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16-06-2007
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1914–1992 Emilio Pucci
Oh my goodness! No Pucci thread!!

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Born: Marchese Emilio Pucci di Barsento in Naples, 20 November 1914.
Education: Attended the University of Milan, 1933-35, University of Georgia, 1935-36, Reed College, Portland, Oregon, 1936-37; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., University of Florence, 1941.
Family: Married Cristina Nannini di Casabianca, 1959; children: Alessandro, Laudomia.
Military Service: Bomber pilot in the Italian Air Force, 1938-42.
Career: Oylmpic skier, 1934; women's skiwear designer, White Stag, for Lord & Taylor department store, 1948; freelance fashion designer, from 1949; first Pucci shop established in Capri, 1949, Rome, Elba, Montecatini, from 1950; president, Emilio Pucci SrL, Florence, and Emilio Pucci, New York, from 1950; vice-president for design/merchandising, Formfit International, 1960s; business run by family after death, 1992; daughter Laudomia assumed design duties; men's ties, swimwear reintroduced, 1998; new womenswear designed by Stephan Janson, 1998; majority share acquired by LVMH, 2000; launched website, 2001.
Awards: Neiman Marcus award, 1954, 1967; Sports Illustrated award, 1955, 1961; Burdines Fashion award, 1955; the Sunday Times award, London, 1963; Association of Industrial Design award, Milan, 1968; Drexel University award, Philadelphia, 1975; Italy-Austria award, 1977; Knighthood, Rome, 1982; Medaille de la Ville de Paris, 1985; Council of Fashion Designers of America award, 1990.
Died: 29 November 1992, in Florence, Italy.
Company Address: Palazzo Pucci, via dei Pucci 6, Florence, Italy.
Company Website:www.emiliopucci.com. Currently under construction.

Rising out of the ashes of European fashion after World War II, Emilio Pucci brought a spectrum of carefree colors to the rationed continent. His sportswear beginnings lent a casual air to his work, a welcome relief from recent austerity and a new meaning to the term "resort wear." The swirling freestyle patterns and fluid fabrics he used became internationally recognized and desired, copied by many but rivaled by few.

American Tina Lesser may have been earlier with her hand-painted silks, but Pucci quickly made them his own, covering the fine lustrous fabric with optical fantasies of geometric shapes. His color range came straight from an Aegean horizon, turquoise and ultramarine set against sea green and lime, or hot fuchsia and sunflower yellow. Pucci swept away the repetitive sailor styles and tailored linens of cruisewear and brought in a new air of ease and luxury with his breezy separates. He capitalized on the lull in British and French couture after the war that benefitted many American and Italian designers, and dressed the fashionable mondaine in bold ready-to-wear.

The government-backed presentations of Italian designers of the late 1940s provided an aristocratic Florentine backdrop for Pucci's collections, which were soon internationally popular, and he became increasingly aware of the importance of the American market to his success. His characteristic style was best seen in slim-legged trousers in fruity shades, which provided a sexy foil to loose-hanging tunics and classic shirts left to hang outside the waistband.

His collections encompassed more than just stylish but jaunty daywear. In 1961 he showed simple evening dresses with deep V-shape panels set into their sophisticated bias-cut silhouette. Pucci saw his greatest success in the 1960s; his psychedelic-patterned printed silks were seen everywhere. They were, and continued to be worn by celebrities, from early clients Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy to Madonna, all seduced by the light touch of his designs.

As his reputation grew, Pucci's distinctive patterns were aspired to by many; a Pucci scarf or vivid silk handbag provided the cachet of luxury. His name was seen on everything from gloves to small ornaments, yet by the 1970s his work, like that of other big fashion houses, seemed less in tune with the times. During the 1980s, Pucci ranges seemed irrelevant to the weighty tailored severity that preoccupied the fashion world. It was not until the start of the 1990s that the pure whirling colors of the Pucci label (by then directed by his daughter, Laudomia) were again universally embraced. His signature shapes and vivid patterns had already inspired a generation of Italian designers, notably Gianni Versace and Franco Moschino, and in 1991 the reinvigorated Pucci look was everywhere. It had been translated into the modern essentials—clingy leggings, catsuits, and stretch polo necks which continued the sexy feel of his work and contrasted perfectly with his airy shirts. His clothes sold out across the world as a new, younger audience took up the label, perpetuating its popularity, albeit on a less high profile level after the initial Pucci mania earlier in the year.

The eclectic use of surface pattern and innovative color combinations distinguishing Pucci's work have been widely emulated throughout the fashion strata. His use of color added a feeling of movement to his clothes, while the quality fabrics enhanced the fluid line. The classic separates he designed continued to be successful, while the addition of newer styles ensured that the label would continue as a vibrant note to fashion in the later 1990s after Pucci's death in 1992.

A rebirth of Pucci's distinctive prints for men, including swimwear, sleepwear and ties, was scheduled to arrive in U.S. in 1998, but not before a new collection of womenswear debuted in Florence in January. At a time when original Pucci designs brought in premium prices at vintage shops, the reissue of menswear was inspired. The fall/winter womenswear line, however, grew out of different circumstances. "The whole idea started during the Biennial exhibition in Florence last fall," Laudomia Pucci, a company's director, told Women's Wear Daily in December 1997. The tribute, arranged by her mother Crista, had garnered so much attention the family decided to introduce a 50-piece collection, mostly for women, designed by Milan-based designer Stephan Janson. "We decided on Stephan Janson to do the collection because he's young, well-traveled, and well-cultured," Laudomia commented, and Janson "will be able to live well in the Pucci universe."

In the 21st century, change came to Pucci by way of new ownership. In Feburary 2000 luxury conglomerate LVMH bought a controlling stake in the firm and initiated a rehaul of the Pucci image. Four new Pucci stores opened in Milan, Portofino, St. Moritz, and Palm Beach, followed by a segue into home furnishings. Next came the appointment of Puerto Rican designer Julio Espada as artistic director (Laudomia was named Image Director), and in 2001 came the launch of a snazzy Pucci website.

The online Pucci forum blended archival photos with newer images, with collections past and present. Laudomia believed the mix of "classic and contemporary" was worthy of special notice. "I don't think any fashion house with a history has tried to convey that dimension to an online audience," she remarked to Women's Wear Daily in July 2001. "They focus solely on now." The "now" of Pucci may be firmly rooted in the past, but is securely focused on the future.
More here: http://www.historyofashion.com/histo...ion/pucci.html

answers.com

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 16-06-2007 at 01:33 PM.
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16-06-2007
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1966 Polychrome silk jersey.


metmuseum.org

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16-06-2007
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This is a great page with lots of images of his designs for Braniff Airlines and links to his Braniff uniform designs. So very 60s! http://www.braniffpages.com/1965/1965.html. My favorite it the bubble hat!

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Pucci outfitted Braniff's Hostesses in the famous "Space Bubble" (officially called a "rain dome" by Braniff)


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Braniff's new president, Harding Lawrence, set about to completely redefine what an airline was about. Overnight the look of the aviation industry changed. Part of this innovation was the unveiling of the "Gemini 4" uniform by Italian designer, Emilio Pucci, on July 19, 1965. The bold new uniform entered fashion history when the Braniff "air strip" became standard fare the following September.

The complete uniform consisted of several components. Hostesses greeted passengers in a reversible wool coat accessorized with a pillbox hat and Pucci print velvet scarf. Beneath was a brilliant pink wool suit worn over a blue silk turtle neck tunic and culottes. For meal service the uniform was supplemented with a colorful apron dress called a "Puccino." Hostesses removed the outer layers of the uniform during the flight ultimately ending up in the tunic-culottes combination. A plastic bubble headdress was occasionally worn during inclement weather.

Hyacinth blue silk jersey tunic top, Pucci pink wool gabardine jacket with wrap skirt, reversible wool overcoat and matching vinyl boots. Courtesy of the Texas Fashion Collection


braniffpages.com . dallashistory.org

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by SomethingElse; 16-06-2007 at 02:17 PM.
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16-06-2007
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1960s Short velvet jacket in shades of purple, amethyst, pink and turquoise.


imageevent.com

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16-06-2007
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Wo - that was fast. http://www.emiliopucci.com/main.html is up and running now, and there are vintage photographs inspersed on the main page. Yay! There is also a "Now & Then" section.

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 16-06-2007 at 02:29 PM.
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16-06-2007
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Pucci Couture Elaborate Beaded Cocktail Dress
Italian, early 1960s
The underlying slip style dress of pastel printed silk chiffon over supporting layers, the print a geometric patchwork of large rectangles, each of a different color with matching vermiculate seed bead embroidery overall, each with its own self contained foliate design elaborately embroidered with numerous types of sequins, beads and faceted stones in a cornucopia of pastel shades, each divided by a scrolling vine design similarly embroidered, scalloped hem, lined with china silk with jacquard design Emilio, size 6, labeled: Emilio Pucci/Firenze.
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File Type: jpg pucci_beaded.jpg (75.8 KB, 10 views)

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And I built this balustrade to keep you home, to keep you safe from the outside world
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Pucci Silk Choli Pyjama Ensemble
Italian, 1950s
Aqua and yellow abstract pattern with Emilio imprint, a midriff baring V-neck blouse with set in long sleeves and baggy pants, the right leg slit at inner seam, the left leg wrapping to form faux surplice skirt, size 6, labeled: Emilio Pucci/Florence/Italy and Made in Italy for Burdine's Sunshine Fashions.
Excellent condition.
doylenewyork

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File Type: jpg 509357.jpg (21.6 KB, 5 views)

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18-06-2007
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Emilio Pucci pre-1962 silk blouse auctioned on eBayTM for $152.50 in February 2000 by vi-antiques-and-fine-art.





Pucci Half Slip, for Formfit Rogers, 1960s


source:http://www.coololdstuff.com/fashion2.html





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18-06-2007
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I love Pucci prints ... so much that my logo is taken from the colors he liked to use. These images are from a shoot I did a few years ago:


This pink shirt is vintage Pucci ... circa late 60's. It was crumbling in my hands, as I was buttoning it ... 100% silk .... obviously not well taken care of. I was horrified!
afa_train0106-web.jpg

The blue skirt is modern Pucci ... from about 2003
afa_train030-web-sm.jpg

Photographer: Eric Syriffler, New York
Stylist: Bette Tilch

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Last edited by BetteT; 18-06-2007 at 01:01 AM.
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18-06-2007
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More .....



Vintage ... late 60's/early 70's

http://www.losthorizonvintage.com


vintage 60's purse
whitaker3_1.jpg

http://zuburbia.blogspot.com



More vintage ... 1960's silk jersey dress ... sold for $750

http://www.swankvintage.com

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Last edited by BetteT; 18-06-2007 at 01:44 AM.
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18-06-2007
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^...^ Beautiful images!

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This is an elegant sleeveless evening gown in shades of lemon, muted orange, pale gray and white, with a zip front that extends to the hips. The bust measures 32", waist; 28.5", hips: 32", and overall length of 54.25". It is mint condition, except for an insignificant spot in back. The fabric is jersey. Excellent condition. SOLD.


losthorizonvintage.com

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18-06-2007
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An outstanding Emilio Pucci silk jersey evening gown. Very unusual use of subtle, muted colors. Pale, purple, pink, tan, blue-gray, etc... dotted with Emilio signature throughout. Fluidity of the fabric and cut make for a very sexy look. "V" neckline. Long sleeves. Label reads "Emilio Pucci Florence Italy. 100% Pure Silk" Additional label reads, "Made in Italy for Lord and Taylor." Rear metal zipper. Size: 33-35" bust, 26" waist, MAX 38" hips. Approximately 57 1/2" from shoulder to hem. Condition: In very good condition. There are a few, ever so faint, small spots on the skirt. USD$685.


vintageous.com

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
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18-06-2007
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Descriptions are in Japanese... I love this coat!!



limt.jp

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limt.jp

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18-06-2007
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Ooooh - velvet!



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