How to Join
the Fashion Spot / All Things Vintage / History of Style : a remembrance of things past
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
01-08-2006
  16
front row
 
vintageamour's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 293
rachel zoe, the stylist uses halston as inspiration for a lot of her outfits

__________________
http://www.lapetitefashionista.blogspot.com
My fashion blog, come visit! <3
  Reply With Quote
 
01-08-2006
  17
V.I.P.
 
Boomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Caught between the moon and New York City
Gender: homme
Posts: 22,356
Does anyone have some pics of Halston they could post? I have a hard time finding very many and I always liked his style: Tan, tux, slicked backed hair, ect...! he was a very impressive guy!

  Reply With Quote
02-08-2006
  18
Meg
inspired contemplation
 
Meg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: London by way of North America
Gender: femme
Posts: 17,064
Halston truly was an amazing designer and a genius. Completely agree about the vionnet comparison in regards to the bias cut. He was not afraid on any level of being different. I have a lovely vintage Halston dress

  Reply With Quote
02-08-2006
  19
backstage pass
 
stella-mayfair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 673
Halston Pic
@ Boomer: here's some halston pics for you

halston.jpg


sjcf_01_img0173.jpg


#1 courtesy of bacfilms.com, halston with studio 54's steve rubell
# 2 showing halston in 1979 with Martha Graham, Betty Ford, Elizabeth Taylor, and Liza Minnelli, all wearing gowns designed by him. pic courtesy of fashionencyclopedia.com

__________________
ooooh....aaaaah... FASHION!!!
David Bowie
  Reply With Quote
02-08-2006
  20
V.I.P.
 
liberty33r1b's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Manchester, UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 23,092
^wow, i've never actually seen any of these pics before, thanks for posting!

__________________
"he waited for other people to understand what he was doing, instead of doing what they wanted.
Balenciaga never compromised."
  Reply With Quote
02-08-2006
  21
V.I.P.
 
Boomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Caught between the moon and New York City
Gender: homme
Posts: 22,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by liberty33r1b
^wow, i've never actually seen any of these pics before, thanks for posting!
Yes!! I had been trying to find that Warhol in #12 forever!!!

  Reply With Quote
23-10-2006
  22
V.I.P.
 
BaroqueRockstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: i wish i knew
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,706
i was looking through firstview, and they had a few seasons of halston...
does anyone know if it's the same halston? IMO the new stuff isn't impressive at all...

__________________

  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  23
backstage pass
 
stella-mayfair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 673
maybe they are doing a "revival" as is happening to BIBA at the moment... (and btw, they totally lost the original idea...)

__________________
ooooh....aaaaah... FASHION!!!
David Bowie
  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  24
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,773
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaroqueRockstar
i was looking through firstview, and they had a few seasons of halston...
does anyone know if it's the same halston? IMO the new stuff isn't impressive at all...
Agree with about the quality, but can't answer your questions...I hate it when these brands get "revived", it rarely looks good anymore.

Halston was one of the great American fashion designers

__________________
"Because of all sorts of cloth have their motions, as well as Bodies, it must needs that they differ in themselves." -Lomazzo
  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  25
fashion icon
 
FashionJunkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: In A Black Hole
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,113
By Carina Chocano
Sept. 17, 1999 | Before she discovered the look that would enduringly and amusingly define her throughout the rest of her life -- that is, before she became the fabulously besequined "Liza!" -- Liza Minelli was a marmot-eyed, slightly hirsute, terminally insecure star-pup without a thing to wear. Then she met Halston.





Say what you will about beaded tunics, billowing caftans, halter pantsuits and Ultrasuede shirtdresses. His clothes, whose pervasive influence can still be seen in the designs of Donna Karan, Calvin Klein and Narciso Rodriguez, were different from anything that had been done before. And if, as Halston often repeated, "you are only as good as the people you dress," then he was very, very good. Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Babe Paley, Lauren Bacall, Liz Taylor, Barbara Walters, Betty Ford, the Duchess of Marlborough and Katherine Graham were all among his friends and clients.
Halston's influence on American fashion goes beyond his designs -- he took an era, reupholstered it in Ultrasuede, dabbed "Halston" on its pulse points and made it his own. A new book, "Halston: An American Original," by Elaine Gross and Fred Rottman -- which features interviews with those who knew, loved and emulated him, as well as 225 photos, some from top fashion photographers -- pays tribute to a completely original designer who, without any formal fashion training, changed the way the world dressed forever.
The first international fashion superstar -- and possibly the best designer America has ever had -- Halston was a master of detail, cut and finishing. His devotion to simplicity and elegance of line was so pure that he zealously avoided such frippery as zippers and buttons. More than construction, however, what Halston understood best was stardom -- how to fabricate, showcase and exploit it -- and how to hold people in its sway. In the mid-'70s, at the height of his success, Halston -- an international legend and the king of New York nightlife -- had the power to make women across the globe aspire to resemble hypertrophied drag queens wrapped in towels. He had the power to make Princess Grace of Monaco let herself be photographed in sky-blue Ultrasuede. He had the power to make the muumuu a must-have, because it was just about the only thing that still looked good on Elizabeth Taylor when she was expanding at a faster rate than the Crab Nebula. He even had the power to make it OK for dozens of Manhattan socialites to show up at Le Cirque wearing the same dress (the famed model No. 704, a knee-length, belted, Ultrasuede shirt, which the New York Times called a "status security blanket") and think it simply divine.
"The herd instinct is the new chic!" wrote Eugenia Sheppard. "It's like belonging to a club!"
Nowadays, when the Gap can get "everybody in vests" one month and "everybody in cords" the next, this may not seem extraordinary. But fashion and fame have changed since the late '60s and '70s. Ironically, Halston was instrumental -- both through his designs and his business decisions -- in bringing about the changes that would ultimately lead to his own demise. As much as Halston came to symbolize modernity in the '70s, and as much as he would usher in the future of fashion, he was, in many ways, old school. He truly believed that "fashion is not made by designers, it is made by fashionable people." He would never understand that eventually fashion would be made by business people, and that would be his undoing.
Born Roy Halston Frowick in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1932, Halston was voted "healthiest baby" at the Iowa State Fair. He always knew he wanted to be a milliner, and began creating hats -- much to his family's bafflement -- at a very early age. Like Coco Chanel, who also began her career as a milliner, Halston always understood the importance of having well-connected friends. In Steven Gaines' dishy 1990 biography, "Simply Halston: The Untold Story," Halston's brother Bob recalls: "In high school, my brother was driven around by rich girls in convertibles." After moving to Chicago following an abbreviated stint at the Indiana University, Halston became involved with "Basil of the Ambassador," a well-known celebrity hairstylist. It was through his stormy relationship with Basil that Halston first met milliner Lilly Daché, who would eventually give him his first New York job. Within a year of arriving in New York and becoming the new best friend of several influential fashion magazine editors and publishers, Halston, as he now called himself, left Daché's studio to become head milliner for the luxury department store Bergdorf Goodman.
By the time he was 30, Halston had already won his first of five Coty Fashion Critics Awards, and had managed to convince Bergdorf's to sew his name onto the labels of his hats -- a privilege the department store had never granted another designer. He designed the pillbox hat Jackie Kennedy wore to the presidential inauguration -- which made him internationally famous.
In 1966, determined to quit hats and go into the ready-to-wear business (which he correctly saw as the wave of the future), Halston was surprised to find that many of the rich socialites and famous celebrities who absolutely adored him and thought him an absolute genius were unwilling to finance his dressmaking venture. He was eventually able to set up shop in 1968, thanks to an investment of $125,000 from a Mrs. Estelle Marsh of Amarillo, Texas -- a distinctly unfabulous and, apparently, somewhat doughy lady whom Halston privately referred to as Mrs. Marshmallow. Out of necessity, Halston turned his then-unfashionable Madison Avenue locale into an exotic, orchid-strewn oasis unlike anything in the Garment District -- and subsequently into the preferred hangout of ladies who lunch but don't fund.

(from about.com)

__________________
"Très Très Cool Et Très Très Chic"
  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  26
fashion icon
 
FashionJunkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: In A Black Hole
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,113
Halston: An American Original





Book Description

When I think of my beloved friend, the five words I think of are these: elegant, fashionable, generous, supportive, decent. I thank you, Halston.
-- Liza Minnelli
No American designer since Claire McCardell has had such an impact on redefining fashion as Halston. His designs have experienced a tremendous revival and are as popular today as they were when he was alive. This is the first extensive look at Halston and his contributions to the fashion world, starting with his days as a milliner; through the explosion of his clothing lines and licensing deals, to the sale of his name and trademark and his theatrical designs for Liza Minnelli and the Martha Graham Dance Company.
This comprehensive survey of Halston's work is based on exclusive interviews with the people who knew and worked with Halston throughout his turbulent career. They include such celebrity Halston fans as Liza Minnelli, Katherine Graham, and Angelica Huston as well as industry insiders such as Marc Bohan, Stan Herman, Valerie Steele, and contemporary designers who claim Halston as an inspiration for their designs. Joe Eula and Kenneth Paul Block contribute their original sketches, as do manyy well-known fashion photographers.
With more than two hundred photographs Halston: An American Original is the quintessential volume for all fans of Halston and lovers of fashion.

Product Details
  • Hardcover: 236 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers (September 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 0060193182
  • Product Dimensions: 1.0 x 10.2 x 12.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.40 pounds
(from amazon.com) Here's the link:

http://www.amazon.com/Halston-Americ.../dp/0060193182

__________________
"Très Très Cool Et Très Très Chic"
  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  27
V.I.P.
 
Boomer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Caught between the moon and New York City
Gender: homme
Posts: 22,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteLinen
Halston was one of the great American fashion designers
How true! And, sadly, we have an entire generation here that never even heard of him..He was THE best for many years..Such a sad story... (And his clothes can still stop traffic today!!)

And thanks for the book info; I've been meaning to send for it for a while now!!

  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  28
fashion icon
 
FashionJunkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: In A Black Hole
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,113
Shirtwaist dress, 1972
Halston (Roy Halston Frowick) (American, 1932–1990)
Lavender Ultrasuede
Gift of Faye Robson, 1993 (1993.351ab)




(metmuseum.org)

__________________
"Très Très Cool Et Très Très Chic"
  Reply With Quote
24-10-2006
  29
chaos reigns
 
ultramarine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Costa Rica
Gender: homme
Posts: 6,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteLinen
Agree with about the quality, but can't answer your questions...I hate it when these brands get "revived", it rarely looks good anymore.

Halston was one of the great American fashion designers
Halston lost his name -as a designer- to the investors a looong time ago -he still lived at the time- ... I dont think someone can get his aesthetic ,,,

__________________
Have you rated this thread yet?
  Reply With Quote
25-10-2006
  30
Amour Comme Hiver
 
KhaoticKharma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 5,397
Queen Latifah wears Halston often... the new stuff would be acceptable for some other brand or a new designer, but not for the name Halston.




[style.com]

__________________
"I say, let's have happy clothes. You could reply that's frivolous in this troubled world, but do you really think dressing like an existential nun with suicidal thoughts is going to solve Bosnia?"

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
halston
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 AM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.