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27-08-2007
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1933- Emanuel Ungaro
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Emanuel (Maffeolit) Ungaro (born 1933 in Aix-en-Provence) is a French fashion designer. Born to Italian parents who had fled to France from Brindisi because of the fascist Italian government. As a young boy, Emanuel Ungaro took to sewing like his father, Cosimo.

At the age of 22, he moved to Paris and three years later, he began designing for the House of Cristobal Balenciaga for three years before quitting to work for Courrèges. Four years later, in 1965 with the assistance of Swiss artist Sonja Knapp, Emanuel Ungaro opened his own fashion house in Paris. In 1988, at the age of 55, he married Laura Bernabei.

The House of Emanuel Ungaro: In 1968, he created his first pret-a-porter collection, Parallèle and opened a boutique at 2, avenue Montaigne in Paris. During the next 30 years, the Emanuel Ungaro House expanded to include boutiques and licencing agreements worldwide.

Nastassja Kinski in a commercial from 1987 for Senso perfume
Ungaro launched his first menswear collection, Ungaro Uomo, in 1973, and his first perfume, Diva, 10 years later in 1983. Later followed the perfumes Senso (1987), Ungaro (1991) and Emanuel Ungaro For Men (1991).

In 1996, he formed a partnership with Salvatore Ferragamo. In 1997, Emanuel Ungaro, Salvatore Ferragamo and Bulgari created a new company: Emanuel Ungaro Parfums. The new perfumes to follow was Fleur de Diva (1997), Desnuda (2001) and Apparition (2004).

In 2005 the brand Emanuel Ungaro was sold to Pakistan-born internet tycoon, Asim Abdullah head of Global Asset Capital Investment Bank. At the time, the total wholesale revenue of products sold under the Ungaro label through licensing deals was approximately € 70 million.
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Dress c. 1966.

This A-line shift dress, part of a chic ensemble, was featured in Vogue in March 1966. It is short and sleeveless with a square neck. The horizontal stripes of the short, double-breasted jacket contrast with the vertical lines of the dress. The buttons are custom made to match the colours of the stripes.

Ungaro was born in Aix-en-Provence to Italian parents. He learnt tailoring by working for his father, then set off for Paris to start up on his own. Here he became friends with Courrèges, who introduced him to Balenciaga. Ungaro worked for Balenciaga for six years, then quit to join Courrèges. They collaborated for just two seasons before Ungaro set up his own Paris studio in 1965 with the textile designer Sonja Knapp.

His first collection was notable for its hard-edged clothes in heavy fabrics. Like Courrèges, Ungaro favoured geometric shift dresses worn with short jackets or coats. In 1966 his Spring collection attracted attention for its vibrant fabrics. These were designed by Sonja Knapp and manufactured by the Italian firm Nattier.

By 1968 Ungaro was producing a ready-to-wear line called 'Parallèle' which he sold from the ground floor of his couture showroom on the Avenue Montaigne.


wikipedia.org . vam.ac.uk

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 27-08-2007 at 01:49 PM.
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27-08-2007
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Black and cream wool and silk dress, c. 1967-68.

Two huge printed marigolds designed by Sonja Knapp decorate the skirt of this mini dress, front and back. The cream coloured wool fabric was made by the Italian firm Nattier. The collar and sleeves, which look like a blouse, are in fact attached to the dress.


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27-08-2007
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Orange, brown and cream gabardine mini dress, c. 1968.

The undulating orange and brown print contrasts with the cleancut shape of this dress. Ungaro's bold approach to colour distinguishes his clothes from those of other Parisian designers. The dress, of thick, coat-like material, fastens with a zip at the centre back and comes with a matching pair of hot pants to wear underneath.


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27-08-2007
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Evening ensemble, ca. 1990–92. Gray silk crepe and gray silk chiffon;.

Emanuel Ungaro's classical gown, like the magnificent peplos and capacious himation befitting the noblest Olympian goddess, is discrete in its coverage. With the attributes of the Greco-Roman gods so clearly defined, it is possible to ascribe mythic identities to contemporary garments even in the absence of explicit identifications. Current notions of classical dress are surprising in the breadth of their parameters. They are based in part on the original variations and manipulations of the antique models, the attributes accrued to it over time by artistic convention, and the twentieth-century adaptation of ancient methods to modern forms. That the dress of people two-and-a-half millennia in the past can imbue a design of today with the aura of myth and timeless beauty suggests that the classical mode, like Penelope's weaving, is continuous and without end.


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27-08-2007
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I absolutely LOVE this one!

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Ensemble, 1967. White elasticized net with allover appliqués of white braid trefoils.

In an evaluation of the Paris lines of 1960, Vogue fashion reporter Jessica Daves noted that they were "designed for very young women who are intensely concentrated on fashion, who expect to 'change the line' with frequency and rapidity, and who are possessed of superb legs and slim, young goddess figures." Although she was speaking specifically of Yves Saint Laurent's work for the House of Dior, her appraisal would prove increasingly cogent to the dominance of the body itself in defining the fashionable silhouette of the 1960s. With the introduction of the miniskirt, the leg was revealed to above the knee. A short shift was the dominant form mid-decade, and hung only on the frame of the body. As fashion's last absolute decree entered its concluding phase, skirts became shorter and shorter until they atrophied into short shorts, or, in the phrase of the day, hot pants.
The body-conscious silhouette is expressed here by Emanuel Ungaro, a haute couture designer who proved quite skilled at adapting streetwear to high fashion. This playsuit with matching leggings is made with elastic fabric that has been hand-appliquéd with white braid. The base fabric provides not a foundation but a revelation of the ideal body, which is in turn the ideal silhouette.
During the 1960s, as skirts became shorter and shorter, they atrophied into short shorts, or, in the phrase of the day, hot pants. In this couture playsuit with matching leggings, the elastic fabric has been hand-appliquéd with white braid. In the youth-impassioned tumult of the time, there was an equivocation between Warhol superstar and couture client. As self-consciously insurrectionist as the political gesture is, the craft of the garment is, like Chanel's "little black dress," traditional.


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27-08-2007
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I really adore his more recent work for his couture line. F/w 01 and s/s 02 were particularly stunning examples of his exotic clashes and romantic femininity.

f/w 01




s/s 02



style.com

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27-08-2007
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Lovely ^ and the homage to the Fortuny and the Grecian drape is marvelous... Does anyone happen to know whether Ungaro has ceased designing clothes? I'm aware that he may still have a nose in the creation of fragrence, but I wonder whether he really is creating couture at this point.

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny

Last edited by SomethingElse; 27-08-2007 at 08:31 PM.
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14-10-2007
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I'm not sure this is an Ungaro's one, I asked to somethingelse(thank you very much for the beautifuls documents of this thread!)...who kindly answered: "you may post it, if someone known if it's one or it is not..."
Illustrated from a B&W editorial, before 1990.(watercolor)


copyright bi-aru

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14-10-2007
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something else, i love all these 60s designer threads you start!

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14-10-2007
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Originally Posted by SomethingElse View Post
I absolutely LOVE this one!

metmuseum.org
Yes, I agree with you somethingelse, I really like it too!

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09-11-2007
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Editorial "Bazaar" France, 1990 - photo: Terence Donovan

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19-11-2007
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I love his work at the 90's.. it was so inspiring to me..

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23-07-2014
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Vogue Paris March 1971
"Des collections '71"
Models & Designers: Vivanne, Margrit Ramme, Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin, Emmanuel Ungaro & Marc Bohan
Photographer: Helmut Newton
Hair: Jean-Louis David



ciaovogue.blogspot.com

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