How to Join
the Fashion Spot / All Things Vintage / History of Style : a remembrance of things past
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
16-03-2007
  31
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,773
Dress, Evening, 1958
Madame Grès (Alix Barton) (French, 1903–1993), Designer
French
Gift of Mrs. Leon L. Roos, 1973 (1973.104.2)
met.org




__________________
"Because of all sorts of cloth have their motions, as well as Bodies, it must needs that they differ in themselves." -Lomazzo

Last edited by Hanne; 08-11-2007 at 05:58 AM. Reason: Removed pictures found and reinstated
  Reply With Quote
 
16-03-2007
  32
fashion icon
 
Mutterlein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,383
She was very popular in the 70's as well. The costume collection I work at has a TON of Madame Gres from that era. It's all amazing. And I think she still oversaw her production at that time but I will have to check on that.

  Reply With Quote
16-03-2007
  33
front row
 
buddleja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Estonia
Gender: femme
Posts: 447
ahhh, thanks for all these pictures her dresses are fantastic

__________________
http://justglitterlust.blogspot.com/

Estonian streetstyle site
  Reply With Quote
19-03-2007
  34
V.I.P.
 
ilaughead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 4,790
I got the Assouline book about her a while back, and I have to say, I am very impressed. I like how she worked both in her signature long, lean, Grecian silhouette and one with a bit more volume.

Status: Online
 
Reply With Quote
19-03-2007
  35
Stitch:the Hand
 
Scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Among the trees
Gender: homme
Posts: 12,908
it would be nice if Koji's work got more attention because runner posted some images some time ago,and it his work is so exquisite.

  Reply With Quote
19-03-2007
  36
a hymn to darkness
 
wheneveriwakeup's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: A lace utopia...
Gender: femme
Posts: 2,356
I am in awe. Deeply. She draped like no other. It's all so rich and light...

  Reply With Quote
05-06-2007
  37
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
http://www.designerhistory.com/histo...hion/gres.html

Quote:
Madame Grès was haute couture's sphinx, an austere and dignified person who dedicated her whole life to perfecting the art of draping and pleating vast amounts of cloth into a single gown. She defied the vulgarity of fashion and hated the glare of publicity. She was a genius who was admired by everyone in the fashion industry but died in obscurity and poverty.

Germaine Emilie Krebs was born in 1903 in Paris, France. Frustrated in her ambition to become a sculptor, she began her career by making Toiles for major Paris fashion houses. She worked for a time for the house of Premet.

In 1934, she opened her own house under the name of Alix Barton, and her gowns started to appear in fashion magazines under the name ALIX. She started experimenting with simple clothing, particularly jersey day dresses. Initially she was in partnership, and she decided to leave Alix, as the name belonged to someone else.

During the 30's, the Alix gowns were greatly admired. Her training in sculpture enabled her to capture the classical Greek style and timeless elegance in her evening gowns. Hers was an individual uncompromising style which seemed to have a liquid effect on the drapery and turned fashionable women into living statues.

She formed a new salon GRES, taking the letters of the name from the name of her husband Russian painter Serge Czerefkov, whom she had married in 1939. After a few years, he left her and her baby daughter and went to Tahiti, never to return. She was heartbroken but she financed him until his death in 1970 although she never saw him again.

The house of Grès opened in 1942 at l, rue de la Paix, during the German occupation of Paris. In spite of her being Jewish, the Germans initially allowed her to continue her business hoping that she would dress the wives of German officers. When she refused to do so, they closed her down.

The salon reopened after the war and Madame Grès was again feted as a master couturier. She insisted on haute couture in a age of mass production. Her gowns often took 300 working hours to complete. They were constructed pleat by pleat, each pleat l millimeter wide. She said "My only desire is to create dresses that impress the world", however this led to severe financial problems.

She continued making her dresses throughout the 50's, 60's and 70's. She often visited the Museum of Fine Arts, studying the classical Greek statues and returning to her atelier to create her own forms of classical gowns. She would sometimes use up to 70 metres of silk jersey.

She did not design for the glitterati, but for rich women who conducted truly private lives. Among them were Gersende de Sabran-Ponteves, Duchess d'Orleans, Princess Ghislaine de Polignac, the Begum Aga Khan, Princess Grace of Monaco, Marella Agnelli and Marie-Helene de Rothschild.

She brought out her first Perfume Cabochard in 1959. She gave out a licensing agreement for scarves and neckties, and designed jewellery for Cartier. She was awarded the Golden Thimble, fashion's highest award in 1976.

However in 1982, to keep her couture going, she rashly sold her Perfume rights to Beecham. Eventually, very reluctantly she was forced to make ready-to-wear garments.

In 1987 the house went bankrupt. Toiles, mannequins, dresses, archives were thrown into rubbish bins and destroyed. A Japanese group bought the name but Madame Gres and her daughter left Paris in 1990 for seclusion.

Losing her work destroyed Madame Grès, without her work she had nothing to live for. In 1993, she died in poverty in an old people's sanatorium. Her daughter did not inform the world, as she herself was very poor. However when the news did come out, the French fashion industry was shocked and shamed. She had been President of the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, Haute Couture's governing body and she was the oldest living Couturier, a French legend, who had been allowed to disappear and to die unrecognized.

In 1994, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, held a major retrospective of the work of Madame Alix Grès, which was attended by thousands of people. But of course this was too late to help the great designer herself.

The Gres Style

Alix and Grès gowns, stand for an ideal of beauty and skillful handwork now nearly obsolete. Her method never changed. She worked 365 days a year producing nearly 350 models. She worked with a live model, making a pattern directly on the figure. She cut, pinned and fastened the toile herself.

Having directed the flow of the folds with her hands, she then had the unpressed pleats stitched into place, making these pleated areas appear to be woven into each other. The fabric fell from them to the floor in graceful folds.

She also designed bias-cut, away from the body (bias usually follows the body) dresses and caftans in bright gilt brocades, failles, linen, silk, satin and organdy. Using stiff paper taffeta she made togas that fell in a triangle from neck to floor.

Her dresses used cut rather than a print, combining different colours of the same fabric in a patchwork. Her day clothes of leather, soft wool, tweeds and plaids were hooded, batwing-sleeved, shaped like kimonos or caped. Her silhouette changed little in half a century, for current fashions have never guided Grès in placement of waistline or hemline.

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
05-06-2007
  38
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
Sorry about the little toolbars... If you search http://www. wwar.com, you will find images of these works at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco. And you can zoom to see the details more closely!

Quote:
"Hot pants": jumpsuit, 1970 - 1980, velvet and taffeta.

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by DosViolines; 05-06-2007 at 06:50 PM. Reason: Removed off-topic image
  Reply With Quote
05-06-2007
  39
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
Quote:
1960 Cocktail dress in magenta silk.


Quote:
1967–1985 Evening gown in ream silk jersey


metmuseum.org

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by SomethingElse; 05-06-2007 at 05:54 PM.
  Reply With Quote
05-06-2007
  40
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517


See more images and a link to the label here: http://www.swankvintage.com/1665.html

swankvintage.com

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
05-06-2007
  41
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
From the mid 1960s.





Quote:
Book Description
Her jersey draperies belong to the legends of haute couture. This amazing figure, who looked like a nun, was a viruoso who knew just how to pay tribute to the movement and freedom of the body. Within the boundaries of exoticism and adventure, she illuminated Paris with her genius before vanishing into oblivion. Beyond all her fashions, Madame Gres remains a myth.

About the Author
Laurence Benaim is a journalist and directs the fashion pages at Le Monde. She has written a biography of Yves Saint Laurent (Grasset, 1993).
vintagefashionguild.org . amazon.com

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by SomethingElse; 05-06-2007 at 09:02 PM.
  Reply With Quote
14-06-2007
  42
V.I.P.
 
BetteT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: femme
Posts: 20,406






All images: Luxe-magazine.com

__________________
Bette
** It's All in the Details! **
http://www.musecube.com/BetteT/
  Reply With Quote
14-06-2007
  43
V.I.P.
 
BetteT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: femme
Posts: 20,406
"Here are two evening gowns: a white, pleated silk jersey, 1971; and a Bordeaux pleated silk jersey, 1969. Photo courtesy of The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco"



SFGAte.com

__________________
Bette
** It's All in the Details! **
http://www.musecube.com/BetteT/
  Reply With Quote
14-06-2007
  44
V.I.P.
 
BetteT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Los Angeles
Gender: femme
Posts: 20,406

www.intellego.fr

__________________
Bette
** It's All in the Details! **
http://www.musecube.com/BetteT/
  Reply With Quote
14-06-2007
  45
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
The gowns from post #43 are just gorgeous!

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
grès, madame
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:05 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.