How to Join
the Fashion Spot / All Things Vintage / History of Style : a remembrance of things past
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
07-06-2007
  16
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
Quote:
Black worsted wool coat with white cotton piqué collar, about 1938


vam.ac.uk

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
 
10-07-2007
  17
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
Quote:
Charles James "shrimp dress," c. 1955
fitnyc

Attached Images
File Type: jpg Image02.jpg (9.8 KB, 153 views)

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
10-07-2007
  18
barcode
 
Spike413's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: New York
Gender: homme
Posts: 14,404
Mutterlein, I've actually heard that same story from a professor of mine who didn't know him personally, but had a friend who knew him.

I remember an exhibit at FIT last winter and the first piece when you walked in was a peachy pink Charles James gown. The most remarkable thing about it is that it wasn't on a mannequin, it was standing up on it's own....a testament to his remarkable knowledge of structure. I would love to turn his pieces inside out and explore them.


Love this piece from the V&A collection
Quote:
Date
1936-1937

Techniques
Black satin, with silk ribbons, fastened with press studs and hooks and eyes

Artist/designer
James, Charles, born 18/07/1906 - died 23/09/1978 (designers)

Place
Paris, France

Museum number
T.290-1978

In 1928 the Anglo-American designer Charles James (1906-1978) brought a nonconformist vision to fashion that won him the ardent support of an elegant coterie of women with the courage to wear his adventurous, and at times demanding, creations. This black sliver of a dress in shiny slipper satin was the culmination of months of experiments with pleating wide silk ribbons to create bodices that opened around the torso like petals.

Credit line
Bequeathed by Miss Philippa Barnes
vam.co.uk
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2006AP3385.jpg (55.3 KB, 22 views)
File Type: jpg 2006AP3383.jpg (95.7 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg 2006AP3380.jpg (66.2 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg 2006AP3381.jpg (91.5 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg 2006AP3382.jpg (96.7 KB, 8 views)

__________________
You need to move fashion forward when there's a reason to move fashion forward - Tom Ford

  Reply With Quote
10-07-2007
  19
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
That dress is absolutely gorgeous!

Thanks for posting Spike413

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
10-07-2007
  20
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,550
Isn't there another famous pic of his gowns-it was in Vogue in 1948, I believe.

  Reply With Quote
12-07-2007
  21
barcode
 
Spike413's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: New York
Gender: homme
Posts: 14,404
Some other photos and a description of the four leaf clover design for Mrs William Randolph Hearst.







Quote:
The bodice and upper part of the skirt are made of ivory silk satin interfaced with ivory cotton muslin. The upper skirt is also interfaced with horsehair canvas and stiff bobbinet tulle. Black silk velvet is joined by hand to the upper and lower pieces. The lower hem section is made of ivory silk faille interfaced with yellowed non-woven Pellon® and stiff white bobbinet tulle, covered with an ivory silk faille inner facing. The visible layers at the bodice cover a peach-colored silk satin lining boned eleven times and extending below the waist level. The dress closes with a center back zipper. At some point, the gown was severely altered and possibly taken apart and suffered flood damage at the hem. A new understructure was created in 2007 by Gayle Strege and Joycelyn Falsken to replicate the effect of the original three-layered understructure observed at the Brooklyn Museum

diagram of the seaming...

dept.kent.edu

__________________
You need to move fashion forward when there's a reason to move fashion forward - Tom Ford

  Reply With Quote
12-07-2007
  22
barcode
 
Spike413's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: New York
Gender: homme
Posts: 14,404
The "Butterfly Gown"







dept.kent.edu

Quote:
How:
Section 1: Sheath Dress
The sheath is composed of up to eight layers of fabric. The outermost layer consists of a smoke-grey silk chiffon overlay draped in a swag with a center front axis. The front neckline has a section of chocolate-brown tulle overlay instead of chiffon. The folds of the overlay cover the multitude of stitches that anchors it to a base of light-pink silk satin interfaced with cotton muslin. These three layers of fabric create a shell that is attached to an inner bodice and two skirts. The pink satin bodice is boned vertically thirteen times and extends below the Petersham waist ribbon. Two visible oval batting pads covered in white silk chiffon are stitched to the bodice below the shoulder blades. Attached to the bodice at waist level is a structural skirt and a skirt lining. Except for a triangular section from the pelvic area to the back slit at the hem, the structural skirt of ivory silk faille interfaced with cotton muslin is interfaced a second time with horsehair canvas and third time with stiff bobbinet tulle. The ivory silk taffetas lining is the innermost layer. The dress closes at the center-back with a zipper.

Section 2: Back Bustle Attachment
The bustle is sewn to the exterior of the dress at the buttocks area, and when it meets the center back slit, it wraps around the opening and is attached to the dress inside and out. A double arch structure centered at the back crowns the bustle. The arches are built in two sections: the draped outer shell and the structural base. The outer shell consists of pleated rose-colored silk satin interfaced with black organza. On the lowest of the three anchored pleats, two added layers of ivory silk faille interfacing provide a thicker hand. The layers of the structural base on which the draped layer rests are not visible. The exterior layers of silk taffeta are extremely stiff and probably contain several layers of tulle and horsehair canvas. Above the arches and on both sides of the lower part of the zipper is a gathered panel of chocolate brown tulle. Below the arches is an accumulation of tulle layers. Truncated quadrants of tulle are gathered and layered from outer to inner layers as such: two of chocolate brown, two of chestnut brown, two of lilac. The hem of the meandering tulle godet measures 20.7 m / 22 ¾ yards. The added hem length of the six layers of tulle totals 124.2 m / 135.8 yards, which is longer than a football field. The complete dress weighs 3.4 kg / 7 ½ lb, contrary to the 18 pounds attributed to the tulle section in Elizabeth Ann Coleman's The Genius of Charles James.


__________________
You need to move fashion forward when there's a reason to move fashion forward - Tom Ford

  Reply With Quote
12-07-2007
  23
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
Breathtaking!

I could examine these dresses for hours...

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
26-07-2007
  24
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
Quote:
Charles James Cocktail Dress, 1949
whitakerauction

Attached Images
File Type: jpg 007a.jpg (22.4 KB, 4 views)
File Type: jpg 007b.jpg (31.2 KB, 5 views)
File Type: jpg 007c.jpg (32.7 KB, 3 views)
File Type: jpg 007d.jpg (37.4 KB, 9 views)
File Type: jpg 007e.jpg (18.6 KB, 164 views)
File Type: jpg 007f.jpg (28.5 KB, 167 views)

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
28-08-2007
  25
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
Quote:
A fine and rare Charles James black satin evening gown, early 1940s, inked signature label dated 40 or 44, with twin winged cutwork panels to the pointed neck, the armholes formed by wings of pleated satin, their broadness accentuating the narrowness of the waist and hips, the curving waist seam with ingeniously draped folds to the sides, the back with coarse metal zip fastener, and curved waist seam, bust 89cm, 35in Charles James was born in Sandhurst, England in 1906 the son of a British army officer and American mother. He went on to become one of the greatest couturiers of the 20th century. At the age of 19 he set up as a milliner in his mother's home town of Chicago before moving to New York in 1928. He travelled constantly between America and Europe and by 1934 had opened a Paris salon. Upon seeing his work Poiret is reputed to have said "I pass you my crown. Wear it well"', Balenciaga described him as "the world's best and only dressmaker". Dior claimed that his New Look was inspired by Charles James. By 1940 James had moved to New York and set up as Charles James Inc. It was in America that he was to really make his name and where most of his clients were based. He was an innovative genius who did not believe in fashion seasons or looks. Whereas other couturiers changed their designs every six months he worked on his designs for years. He developed about two hundred thesis designs with an intellectual, almost scientific precision and logic. He created a master pattern or `sloper' which he would adapt with interchangeable parts for sleeves, bodice, armhole which could be combined to produce thousands of variations. He developed spiral draping, a spiral zip, a rbbon ball dress, a figure eight skirt and pneumatic jackets which Dali referred to as `soft sculpture'. He saw his clothes as works of art whose rightful resting place was a museum. He commented that "All my seams have meaning "and "cut in dressmaking is like grammar in language". He often made his customers wait for years for a dress to be delivered and he charged them astronomic sums for the privilege. His `Clover Leaf ' ball gown of 1953 was the apogee of his talents of which James said "I had intended it to be the last and final statement and it was composed of several parts previously devleloped as separate designs." In 1958 he retired from couture and spent his time lecturing and teaching. He died in impoverished circumstances in New York in 1978.


kerrytaylorauctions.com

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
28-08-2007
  26
Press escape to continue.
 
SomethingElse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,517
Quote:
Copper taffeta bias-cut gown with assymetric skirt, 1940s, unlabelled, with plunging, sweetheart neckline, the bust darts curve outwards towards the waist, the short sleeves are shirred and gathered, the skirt panel curves from an asymmetric point at the waist and circles the main body of the dress, worn over long pencil skirt with large godet of fabric inset at the back to give extra fullness,


kerrytaylorauctions.com

__________________
“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
  Reply With Quote
28-08-2007
  27
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,550
Breathtaking!

  Reply With Quote
03-11-2007
  28
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
Quote:
Charles James (England, 1906-07-18 - 1978-09-23)
Woman's Evening Gown, 1951
Costume/clothing principle attire/entire body, Silk chiffon, silk satin, and nylon chiffon, Center back length: 62 in. (157.48 cm)
lacma.org
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 55_75.jpg (79.8 KB, 14 views)
File Type: jpg 55_75detail1.jpg (72.7 KB, 19 views)

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
03-11-2007
  29
far from home...
 
DosViolines's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,253
Quote:
Woman's Two-piece Suit, 1952
Costume/clothing principle attire/lower body; Costume/clothing principle attire/upper body, Wool, velvet, satin lining, a) Jacket center back length: 21 1/2 in. (54.61 cm); b) Skirt center back length: 28 in. (71.12 cm)
lacma.org
Attached Images
File Type: jpg M74_77a-b.jpg (34.3 KB, 6 views)
File Type: jpg M74_77a-bDetail01.jpg (122.3 KB, 7 views)

__________________
And I am nothing of a builder, but here I dreamt I was an architect
And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
  Reply With Quote
03-11-2007
  30
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,550
Fabu!

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
charles, james
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:36 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.