thread and polychrome sequins with plastic insect buttons
Gift of Mrs. J. R. Keagy, 1974 (1974.338.2)

Dinner Suit, 1937–1938
Elsa Schiaparelli (French, born Italy, 1890–1973)
Green silk crepe and green silk velvet embroidered with metallic thread and red and pink rhinestones with half dome shaped plastic buttons inset with flowers
Gift of Julia B. Henry, 1978 (1978.288.19a–c)


While Mademoiselle Cheruit had her "smokings," a fitted jacket ensemble for early evening affairs, Schiaparelli was the most famous purveyor of the cocktail-appropriate dinner suit. Her suit consisted of a bolero or flared jacket that could be removed for the evening, and a sleeveless sheath dress. Unlike the previous decade, the 1930s dictated different skirt lengths for different hours: the silk, rayon, or wool crepe sheath of the dinner suit was steadfastly ankle or "cocktail" length.
Schiaparelli's dinner jackets changed the outline of women's fashion from soft to hard, from feminine to masculine during the mid- to late 1930s. The basic silhouette, which comprised wide shoulders and a narrow waist, first appeared in her autumn/winter 1931–32 collection entitled "Wooden Soldiers," which was inspired by the Indo-Chinese costumes featured in the 1931 Exposition Coloniale in Paris. The extended shoulders, achieved through padding, became hugely influential in Hollywood, helped along by international café society darlings like Lady Mendl (Elsie de Wolfe), Mrs. Reginald (Daisy) Fellowes, and the Duchess of Windsor.
During a trip to America, Schiaparelli commented, "In Hollywood, one special item of popularity had preceded me—that of the padded shoulders. I had started them to give women a slimmer waist. They proved the Mecca of the manufacturers. Joan Crawford had adopted them and molded her silhouette on them for years to come. They became emphasized and monstrous. Adrian took them up with overwhelming enthusiasm."
met.org

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Last edited by Whitelinen; 28-05-2007 at 02:34 PM.
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14-03-2007
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Quote:
Suit, fall/winter 1938–39
Elsa Schiaparelli (French, born Italy, 1890–1973)
Wool
Gift of Mrs. J. R. Keagy, 1974 (1974.338.1a,b)


Although sinuous curves ruled the evening wear silhouette in the 1930s, the strong shoulder was a dominant element as well, especially in the crisp suits of Elsa Schiaparelli. While not herself a tailor, and scorned by arch-rival Chanel for her lack of skills, Schiaparelli presided over one of the great tailoring ateliers responsible for the definitive broad-shouldered and form-fitting suits and jackets of the 1930s. The designer's conceptual embellishments were based on this tailoring foundation. In some instances, the tailors spoke for themselves, as in this example, a suit with breast pockets incorporated into the dimension of the bust. The strong shoulders of the 1930s were expressed through shoulder pads, wide lapels, shawls, capes, boat necklines, and accents of feathers or frothy scarves. Hollywood actress Joan Crawford was particularly enamored of the padded-out look after buying a few Schiaparelli suits in the early 1930s. This and the work of American designer Adrian carried the strong shoulder into the 1940s.
met.org

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"Because of all sorts of cloth have their motions, as well as Bodies, it must needs that they differ in themselves." -Lomazzo

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14-03-2007
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Evening Cape Neptune Fountain
schiaparelli.com

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Last edited by Whitelinen; 28-05-2007 at 02:34 PM.
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14-03-2007
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Sunburst on a shocking pink cape
same source as above

Black Velvet Jacket with Mirrors
same source

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"Because of all sorts of cloth have their motions, as well as Bodies, it must needs that they differ in themselves." -Lomazzo

Last edited by Whitelinen; 28-05-2007 at 02:34 PM.
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14-03-2007
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Embroidered evening cape
same source

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Last edited by Whitelinen; 28-05-2007 at 02:34 PM.
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14-03-2007
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Quote:
Aftershock What happened to the provocative Elsa Schiaparelli?

By Josh Patner
Posted Monday, Nov. 24, 2003, at 10:43 AM ET Elsa Schiaparelli
You're likely to hear more than a few breathless "Oohs"at "Shocking! The Art and Fashion of Elsa Schiaparelli," but don't expect to be shocked. The show—on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through Jan. 4—has been mounted with neither the fashion context nor artistic references needed to appreciate Schiaparelli's remarkable innovations. Even if it is difficult to resist the charm of the glittering Lesage embroideries and madcap gowns, this show ultimately fails for the very same reason that Schiaparelli's house ultimately did: Fashion is not art, and posturing doesn't make it so.
Trompe l'oeil pullover
Schiaparelli, the famously provocative couturière, changed nearly everything about the rarefied fashion business. In 1927 her debut collection—featuring sweaters knit with surrealist trompe l'oeil images—led to a buying frenzy on both sides of the Atlantic. When World War II broke out 12 years later—effectively ending the era of Schiaparelli's supremacy—only arch rival Coco Chanel could claim to have been more influential. Yet Schiaparelli's role in the creation of modern haute couture is little known. The other mainstays of the gilded Parisian world of high fashion—Chanel, Dior, and Saint Laurent—found ways to adapt to the radically new postwar environment and are still productive, worldwide brands. Schiaparelli's house closed in 1954.
Schiaparelli was born in 1890 to a staid family of Roman intellectuals and scholars. A plain-Jane of a girl, she seems to have lived only to shock: Inspired by da Vinci's urge to fly, the young Elsa once tried to float to the garden below her bedroom window with the aid of an umbrella. In a society still dominated by the church, she left Catholic school, unwilling to follow the nuns' lessons silently, and caused further scandal by publishing a book of sexually suggestive poetry. She began a deeply felt relationship with a young man; when her parents put it to an end she left Rome for the bohemia of Greenwich Village.
slate.com

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14-03-2007
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Part II from slate.com

Quote:

A rayon dress
There is no understanding this restless, belligerent woman without first imagining the contrast of sleepy, provincial Rome to racy, metropolitan New York in 1919. The modernity of her new life—skyscrapers, the newfound automation and speed of the city, and a social circle that included Man Ray, Edward Steichen, Francis and Gabrielle Picabia—had a profound impact on her sensibility. In her work, Schiap, as she was known (pronounced "skap"), combined a European sense of history with an American addiction to change, fusing the old world and the new. She catapulted post-World War I fashion into the newly machine- and media-driven age. She was the first designer to open a prêt-à-porter boutique and issue press releases; first to seek notoriety outside the insular fashion world by dressing movie starlets and athletes; first to collaborate with the leading artists of her day. Many of her designs challenged the traditional silk and satin perimeters of haute couture, incorporating man-made fibers with futuristic names like Rhodophane, a new plastic. And her unprecedented marketing campaign in the United States—where she endorsed accessible interpretations of her designs—ensured the phenomenal success she enjoyed throughout the Depression.
Man Ray's Le Beau Temps, 1939
Schiaparelli is widely recognized as the designer who worked with the surrealists. One imagines this is partly why she has been given a museum show. Among her most famous creations are a dress embroidered with Jean Cocteau's line-drawing of a woman's profile and a shoe inverted into a hat that she conceived with Salvador Dalí. She worked under the assumption that fashion and art had similar goals. Schiaparelli was not merely mimicking surrealism's visual play nor was she trying to be trendy. She was, in fact, exposing the surreal aspect of her own medium: Fashion—and particularly haute couture—is meant to make the quotidian extraordinary; all fashion is a form of metamorphosis. And so Schiap's dress becomes a painting, and a shoe becomes a hat. But "Shocking!" fails to examine the importance of Schiaparelli's artistic collaborations. Man Ray's Le Beau Temps is, in fact, the only major surrealist work on display. Nor does the exhibition ask us to consider the difference between artistic ideas and art—or even whether artistic ideas always make for attractive fashion. These are questions no useful examination of Schiaparelli's career can fail to ask.
Evening dress with butterfly print
Meanwhile, as a fashion retrospective, the show doesn't acknowledge Schiaparelli's contribution to posterity: After all, her oeuvre is the stylish vault from which nearly every important designer from Alaia to Zoran has lifted an inspiring gold brick or two. Why not make the heist clear? Schiaparelli's innovative signatures—squared-off shoulders and nipped waistlines, whimsical prints, thematic collections, graphically patterned sweaters, decorative dinner jackets—have been so deeply absorbed into fashion's vernacular that it is difficult now to identify their source. But her influence is everywhere: Sonia Rykiel's graphic knits, Gianni Versace's butterfly and zodiac prints, Donna Karan's organic separates, Yves Saint Laurent's decoration, John Galliano's cultural referencing, Rei Kawakubo's distorted silhouettes. The list goes on.
Distinctive booties
The curator, Dilys E. Blum—who deserves some credit for mounting the first retrospective of this pivotal designer's work—doesn't provide the social context that would illustrate why Schiaparelli was so shocking in her day: There's no sense of the clothes made by Schiaparelli's fellow couturiers, whose bourgeois creations she reacted against so strongly. Nor does the exhibition illustrate the social tumult experienced between the two World Wars. Why neutralize history? And why not show what the clothes looked like as they were worn? Society doyenne Millicent Rogers, one of Schiaparelli's main clients, wore more than 10 of the ensembles on view in the show; it would be great to be able to see what she looked like in them.
An evening coat
So what is Schiap's legacy, in the end? André Breton wrote in the surrealist manifesto that "nothing but the marvelous is beautiful." Schiap understood this ethos in the deepest sense: The once plain-Jane girl had grown into a jolie-laide woman. While Schiap dressed both überandrogynous Marlene Dietrich and überfeminine Mae West, the contrast between the sturdy daytime suits and zestful evening clothes on display suggests that Schiaparelli was wrestling with the changing social roles for women—particularly the problem of how to dress the newly professional woman by day and the traditional femme fatale by night. But ultimately there is something poignant in these clothes: High concept and ornament were more than Schiaparelli's particular gifts. Schiaparelli, more dowager than bombshell, used them to hide the body. Look past the comic buttons and whimsical prints celebrated at this exhibition: The clothes are essentially dowdy. The necklines are high, and the sleeves are long. The colors are dour and the shapes, when not bizarre, are quite dull. Don't be fooled by the girlishly printed party frocks and the occasional frill of ruffle and bow: For all their seeming frivolity, Schiaparelli's designs are for women who, like Schiap, were insecure about their looks. These clothes say, Look but don't touch.
Schiaparelli had a famously inquisitive mind; her clothes emphasize brains over beauty. They lack the graceful technique—and palpable sexuality—of her contemporaries Jean Patou, Jeanne Lanvin, and Madeleine Vionnet. With the exception of her early wraparound pajamas and some finely done evening columns, the silhouette of Schiap's clothes is merely a support for the ornament, a canvas for commentary and play. But fashion is not art, and great dressmaking wilts under the weight of trying to make it so. Is it surprising that 1954 saw both the closing of Schiaparelli's business and the remarkable comeback of Chanel's?

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