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16-11-2008
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i've just seen one of the MOST emotional tv coverage of his death ....
i once again cried .... it was purely beautiful. strong et pas racoleur. simple. brut. amazing.
pierre bergé talking about the day he learnt YSL woud die ... without any sound. YSL portraits by Warhol behind him.
bergé and deneuve talks during his funeral. BEAUTIFUL.
Carla Bruni walking at his Beaubourg hommage show in this yellow cape .... some archives images .... i cried again ... soooooooo bouleversant !

that was really touching ....

Yves I will never leave you. Has we ever been seperated ? To leave you, Yves, I want to tell you my admiration, my deep respect and my love - Pierre Bergé


and there i was in tears ....... and was still crying when i saw his art collections. i'll die in tears again in front of such a collection ....

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20-11-2008
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i've heard this morning on the radio that Alain Chamfort is about to mak a new album ... the concept will be songs that tell YSL's biography ......

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23-11-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BerlinRocks View Post
... the concept will be songs that tell YSL's biography ......
this is intresting thanks for the news ,, now I wonder if there would be a movie about Yves, who would be perfect to play his role?

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27-11-2008
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Quote:
Yves Saint Laurent: Eternal Style

"San Francisco is a Saint Laurent town," says Pierre Bergé who introduced the YSL retrospectve which is making its only US pitstop at the De Young Museum in San francisco.

Text by Jana Balik Fitzgerald | Published 25 November 2008

Pierre Bergé, partner in both life and business of Yves Saint Laurent, introduced the late designer's retrospective at the De Young Museum by remarking "San Francisco is a Saint Laurent town." The traveling exhibit, with San Francisco as its only stop in the United States, is the first public showing of the famed designer's work since his death in June. The collection includes 130 articles of clothing on loan from Foundation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, spanning 40 years of perhaps the most prolific fashion career of the 20th century. The exhibit is curated by Florence Muller, fashion historian and professor at the Institut Francais de la Mode a Paris, Dianne Charbonneau, curator of contemporary decorative arts at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and Jill D'Alessandro, associate curator of textiles at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Muller participated in a symposium with Hamish Bowles, European Editor-at-Large and Farid Cheroune, fashion historian and author, on the opening day, tracing the influences and impact of the Algerian-born designer. Bowles spoke of the revolutionary designs of the 1970s, embracing the hippy spirit that resonates with San Francisco's radical history. He noted the importance and enduring influence of Saint Laurent's training at the House of Christian Dior, after becoming a protégé at the tender age of 19 and taking on the head position after Dior's death just two years later. The trapeze dress, firmly planted at the beginning of the exhibit, references the looks he created at Dior. Though his career may have begun in the famed Parisian couture house, he embarked on building a unique place in fashion history. The establishment of his own label, later followed by Rive Gauche, ushered in pret-a-porter, or ready-to-wear, making stylish clothing readily available to the masses. "Fashion is not haute couture," he famously said.

Farid Cherounne, author of Smoking Forever, spoke of the enduring influence of the famous Le Smoking look of 1966. If Chanel gave women freedom, he said, "YSL gave them power." For the first time, a man's tuxedo was adopted for the female form. The exhibit shows several designs of the Le Smoking look, evocative of the sexual revolution of the 1960s. Revolutionary they may be, but these clothes are timeless. "Le Smoking" continues to be an influence in women's fashion, and this silhouette appears again and again in the work of YSL.

The exhibition itself is appropriately divided into four themes, tracking the designers stylistic development and maturation. "Masterful Pencil Strokes" represent his skillful illustration and incredible attention to detail. Drawings done on graph paper are displayed on the walls of the museum, with swatches of fabric adorning their corners, bearing the signature of the designer. "The YSL Revolution" displays perhaps the most well known works: the safari outfit worn by Veruschka, a pea coat from 1996, several Le Smoking looks. These make up the oeuvre of a designer that continues to be a point of reference for fashion designers. Perhaps the most meaningful is the "Lyrical Sources" portion, which highlights Saint Laurent's love for art and literature and pays homage to Matisse, Picasso and Van Gogh. He famously loved Proust, and designed the Mondrian dress that graced the pages of every major magazine in the 1960s.

"The Palette" shows a more playful side to the designer, embracing bright colors and fanciful journeys to far-away lands; tunics and African prints, bolero jackets and kimonos. The Ballets Russes collection of 1976, for example, was conceived without ever setting foot in Russia. Painfully shy, Saint Laurent did not travel often, but was able to evoke such exotic locations with the stroke of a pen. "I hate traveling. I exercise my imagination on the lands I do not know. That is how I take my most wonderful trips."

At the end of the exhibit, the gift store separates these clothes from a small white room. Three dresses stand in the middle, and a chronology of the designer's work is plastered on the wall. As you enter the room, the faint sound of that unmistakable French is audible. A distinctly gentle voice, belonging to a lithe and delicate frame, carefully answers each question of the Proust Questionnare. The museum had looped a tape recording of this interview for the occasion. Such an intimate space concludes the exhibit, providing insight into his character and private life in a way that perhaps no still or moving image can.

During the symposium, Muller spoke of the relevance of these clothes in the contemporary fashion world, and the impossible dream of designers to become the next Yves Saint Laurent. Marc Jacobs, Yohji Yamamoto, Alber Elbaz, Dries Van Noten and Jean Paul Gaultier are among those who take nods from the eponymous line. "Eternal Style" could not be a more appropriate sentiment for a designer whose revolutionary and skillful aesthetic cemented the cultural and social importance of fashion. As he once famously said, "Fashion passes, style remains."
dazeddigital
image gallery

De Young YSL exhibition's tribute page
http://www.ysldeyoung.org/

exhibition from 1.11.2008 > 4.5.2009

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27-11-2008
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i just found that wonderful documentary of ysl, preparing the hc collection 2000

www.youtube.com/watch?v=cl5li-sf6SY&feature=related

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11-12-2008
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it's so easy to see why everyone, both men and women alike, were so enamoured by yves saint laurent. he was such a walking contradiction in so many ways yet the sum of all his parts culminated into this alluring, enigmatic and brilliant being that only yves saint laurent could be. he will always be dearly missed but never forgotten.

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11-12-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinksofa View Post
i just found that wonderful documentary of ysl, preparing the hc collection 2000
i watched this entire documentary and while i was obviously amazed by the breathtaking couture, i was taken aback and truly in awe of the power he conveys with his mere presence, how he could communicate SO much by doing/saying so little.


Last edited by gius; 16-04-2009 at 10:30 PM. Reason: removed video link
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16-12-2008
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Does anybody know why it's not possible to see the whole collections in this page?
http://www.fondation-pb-ysl.net/site/Home-page-387.html

I remember some time ago I could see all of them, what happens now?

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29-01-2009
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Why Yves Saint Laurent was never happy

As Pierre Bergé, partner of the great designer, prepares to auction their art collection, he reveals YSL's struggle with depression



By Celia Walden
Last Updated: 9:14PM GMT 29 Jan 2009

Partners for 50 years: the late Yves Saint Laurent with Pierre Berge Photo: John Van Hasselt/CORBIS SYGMA


There are few female pleasures more finely distilled than slipping on a jacket or dress made by a truly great designer. As one of the most revered stylists of the 20th century, the late Yves Saint Laurent dispersed that joy liberally and will continue to do so, through his designs, despite his death in June last year. Now, the man who spent half a century as his lover and business partner has revealed the cost of that creativity on the designer’s mental health.
“Designing made him deeply miserable,” says Pierre Bergé, who co-founded the YSL couture house with Saint Laurent in 1961. “Sadly, Yves was not built for joy. He was an unhappy person who didn’t have a taste for life. Occasionally, he was happy, but life was difficult for him. The depression ran deep.”
We are in Bergé’s office on the first floor of the Fondation Saint Laurent on Avenue Marceau to discuss his decision to sell off the art collection the couple spent 50 years amassing. In what is being called “the sale of the century”, 730 pieces – including Old Master drawings, Renaissance bronzes and works by Ingres, Géricault, Frans Hals, Picasso, Matisse, Braque, Léger and Mondrian – from Saint Laurent’s apartment will go under the hammer at Christie’s next month. They are expected to fetch about £240 million.
Bergé, a sprightly 79-year-old, shakes his head serenely when I ask whether selling the collection was a hard decision to make.
“Not at all. The second I knew that Yves was ill, condemned, I knew I would sell everything,” he says, referring to the brain cancer that eventually killed his partner. “I think that the day after the sale,” he pauses, “I will feel liberated.”
Behind Bergé – a neat, impatient figure in pin-stripes – hangs an enormous Warhol portrait of his late lover. “I did think about using the collection to create a museum,” asserts Bergé, his voice veering from stern to whimsical, “but it would have been too expensive and I am happy with my decision.”
Throughout their fractious relationship, Bergé was often assigned the role of decision-maker. The son of a tax official and a Montessori teacher from Bordeaux, he is described by writer Alicia Drake as being “fascinated by the idea of the artiste, the creator and the creative spirit”. Small wonder, then, that when he first met 22-year-old Saint Laurent, then working as the head designer at Dior, Bergé instantly fell in love with him.
He was, he recalls, “a strange, shy boy. He wore very tight jackets as if he was trying to keep himself buttoned up against the world – he reminded me of a clergyman, very serious, very nervous.” Six years older, with an established reputation in le grand monde, Bergé had his own potent appeal. “Everything I didn’t have, he had,” Saint Laurent later said. “His strength meant I could rest on him when I was out of breath.”
Conscripted in 1960 to fight in the Algerian war, where he was brutalised, the delicate Saint Laurent was committed to a mental hospital for electric shock treatment and psychoactive drugs, something both Bergé and Saint Laurent blame for his later drug dependency.
Only an appreciation of art provided any respite. “We never disagreed on what we liked,” says Bergé, “and because it is all of such exceptional quality, it all goes well together, despite being very different in style.” The collection seems to epitomise Saint Laurent’s lifelong yearning for joy.Legend has it that the flat on rue de Babylone was so packed full of treasures that there were Monets hanging in the lavatories. True? Bergé shrugs. “Well, yes.”
He and Saint Laurent began collecting in the 1970s, following the launch of Opium (which became the world’s best-selling perfume, making them millions). The collection seems to have provided the glue in a relationship which periodically became unstuck. “In the end it all comes down to the need you have for each other. Yves and I never split up,” he insists, despite reports to the contrary. “We lived separately but we never split up.”
Bergé is unemotional about the couple’s decision to become civil partners shortly before Saint Laurent was incapacitated by brain cancer. “We did it not for romantic reasons but because we had lived 50 years together: it was about achievement, and I had fought for it to be possible, so that homosexuals would be allowed to leave things to their partners.”
Bergé is thankful that, at the end, Saint Laurent was not aware of his own deterioration. “He didn’t understand the nature of his illness. He wouldn’t have had the psychological courage to cope with it.”
He is adamant that both he and Saint Laurent were of the belief that “fashion is not an art form”, although, he concedes, it “may take an artist to create fashion”. Does that not denigrate Saint Laurent’s very genius? “Not at all,” he argues. “Saint Laurent detested fashion.” I wait for the punch line. “Style is what he liked.”
Would the two of them, for example, dissect a woman’s outfit when she walked in the room? “Absolutely not,” he maintains, pained at my vulgarity. “We believed that fashion was to be worn, not to be made into a catwalk show, into theatre. It exists to dress women. Chanel may have given women liberty but Saint Laurent gave them power. By putting women in smoking jackets, he gave them the same confidence and possibility to affirm themselves as men. I see Saint Laurent’s influence today everywhere – everywhere.”
The state of fashion today provokes wonderfully disparaging remarks from Bergé. “These luxury brands are all sadly being bought by nouveaux riches now: Russians or Arabs. There is a real monetary insolence out there at the moment.” And what of the Italian high- fashion brands, I goad him, remembering Bergé’s incendiary assertion that “Italians don’t make clothes, they make spaghetti”. “Versace is nothing and now that he’s dead, it’s less than nothing. And Cavalli’s no good either.”
Models such as Kate Moss, Victoria Beckham and Heidi Klum, who have created their own ranges, are worthy of yet more derision. “I think it’s ridiculous. It’s not because you were a model that you have any talent. Being a designer is a big job, a great job, and one you have to work very, very hard for. Which is why those 'model’ ranges don’t generally work and tend to die out pretty quickly.”
He seems to have tempered his earlier opinion of current Yves Saint Laurent designer, Stefano Pilati, about whom he was at first dubious. “He’s in a difficult situation because if he copies Saint Laurent people will say he’s talentless, and if he does personal things people will say he is not faithful to the brand. But he seems to be doing OK.”
Bergé refers to his lover as Yves when we discuss his personality, and Saint Laurent, (even, on occasion, Monsieur Saint Laurent) when we discuss his achievements. This tells you all you need to know about the nature of their relationship, where the pride and respect are so strong that banal, sentimental love seems belittled in comparison.
“Next year, I plan to throw a huge retrospective in his memory at the Petit Palais,” he says, shifting a little on his chair to show that the interview should be wrapping up now.
In what ways does he miss Saint Laurent, eight months on? “In the little ways,” he says. “Like the other day, I went to the opera and it was so beautiful – and I missed him then because I couldn’t share that with him.”
The Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé Collection is to be sold by Christie’s in association with Pierre Bergé & Associates Auctioneers on February 23-25 at the Grand Palais, Paris (christies.com)



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/fashion/4...ver-happy.html

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10-02-2009
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As found in an American Vogue from 1978, Yves Saint Laurent photographed by Andrea Blanche.
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File Type: jpg american_vogue_november_1978__blanche1sm.jpg (283.5 KB, 32 views)

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14-02-2009
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From the Spring 1968 collection, as photographed by Richard Avedon.


Last edited by iluvjeisa; 14-02-2009 at 05:42 AM.
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14-02-2009
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Bianca Jagger in fuchsia YSL in 1974, photographed by Eric Boman. scanned by me.

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14-02-2009
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thanks a lot ilj for your scans .....

although i'm (very very) schocked by the YSL auction happening next week, I just wanted to give the link to see the items which will be sale .....
it's a pdf ....
http://www.christies.com/images/emai.../YSL_Feb09.pdf

just look and cry because it's not tomorrow that you'll see one of these pieces in a museum ....
but i'm sure Pierre Bergé is gonna get a lot of €€€ with this ........

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14-02-2009
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This is a shot by Serge Lutens, and of course his make-up....from spring 1975.
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14-02-2009
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Those of you who know Italian may be able to assist with this....are these YSL outfits? Photographed by the father of Terry, Bob Richardson, featuring actress Angelica Houston. 1971.
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