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21-08-2007
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1965 PIERRE CARDIN, Paris/New York Mushroom Colored Wool Knit Mod Dress! Museum De-accession! First things first... this dress was missing its original skinny black belt, so I found one that looks nearly perfect. I will keep it with the dress. Otherwise, the dress is NEAR MINT condition! The design is very Cardin - who had an interest in architecture which shows up in his designs. This dress gives the illusion of wrap, but it isn't. Great detailing at the yoke and hemline of horizontal top-stitching gives it the "modern" look. The color is something like a purply-gray... unique! The buttons are ornamental black leather. Back zipper. Measures: 34/35" bust, up to 33" waist, up to 39" hips, 38" long from shoulder to hem. Since it's a knit wool, there is some stretch, though it's fully silk lined. Has the museum tags attached.

source: antiquedress.com
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File Type: jpg pierrecardinmochadressm.jpg (11.4 KB, 2 views)


Last edited by purpleviolets; 21-08-2007 at 06:28 PM.
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21-08-2007
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1960's PIERRE CARDIN "Jeunesse", Paris, Made in France Purple Tweed Suit with Matching Coat! Hand Labeled and Deaccessioned from Museum! Actually Jeunesse is the youth line, but as you can see, this is COUTURE level with the hand-written tags on both the jacket and the coat! They match exactly, but I suppose the two different names allow for customers who wanted to buy the suit as a skirt and coat, or to buy the suit as a skirt and jacket...or as this original customer did... to buy all three pieces to mix and match! Only detail besides the fabulous color wool tweed of purple, blue, teal, rose and black., is the matching bow at front of jacket, and tie neck of coat. Measures: 34-35" bust (no large backs best), 19" long jacket, 24.5" waist skirt, 21" long skirt with 3" hem, 42" long coat, 18" across back coat, 3/4 sleeve lengths. Hidden snap closures on jacket and coat. Back metal zipper back of skirt is even couture... as it's rose colored to match! Excellent, near Mint condition. Labeled old size 8, but smaller in today's sizing. This outfit could easily be worn and then returned to a museum!

source: antiquedress.com
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File Type: jpg pierrecardinthreepiece.jpg (38.5 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg pierrecardinthreepiecect.jpg (30.1 KB, 1 views)
File Type: jpg pierrecardinthreepiecewctoo.jpg (32.3 KB, 1 views)

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28-08-2007
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Quote:
Black wool maxi-dress, late 1960s, early 1970s, labelled `exclusively designed by Pierre Cardin Paris', with shaped and buttoned front panel.


kerrytaylorauctions.com

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03-09-2007
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here is a cool blog that many of you will enjoy
it's a good one to check for a range of interesting space-age related designs

all of his references to Cardin:

http://worldofkane.blogspot.com/search?q=cardin

first of all, check out Cardin's house! designed by Palais Bulles



...

also he has some scans from Pierre Cardin Past, Present, Future by Valerie Mendes (1990)





more at the blog, see what you think.

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03-09-2007
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Pierre Cardin has the most incredible house. Isn't it where Mareva Galanter did her video... "Pourquoi pas moi"? I'd love to visit!

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03-09-2007
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Wowee, what a house and excellent link to lots of M. Cardin's mod mod mod fashion world! Thanks a million, auxt! I found more large images of the house here. Now I want to find out more about the architect, Antti Lovag.

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03-09-2007
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the coolness is overwhelming..

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03-09-2007
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Cardin had no hand in designing the house. Here is the story. But it is amazing because it certainly looks as though it was made just for him!

Quote:
Twenty years ago, Pierre Cardin was looking for a house in Cannes, but he couldn't stand the prospect of the unoriginal villas that had multiplied all over the Côte d'Azur. He wanted the architectural equivalent of his avant-garde creations in fashion. Then, cutting across a point of land with a magnificent view of the Mediterranean, he happened upon a construction site. The project was being built by an architect named Antti Lovag for an industrialist with whom Lovag had become friends while building a previous house. The current one was most intriguing: It was to be a bubble-house, an unusual enterprise intended to demonstrate the possibility of short-circuiting traditional architecture in the name of original, contemporary design. Unfortunately, the industrialist with this brilliant vision died before the work was complete, which is where Cardin stepped in—overjoyed to acquire, almost ready-made, a residence that fit him like a glove.

For what better habitation could one imagine for the genius behind the bubble dress, the trapeze coat, hat-sculptures, giant buttons, asymmetrical collars, and the chic-shock pairing of miniskirts and maxicoats? This promoter of the unusual in the realm of fashion—who got his start creating costumes and masks for Cocteau's La Belle et la Bête, was the first couturier to launch a ready-to-wear line, in 1959, staged the first fashion show in communist China, in 1979, and wasn't afraid to turn businessman, licensing his name to anything and everything and opening Maxim's restaurants worldwide—this agent provocateur had finally found his dream house.

He'd also found a kindred spirit. Lovag was born in Russia to a Russian Jewish father and a Finnish mother. The architect-to-be spent part of his childhood in Finland and Sweden, where he acquired a belief in the primacy of the functional. But because he also lived in Turkey as a child—and perhaps also because of his Russian influences—he associated functionality with aesthetics, and the curves and cupolas of Russian and Islamic architecture would reappear in his work. Later, studying naval architecture, he rediscovered curves in the hulls of boats. He eventually found a job with Jean Prouvé in Paris, then went to work for an architect in Sardinia. "He was a true artist," Lovag says of his Sardinian mentor. "First, he taught me what to avoid, technically. He also had a tremendous amount of taste and inventiveness in both architecture and decoration, which he saw as interconnected."

A heart attack inspired Lovag to reflect on life, and his new outlook of course influenced his architecture. "I discovered that I was mortal—meaning I discovered that I was free. I realized that building as if for eternity is an attack on time itself. Furthermore, it usually leads to an angular, aggressive organization of space. On the other hand, when one knows one's limits, all that is swept away. I began to think about improvised buildings, cobbled together on-site and adapted to a particular person's desires or idea of a house," he explains. "Instead of construction based on prefabricated panels, I began experimenting with frameworks that could be bent and changed and with techniques of concrete surfacing. That way, forms could move again." Architecture's first task, he came to believe, was to eliminate inhuman angularity.

Cardin, too, adores curves. "The circle is my symbol," he says. "The sphere represents the creation of the world and the mother's womb. Holes, cones, breasts—I've always used them in my designs." Hence his immediate understanding with Lovag. Part cave, part space station, simultaneously organic and manic, the house evokes the art of Niki de St. Phalle and Louise Bourgeois. Outside the doors and windows, which Lovag compares to eyes looking from different perspectives, several round swimming pools mirror the circle theme.

Everything Cardin selected to furnish the interior is curves: the walls, the beds, the bathtubs, a suite of phantasmagoric armchairs. And it all seems to float in curving spaces where color plays an important part. "The lighting is designed so colors change according to the time of day," Lovag says. "There's nothing more disheartening than white walls. They make you think you're in the hospital."

Speaking of hospitals, most people dismissed Cardin's Mediterranean retreat as a high-style lunatic asylum when Lovag completed construction in 1990. "Crazy House," they called it. Now it's considered a historic monument.
interiordesign.net

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03-09-2007
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yes, i made a mistake, Palais Bulles is not a person ... it is Lovag who should be credited of course.

thanks for posting the background info, very interesting stuff
it makes you realize how boring typical houses can be

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30-12-2007
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Jewelled evening gown, circa 1965, labelled `Pierre Cardin Paris,' entirely covered in gold and silver sequins in a giant hounds-tooth check repeat and further embellished with large rose-cut and elliptical pastes, the neckline, collar and hem with large jewelled bands.


kerrytaylorauctions.com

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30-12-2007
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Rose pink degradé ball gown, late 1970s or early 80s, labelled `Pierre Cardin, Paris', with strapless boned bodice, broad belt, the skirt exploding into an asymmetric trained overskirt which changes from pale pink at the hem to deep rose at the waist, gathered up over one hip and adorned with a rose corsage, slim deep rose pink inner skirt.




kerrytaylorauctions.com

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01-02-2008
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Night gown, 1970
Jardins sculptés 3


horvatland.com

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05-02-2008
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Breathtaking! You can see how many of today's avant-garde designers take cues from his silouhettes and proportions. So cool. It still looks like something from an imaginary futuristic realm, which, I gather is the entire purpose of fantastical fashion.

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30-08-2008
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Quote:
Originally appearing in the March 15, 1967, Vogue, this Bert Stern minimal and clean image features '60s It girl Twiggy in a swingy, pleated metallic Pierre Cardin dress, Hattie Carnegie earrings, and gold Rene Mancini pumps. Cardin was well known for this type of space-age look that characterized the decade.
condenaststore.com

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09-01-2009
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i love pierre cardin. these pictures are all scanned by me from the pierre cardin: fifty years of fashion & design book.
































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