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06-02-2007
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I can't thank you enough TAZ for those quotes.
They are revealing, frightening and inspiring. A rare sensitive genius that we sorely miss these days of overproduced fodder for the magazines.
A world away from his contemporary's quotes, Count Lagerfeld.

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15-02-2007
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Yahoo News:
by Emsie Ferreira Wed Feb 14, 10:06 PM ET


BERLIN (AFP) - A biting documentary about the twilight years of Yves Saint Laurent's haute couture fashion house screened at the Berlin Film Festival after a court blocked its release in France.
The French designer bid a graceful "adieu" to fashion after 44 years in 2002 with a show at which Catherine Deneuve sang and other famous clients and muses wept in the front row.
"Celebration" by Olivier Meyrou goes behind the scenes to show a much less elegant world in which Saint Laurent walks around in a daze.
The designer, who is credited with putting women in tuxedos, peacoats and sheer chiffon blouses, is losing his sharp eye and depends on his helpers who treat him like a child.
Shoes don't fit, silver dresses turn out grey and the seamstresses gossip but not as much as his close associates.
The camera captures it all, including staff members conferring about which dress house model Laetitia Casta should wear "because her breasts look too big in that one".
The film includes footage of an interview with a journalist in New York in which the famously tortured Saint Laurent declares that he has decided to "be happy and to work with joy."
Pierre Berge, his former lover who ran the business side of the fashion house, then tells the same journalist that this will never happen, nor does he want it to.
"He will never be rid of his demons, never be happy, and so much the better. He is like a sleepwalker and we must not wake him up. I set in place all the right conditions to keep him in this trance," he says.
At a birthday lunch, Berge makes a toast in which he tells the designer and his guests that fashion has destroyed him.
After the film was completed in 2001, Berge went to court in France and managed to prevent its commercial distribution. Meyrou was also ordered to pay a fine.
The director's previous films includes gritty documentaries about apartheid and the gay world.
He said in a press statement here that he wanted to show the secret life of Saint Laurent with the film which was originally called "5 Avenue Manceau" after the Paris address of the fashion house.
"He is a unique artist whose personality and life are, however, a mystery."
In the end only Loulou de la Falaise, the designer's discreet long-time collaborator, and the clothes themselves emerge from the picture unscathed.
Meyrou includes long scenes of "the little hands," as French seamstresses are known, struggling to pleat a velvet bodice or moaning as they pin a dress but they always manage to get it right.
The documentary is screening in the Panorama fringe section of the 57th Berlinale which runs until Sunday.

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18-02-2007
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thanks Bidwell for bringing this, this sounds a little bit harsh on the fragile old man, here is another review on the movie:

Quote:
In slow motion: Olivier Meyrou's "Celebration" (Panorama Dokumente)

This film is craziness itself, starting with the director, Olivier Meyrou. After the screening he explains how the project came about. He wanted to make a movie that would show the "celebration" of a fashion designer who is acclaimed throughout the world. A crazy concept, because Meyrou couldn't care less about fashion. All he's interested in is the "myth" surrounding a world that has nothing to do with him. A friendly, harmless fellow in jeans and a sweatshirt, Meyrou tells with a shudder of the atmosphere in Saint Laurent's offices. "As soon as you come in from the street, it's as if everything is in slow motion. People whisper and walk around on tiptoes before the weakling Yves Saint Laurent, who dominates everything." The etiquette was so foreign to him that he didn't dare ask the man any questions. Instead he filmed other journalists interviewing the fashion king.

Equally crazy is Pierre Berge, Saint Laurent's partner, who initially approved the project.

Shooting began in 1998, at a time when Saint Laurent was simply no longer presentable, a physical wreck, psychologically gaga. At one point a television team waits for him. The journalist is worried. She wants to talk with him about his "emotions". But is he going to show up at all? There's a huge hullaballoo, Saint Laurent's spokeswoman is under such pressure that the viewer cringes. The employees whisper and stare while Pierre Berge tries to lure Saint Laurent from his room upstairs. And then he comes. Berge walks in front of him, the camera follows. His shoulders slumped and his head hanging, he scuffles along the corridor and down the stairs behind Berge. A huge mirror hangs in the landing. Saint Laurent twists his head and leaps in panic to one side. He must have walked by this mirror a thousand times!

Later we see him interviewed by a French journalist. He has decided to make a new start. "I've decided to cast away my fears." He sticks out his upper lip. "I've decided to enjoy my life, and take pleasure in my work." A shy smile, again his upper lip is protruded. A coquettish old man pouting like a seventeen year old girl. But the most alarming thing about the film is that this ghastly atmosphere was not created by Berge, or any other businesslike men in suits. They have not transformed the employees into servants and the creative genius Saint Laurent into a spectre. Saint Laurent himself has created this atmosphere. Everyone is afraid of him. Even Berge is afraid of him. Berge's mouth twitches just like Saint Laurent's.

No wonder all this was foreign to Meyrou. How could it be otherwise? Nevertheless he must be reproached for his lack of interest in Saint Laurent's metier. The clothes remain completely in the background, and this degrades everyone who works on them, the seamstresses, couturiers, even Loulou de Falaise, to abject, obsequious slaves. Their pride remains incomprehensible, bizarre. The film can't be shown in France, on Saint Laurent's orders.

Anja Seeliger

"Celebration". Director: Olivier Meyrou. France, 2006, 74 mins (Panorama Dokumente)


signandsight.com


Last edited by taz; 18-02-2007 at 10:29 PM.
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16-03-2007
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thefrock

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16-03-2007
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16-03-2007
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Cocktail dress by Yves Saint Laurent, 1967/8, worn by Dame Margot Fonteyn de Arias

museumofcostume.co.uk
Attached Images
File Type: jpg moc7_1e.jpg (19.6 KB, 459 views)

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17-03-2007
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Old Yves Saint Laurent clothing is so easy to find in vintage shops, but that's great. It can be worn on and on. I love his gowns a lot, but the every day pieces, specifically the blouses, are my favorites.

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17-03-2007
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Mémoire de la mode: Yves Saint Laurent
Éditions Assouline
Pierre Bergé





Source: my scans

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(continued)






Source: my scans

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(continued)





Source: my scans

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17-03-2007
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Beautiful photographs, thank you La bordélique

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17-03-2007
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Thank you La bordélique

nytimes

Quote:
February 25, 2007
Past Present
Glamour, Mon Amour


Don Ashby, left; Richard Kalvar/Magnum photo
Rich satin at Prada, left; vintage Saint Laurent jewel tones.

By SUZY MENKES

The soundtrack was not the Beatles telling us, “All you need is love.” But that seemed to be the message from the sweet maidens in gauzy layers toting bags filled with wildflowers. On those totes, at the Louis Vuitton show, were the elegant, elongated letters spelling out “LOVE.” Now, where have I seen that before?

It didn’t take much fashion I.Q. to realize that Vuitton’s designer, Marc Jacobs, had “appropriated” Yves Saint Laurent’s symbol of the 1970s — the same one that Saint Laurent had used annually for his end-of-year greetings. Just add an “o” and an “e” to the LV logo, and voilà!

Since Jacobs is a past master at downloading sound bites of fashion history and shuffling them as if on an iPod, this foray into the YSL archives might have warranted only a shrug. But this was not the only reference to the Saint Laurent oeuvre this spring. The ideas kept popping up — and from cutting-edge designers. Five years after the iconic couturier retired, it seems that the fashion world is still mad about Yves.

The most outright homage was from Miuccia Prada, whose Africa-meets-1940s collection of ethnic prints as well as tunics and turbans paid obeisance to some of Saint Laurent’s most famous pieces. It may be hard to find a black model on the runway these days — even if it was YSL who kicked off that multiethnic attitude — but after a decade of ignoring tribal folklore, at least that trend is finally making a comeback.

Prada herself has been a YSL aficionado since her university days, when his vision suited her Marxist ideology and her debating appearances. Whereas the square shoulders of the 1940s were last seen in the YSL pantsuit (famously known as the power suit) throughout the 1980s, they came from a complex inspiration, as the young Saint Laurent recreated the vision of his adored mother in the war years. The French, still raw over defeat and collaboration, rejected the short, square, turban-topped silhouette that Saint Laurent first sent out for summer 1971; there may be more takers for Prada’s version, a vivid duchesse-satin tunic. Especially if it’s worn with a skirt, instead of the underpants it was shown with on the runway.

In her Miu Miu line, Prada proved that if you mix the 1940s with Africana, you get a striking take on a print; her dresses managed to look both graphic and tribal. Now, sophisticated tribal arts may sound like an oxymoron, this despite Picasso’s infatuation with African art and the French love affair with
Josephine Baker in the 1920s. But it took Saint Laurent, who was born in North Africa, to embrace tribalism in haute couture. His linear patterns and fantastic neck pieces produced a culture shock in 1967, when Paris was already stirring with a youth revolution.

Did Riccardo Tisci, who was not even born in 1967, give a backward glance to YSL when he created his latest collection for Givenchy?

The African patterns, played out in black and cream, with striped hose and patterned shoes, all had a multiethnic feel. Similarly, at Lanvin, Alber Elbaz, who himself had a brief stint at YSL, blended ethnicity and futurism in a delicate mix. He incorporated the look of tribal neck pieces into his shiny dresses and then furthered the idea with breastplate pendants, disk jewelry and giant hoop earrings. Elbaz, at least, had the courage to show some of these creations on African models.

Nobody knows how it is that individual designers can reach into their personal wellspring of creativity and yet come out with exactly what the next guy is doing. It’s what the French call capturing l’air du temps, or what we think of as the fashion vibe. You could read the fashion tea leaves and see the African influence as a reflection of escalating tribal warfare. On the other hand, maybe it’s as simple as a couple of designers flicking through the archives of the 20th century and alighting on the same source. As that Louis Vuitton tote bag might have said: we love YSL.


AP photo, left; Don Ashby
Tribal futurism at Lanvin, right; Saint Laurent’s African-style dress from 1967.



Don Ashby; Alain Dejean/Sygma/Corbis
Love, Louis Vuitton style, left; Saint Laurent’s nonconformist wedding dress from 1970.

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Last edited by DosViolines; 17-03-2007 at 09:55 AM.
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18-03-2007
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karma for you guys, I felt lonly for a while here in this thread .

thanks for these vintage dresses DosViolines.

thanks alot La bordélique , you have scanned the whole book great effort.

& thanks DosViolines for the article, it is true since Yves retirment I've seen alot of homage to YSL during the fashion weeks, starting with Jean Paul Gaultier, last Dior Homme fall collection by Hedi, Lanvin, Prada, V&R, Frida Giannini, the recent shows by G. Valli & M. Jacob & Galliano latest show for Dior where he showed the Trapez 'A' line & the 'Y' line which was invented by young Yves when he was there at DIOR.

you can wear alot of YSL without going to the ' rive gauche ' boutiques, which puts Pilati in alot of competetion.

it is intresting to see Yves effect even if he is not there in the fashion scene anymore.


Last edited by taz; 18-03-2007 at 02:47 AM.
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18-03-2007
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I find these Yves's quotes are a good explaination to the above article :

Quote:

"There is a feeling of frustration in fashion with things that only last a season and die. I try, as I advance, to make something that will last, that will be passed from one generation to another."
-- Saint Laurent, 1978


"I'm happy that people are inspired by what I have done. It proves that a mode passes, but true style resists. And let's be honest, not many couturiers have their own style,"

"I'm happy to be copied, otherwise I wouldn't be doing my job well."
-- Saint Laurent, 1998


"It may not succeed, but it will have an effect."
-- Saint Laurent, describing his 1986 fall couture collection.



Last edited by taz; 18-03-2007 at 03:12 AM.
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