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21-07-2007
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Unlined knit.


poshvintage.com

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
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21-07-2007
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Quote:
1970s Toggle coat.


poshvintage.com

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21-07-2007
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Dark Oatmeal Wool Boucle Dress and Matching Reversible Poncho/Cape Trimmed in Leather! One of the best Bonnie Cashin sets I've seen. The cape is reversible (if you remove the label - lucky for you the previous owner never removed it!!!) The cape has snap closures on either side to confirm reversibility. A five time Coty award winner, Bonnie Cashin is just starting to get the recognition she deserves as the museum retrospectives and honors continue to pour in. In the 1940's, Cashin designed costumes for 20th Century Fox. She worked on more than 60 films including Anna and the King of Siam, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and Laura. In the 1950's, she returned to New York, working for 24 years with manufacturer Phillip Sills to create "clothes for actual situations and living patterns, rather than trends". Her signature pieces include ponchos and natural fabrics such as tweed, leather and suede. This outfit is a classic Cashin! Label: A Bonnie Cashin Design, Sills & Company. This is a very tight fitted unlined knit dress trimmed in leather at the boat neckline, back zipper. The poncho/cape can be worn with collar up or down and it's reversible from wool boucle to black plush acrylic, both sides trimmed in leather. As classy as you can get! Excellent condition.. The color is closest to the photos of the black side of the cape, more a dark oatmeal, not as gold as shown in the other photos. The plush side is black as is the leather trim.


antiquedress.com

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21-07-2007
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gosh leather as a shirt or dress seems so nice.. i hope i can find thin white leather to dye myself Don't quite like the colour choices here--it's the very first pale steel blue that does it best for me and maybe also this red toggle one^ with the white trim here

thanks for the thread SomethingElse !

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22-07-2007
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I agree that her choice in colors is quite loud, in what I've seen so far. I keep thinking about popsicles in all sorts of flavors. But the geometry of her work is so pleasant!

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Late 1960s. All-weather coat of bright green cotton canvas, trimmed w/ lime green leather. The coat has a high round neckline, leather collar, full trapeze shaped body, and long sleeves. A thick vertically-appliqued panel runs down the right side in front and in back, connecting to a large leather patch hip pocket. The coat fastens with a metal stud closure at the center front. Cashin has adapted her classic formula for an all-purpose coat to the radical, youth-oriented style of the late '60s by shortening the coat's length, using a strong psychadelic color, and adding the leather panels and pocket to create a trompe l'oeil shoulder bag. Decorative leather trim was always a hallmark of her work, and as leather reached new heights of fashion in this period, she has felt free to expand it from collars and belts into a major design element. The pseudo-shoulder bag is also an inside joke, since Cashin skirts and coats often included built-in pocketbooks. Despite its references to the late '60s, the coat remains a classic that could easily be worn today. Label: A Bonnie Cashin Design for Sills.


beverlybirks.com

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by SomethingElse; 22-07-2007 at 10:18 AM.
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22-07-2007
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1965. Day coat of vibrant saffron yellow suede with a small collar, wide long sleeves, two large rectangular patch pockets edged with top stitching on the breasts, two hip pockets set into the side seams with their apertures emphasized by top-stitching, a frontal metal stud closure, trapezoid sil-houette with slightly flared back and long wide raglan sleeves under which one could comfortably wear a suit jacket. Suede in this strong colour is shocking today but at the time this was made, it was outrageous. The colour is much stronger in reality than it is in the photo. The geometric seam treatments and top-stitching combined with the metal stud closure give this a futuristic space age impact.


beverlybirks.com


Last edited by SomethingElse; 22-07-2007 at 10:18 AM.
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22-07-2007
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Thanks for the thread

Around 2000, before her death, I read a New York Times Magazine article on Bonnie Cashin, featuring images of her apartment.
It was the first and last time I ever read anything on her, wish I still had it.

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Last edited by DosViolines; 22-07-2007 at 11:31 AM.
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22-07-2007
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fashiontrac.com

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Her vintage pieces are as ageless as Dick Clark, and almost impossible to date, even by the experts. Therein lies her genius. A Cashin swing coat in a glorious explosion of pink, gold, and bronze plaid mohair could have been designed yesterday.

The Adler & Adler label is the earliest Cashin label. The Sills label tells us it was most likely designed 40 or 50 years ago. Cashin has done knitwear for Ballantyne, handbags for Coach and Meyers and a collection of outerwear for Russ Taylor.

Simply put (and simplicity was her signature, along with modern, unstructured clothes born in an era of corseted New Looks), Cashin clothes don't look vintage. They're the most wearable vintage investments of all.
Quote:
Bonnie Cashin for Adler & Adler
Attached Images
File Type: jpg adler.jpg (29.1 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg adler1.jpg (24.1 KB, 65 views)
File Type: jpg adler2.jpg (24.2 KB, 2 views)
File Type: jpg adler3.jpg (52.0 KB, 67 views)

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22-07-2007
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Poncho with gray flannel lining-Bonnie Cashin for Russ Taylor. From the collection of JB Hoffman.
fashiontrac.com

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File Type: jpg cashinponcho1.jpg (16.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg cashinponcho2.jpg (44.0 KB, 1 views)

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22-07-2007
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Here is one of the articles from the New York Times on Cashin.

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My Passion for Cashin: A Young Student Remembers Her Fashion Mentor, by Stephanie Day Iverson

When I met Bonnie Cashin nearly four years ago, I wore my first Cashin -- a turquoise leather coat that was designed in 1974, one year and a spring collection after I was born. The coat was the reason that Bonnie and I were meeting. I fell in love with its matching silk crepe lining and hip-height encirclement of pockets, designed for carrying books, the first day I saw it in the Sotheby's fashion department, where I worked as a researcher. I was also working on my M.A. at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design and Culture. Reading about Bonnie (who died in 2000 at the age of 84) and finding that little had been published about her nearly seven decades of costume and clothing design, I wanted her to be the subject of my thesis.
No one bid on the coat, and it was purchased for me as a surprise thank-you by my boss, Tiffany Dubin. Soon afterward, it was singled out in one post-auction review as a "tired" fashion that we made a mistake in trying to sell. (This, regarding a garment that has since elicited thoughtful compliments from jaded teenage boys in the midst of after-school reigns of terror on the subway.) When I voiced my interest in Bonnie, a chain of mutual friends managed an invitation for me to phone her. In a somewhat lengthy, lofty monologue, I told her about the coat and how I felt destined to redress historical neglect and contemporary misunderstanding and that it was critical that her creative life be documented and examined in its entirety! When I finished my speech, there was silence. Then laughter. She essentially told me to settle down and asked if I would like to join her for tea at her apartment.


Bonnie and I just clicked. Soon after our first meeting, we slipped into a teasing, loving, sisterly relationship. She called me Dodo or referred to me as "the big question mark." She also granted me exclusive and unrestricted access to her design archive, housed in a separate apartment below her residential space at United Nations Plaza. I would ring her bell and hear her sing, "Yoo-hoo, yoo-hoo, Stephanie," as she approached the door. We would give each other a quick peck, after which she would hand me the key to the archive and say, "See you later, kiddo."

My ongoing research in her studio is a zigzag treasure hunt through material pinned across bulletin boards, arranged around slide carousels, piled under and over tables and collected in baskets, portfolios, file cabinets, travel journals and closets. I plan to spend the next two years here finishing a book on Cashin. Among her gems, I've found her childhood sketches of annotated dance costumes and fashions -- filled in with colored pencils or watercolors -- showing the combined influences of her custom-dress maker mother, fashion magazines, fairy tales, ballet performances and a fascination with the Chinatowns of Los Angeles and San Francisco that filled her nomadic California childhood. Stacks of black-and-white photographs of smiling, sexy-but-sweet chorus girls are all that remain of Bonnie's first career as a dance costume designer for Fanchon & Marco, a troupe of line dancers, when she was 15 and still in high school and had to be driven to work in Los Angeles every night by her mother. The record of her late-1930's entry into ready-to-wear is in fashion spreads that Bonnie cut out from Vogue and Harper's Bazaar and pasted into floral-fabric-covered scrapbooks. She marked with small red-pencil checks the ensembles she "anonymously" designed. Articles from the war years explain Bonnie's appointments, first as a designer of Civilian Defense uniforms and then as one of 10 designers representing the best of American fashion in The New York Times's first-ever Fashions of The Times.

From her 1943-1949 tenure as a designer in the "glamour division" at 20th Century Fox, there are portfolios of oversize watercolor and ink illustrations, many labeled for a particular actress's on- or offscreen wardrobe, all foreshadowing the "real" clothing designs for which she would become most famous. From her decades in ready-to-wear, thick books of editorial commentary and annotated fashion sketches demonstrate how to layer tweed ponchos and suede Persian tunics, mohair Noh coats, funnel-necked cashmere sweaters and wool-jersey, leather-trimmed dresses, examples of which still hang in pink, orange and green closets.

She designed the clothes that she wanted and needed to wear for own modern, mobile, madcap lifestyle. A letter dashed off to her mother tells of a decision to "skip Amsterdam, it will always be there" in favor of traveling "to Russia, on a ship which stops briefly in Copenhagen and Stockholm and lands at Leningrad -- 4 days there -- then by train to Moscow. I'll fly from Moscow to London, then home. It sounds like a lark." Days later, a postcard teases: "Guess where we are -- extraordinary -- fabulous -- unbelievable -- feel wonderful. Approaching the glorious U.S.S.R. -- and about to be approached by the glorious custom officers who've just come aboard." Next, back in London, "went to the opening of 'Othello' at Covent Garden Opera . . . went to Ascot to the races Friday -- sunny wonderful day -- all the ladies in their big hats -- saw that Queen and her whole party close . . . have seen some good plays. Liberty is planning a Bonnie Cashin department -- all Sills things - . . . met a man from Lyle of Scott -- the cashmere sweater place -- Dior used to do a line for them and they might be interested in me doing something. I hope so -- I would like that."

As I sifted through Bonnie's past, curled up on her Nelson Marshmallow sofa or perched at her drafting table, Bonnie would pop down to "play" with stacks of fabric or occasionally, to my consternation, to weed through her piles and files of papers. As soon as I heard her tearing up documents, I would raise my head and demand to know what she was erasing from history. I was a constant interruption, incessantly pointing at things and asking just a "quick question." After learning "where on earth" I found something, she would tell me about relying on her mother to help her sew all night in order to meet a costume deadline for the Roxyettes, the precision dancers at New York's Roxy Theatre who were rivals of the Rockettes, or about a cocktail party at which she and Gypsy Rose Lee lounged in matching fur skirts that Bonnie had originally designed for Gene Tierney in "Laura."

We often chatted upstairs at her massive marble and iron table, seated on weightless wire garden chairs. We looked out over the U.N. or at the little island in the East River where she and Buckminster Fuller envisioned erecting a torch whose height would change according to the intensity of international conflicts. Subjects ranged from lamenting Seventh Avenue's aesthetic in-breeding to Bonnie's hope that I would date one of her "younger" friends. In the last year of her life, these afternoons became planning sessions. Word that I was culling information for a book on Bonnie had led to an invitation to co-curate a retrospective (held last September) of her career at the Fashion Institute of Technology with Dorothy Twining Globus, then its director.

Bonnie wanted this show to convey her design philosophy, best summed up in what she referred to as "a little ditty" by the Grateful Dead, pinned up over her desk, that advised "once in a while you get shown the light in the strangest places if you look at it right." Bonnie firmly believed that accepted practices and intended uses were not sacred. Metal toggles on the convertible top of her little red sports car became closures on the handbags she designed for Coach and dog-leash clasps allowed her to hitch up long skirts and carry cocktails up the stairs of her country house. Car blankets inspired her first ponchos, and upholstery fabric, leather and suede were her favorite materials for evening dress.

After seeing the show, one group of students commented that the clothes were wonderful but were just like what everyone sees every day. While missing the point that Bonnie was the originator of these familiar ideas and "looks," their summation attests to her unrecognized but tremendous influence today. Bonnie believed that she designed for her contemporary moment and disagreed that she was ahead of it. Such observations, she claimed, were really comments on the lack of innovation in current fashion. But the reality is that she was so avant-garde that her work of 25 or even 50 years ago seems reflective of our own time.
nytimes.com

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22-07-2007
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Here are the images that accompany the article above.

Quote:
Cashin's city view. All vases, plants and flowers by Anthony Todd.


Quote:
Cashin's living room, from far left: The 19th-century pigskin trunk, George Nelson Marshmallow sofa, Isamu Noguchi cocktail table and Eames chair are among the items that will be sold.


Quote:
Her office with sketches and paintings on packing material.


Quote:
Cashin's sweater closet, with Iverson in a 1972 Cashin vest; dress form, Fox Sewing Machine Inc.


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Her graffiti wall and fabric collage.


Quote:
Her grafitti wall.


Quote:
Bags circa 1968.


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Leather coat and calfskin jacket. At Keni Valenti Retro Couture. Hair: Enzo Laera for Judy Casey. Makeup: Onoda at Frame. Fashion assistant: Michael Niklaus. Photographs by Brigitte Lacombe; Styled by Barbara Turk.


nytimes.com

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22-07-2007
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Those are the images from the article, but I could've sworn she was still alive when I read it ...my memory isn't what it used to be

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29-07-2007
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1970s Bonnie Cashin Red Wool Dress with Snap Yoke

It doesn't take a rocket scientist to acknowledge the light Bonnie Cashin shed on and through the fashion industry but it does take a smart woman to wear Bonnie Cashin. You will never see a Hooters girl wearing Cashin - the brilliance of the design will go so over their bleached blonde head. The women you will see wearing Bonnie Cashin are busy women who love practical, well designed pieces that aren't trendy but have a distinctive look all their own. This red wool Jasco jersey dress has mother-of-pearl snaps along the shoulder, forming a fantastic yoke that comes down over the breastbone and upper back. You can also snap all of the snaps and have a slick funnelneck collar in which to nestle your pretty little chin. Trimmed in cherry red leather, it has demilune stitched pockets at both hips and slips on simply, over the head. We've paired this with a vintage Castelbajac leather belt so it's only natural that we think you should belt it with a wide brown belt - anything from Gucci to Halston ultrasuede will do. Made for Sills, the bust measures 38", shoulder to shoulder 16.5", outer sleeve 22.5", hips up to 41" and length 44". Excellent condition. $425.00

source: enokiworld.com

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29-07-2007
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1970s Bonnie Cashin Leather Trimmed Wool Dress

Long after the Japanese with their kimono and yukata but long before designers like Rick Owens and Dries Van Noten, Bonnie Cashin was Seventh Avenue's champion of layered dressing. Based on stylish practicality, Cashin's dresses, tunics, skirts and coats are meant to be piled on in infinite ways. A smart foundation piece, or a stand alone basic, this brown wool jersey dress has a large stand-up funnel collar and is trimmed in brown leather around the base of the neck. Zips in front to the hips with a big leather zipper pull, this is slightly body conscious without being sexy and looks smashing with leggings and Clergerie platform ballet shoes. Signature stitched demilune pockets on both side seams, this has a very contemporary scuba suit vibe. Made for Sills, the bust measures up to 38", shoulder to shoulder 17", hips up to 39", oiuter sleeve 21" and length 43". Excellent condition with the exception of a small, professional woven repair by the shoulder blade in back, the size of a grain of rice. sold

source: enokiworld.com

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29-07-2007
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1960s Bonnie Cashin Blue Suit with Leather Coat


A perky blueberry leather coat with matching wool jersey dress from Bonnie Cashin for Sills and Co.. The coat is fitted through the shoulders and upper bodice and then flares out at the waist, widening deeper at the hem. Under such a charming piece is a blue wool turtleneck dress that sashes at the waist with a matching blueberry leather shoestring belt. The cap sleeves are cut into the bodice and the coat is lined in blueberry silk and has those fantastic signature brass turnlock closures. Pair the dress with a different Cashin coat in lime green suede or just wear the coat with jeans and a tiny Chloe tee. Balanced so the turtleneck peeps out a litle at the band collar and a touch below the hem, if you've ever gotten this wrong it looks like you're wearing a coat over nothing but your birthday suit. Bonnie, of course, gets it right. Dress bust measures 38" and hips are 38" with a length of 39.5". Coat has a shoulder span of 16", outer sleeve 21" and length 36". Both are in excellent condition. sold

source: enokiworld.com
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