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06-04-2005
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there is a key word to conceptual aspects of Japanese culture, "Fueki-Ryukou".
this is a way of thinking by Bashou Matsuo (1644-94), a haiku poet who is still influential in Japan. this archaic Japanese is familiar to creative people in particular, and some of them set to work, perfectly conscious of it. once CDG quoted it in their announcement too.
"Fueki" is almost equivalent for everlasting or unchanging thing while "Ryukou" is for everchanging thing, fashion. just like the quote from Yohji in softgrey's post #193, "I sing the same song, even if the melody is different every time."


roughly translated extract from "bashou-numon"

Quote:
then, Bashou explained to Hokushi about "Fueki-Ryukou" in haiku.
this is the idea: beyond the times, schools and means, something immutable and constant lies at the root of all kinds of art. something like the essence of art. that's Fueki.
but Fueki will make its appearance in the fashion, being continuously transformed through the times, schools and means.
the underlying thing, which is absolute and essential, should be above the times. masterpieces should all have something in common. it could be called the Divine or the Absolute.
but it is abstract. therefore, when expressed in the concrete, it will have corporeality characteristic of each time and each creator. if anything, it will get to be realized only after a new idea at the forefront of the time and an original expression of the creator.
namely Fueki, the essence, truly appears in the latest fashion.


the definite consciousness of that way of thinking might make the difference between the Belgians and the Japanese. it seems to me that what some of Japanese designers are trying to do is make clothes carry "Fueki" as hard as they could rather than just design new clothes in every collection.
I think of it when I see something very serious or even unearthly in their clothes.

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06-04-2005
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^that's interesting, runner, thank you!

from www.photography-now.com

about "may i help you?" an exhibition of photographers who have worked
with yamamoto...sorry if this has been posted already!
Quote:

Yohji Yamamoto: May I help you? provides a chance to look back on Yamamoto's work through the works of eight photographers, all of whom have produced "visual" photographs for the Yohji Yamamoto catalogue and other materials related to the designer from 1984 to the present. The monochromatic photographs from Max Vadukul, who was active from the beginning, show out-of-the-ordinary images with Manhattan as a backdrop, while the photos of Paolo Roversi depict androgynous people with canes in both hands. These are two examples of the unique style and individual creativity of each photographer. Free from the influence of Yamamoto's style, the photographs that they create are, so to speak, free "visual" interpretations of the designer and his work.

"Fashion is only complete when it is worn by ordinary people who exist now, managing their lives, loving and grieving." (quoted from Yohji Yamamoto, Talking to myself)

Yamamoto possesses both a spirit of rebellion and great magnanimity. In the same way that his clothes are completed through the personal arrangement of each individual, this exhibition will be finally completed when it is viewed by each individual through the interpretations of Yohji Yamamoto provided by photographers.
Attached Images
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File Type: jpg yama.jpg (33.6 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg yamam.jpg (31.9 KB, 14 views)

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06-04-2005
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runner..thank you for that...

so fueki is some intangible essence that all art has...
some indefinable thing that lies beneath the surface?...the thing that makes it 'art'
am i understanding this...?

thanks for the translation nqth-for some reason it came up japanese for me...
i agree-poetic is a good way to describe yohji's work...maybe that's fueki?...

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06-04-2005
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soft you may be interested in this
http://www.moa-inter.or.jp/english/s...su-kurita.html

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thanks travolta...i got about halfway through...i have to come back to it...
can't absorb it all at once...

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06-04-2005
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You are welcome, Softgrey:-)

Thank you Travolta, I will have to study it :-)


Thanks Runner for the explaination. It's very interesting, hard to understand:-). So what is fueki in Comme's works? Is it the idea of "strong" that Rei Kawakubo often says. She said that "strong" means the freedom to create.

So clothes that don't have any constrains. The collections are expression of different states of being free.

Comme is usually "raw", rebelous, punk-ish in their expression, even when she makes the sweetest bridal dresses. Yohji is quiet, poetic. Sometimes I think that because Yohji sees "beautiful women" in his clothes but Rei sees rather strong, fighting, powerful women. I don't know if I am right:-)

Do you notice that "changing" is an issue for many designers? Jil Sander was trying hard to change her fashion, and managing to keep her very own style in the same time. It's hard because the pure concept is about concrete things in design, form, shape, cut...

Changing is the v. natural for Comme, for examples, imo, since her concept is not limited by any mean. She may uses her "language" anytimes, but the results are often completely new. I'd say it is v. "Fueki-Ryukou". Am I right?:-)


Last edited by nqth; 06-04-2005 at 05:50 PM.
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08-04-2005
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the rest of the article is available here http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl..._53868147/pg_1
Miyake and Japanese Tradition

What is Japanese in Miyake's work, and why has its "Eastern" component been so well received in the West? The designer understands and appreciates the strengths of Japan's traditions, and is equally aware of how and when to translate that knowledge beyond Japan' borders. The pervasiveness of indigo, for instance, in traditional Japanese folk dress and textiles served as an influence in Miyake's earliest clothing collections. The blue of our ubiquitous blue jeans was originally derived from the same dye source.

In its outlines, the T-shaped kimono can be called an elongated forerunner of our T-shirt. It is simple in construction, being formed of rectangular sections of cloth sewn side to side, which make up the sleeves and body of the garment. In his early handkerchief dresses (1970) Miyake did the same, but instead shifted the orientation of the seams from the vertical to the diagonal.

The relationship between the wearer's body and the traditional kimono is another reference that can be seen in much of Miyake's clothing. Unlike occidental dress, which tends to follow the body's contours through the use of bias cutting, padding and an overall tight fit, the kimono disguises the body's specific shape, and instead suggests the body's movements in the way the voluminous sleeves sway and the long trailing hem sweeps as the wearer moves. Miyake's clothes, which have also been worn by dancers in performances, do not usually hug the body, but move with it in interesting ways.

Because the cut of the kimono is so simple, Japanese textile artisans and designers focused their attention on the fabric itself and its surface decoration. The weight and texture of the cloth used for kimono conveys a wide range of tactile and visual sensations. The designs created by dyeing, weaving, embroidery and applied metal foils can be startling in their dynamic and asymmetric patterning.

An understanding of textile fibers, both natural and synthetic, and of fabrics, both handwoven and traditionally dyed, as well as high-tech textiles that are not woven at all, is one of the most remarkable aspects of Miyake's work. Multi-directional pleating, garments encased in metallic skins, multicolored feltlike clothing "collaged" together from irregularly shaped pieces of cloth, and dresses with large sections that are selectively shrunk represent some of the textile-conscious directions that Miyake has taken in recent years.

A Miyake design doesn't correspond to a particular fashion season, current look or social tendency. His clothes are difficult to put in any chronological order by those who are unfamiliar with his work. One of the more refreshing aspects of Issey Miyake as a fashion designer (a designation he dislikes) is that he does not participate in the seasonal trends involving the selective exposure, exaggeration, or emphasis of a particular part of the female anatomy. This is not to imply that bare skin and transparency are absent from his design vocabulary, but rather that such factors do not drive his design statements. Many of his clothes (as is the case with the kimono) can be worn by women of all ages, shapes and sizes.

The distinction between art and design was not relevant in traditional Japan. Painters worked on kimono, textile designers might also be potters. A hierarchy of fine and applied arts did not exist. An event such as the tea ceremony included a single painting or calligraphic work, ceramics as tea bowls, textiles as wrappers for tea utensils, a flower arrangement and specially-made edibles, all set in a carefully designed space. Perhaps it is this approach that facilitates Miyake's collaborations with artists and his periodic appearances in art museums.

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your welcome you guys. i've been trying to educate myself. once you have read through that you can read another essay i've found, which i think is slightly better, but both are interesting.

http://ccbs.ntu.edu.tw/FULLTEXT/JR-ADM/railey.htm

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11-04-2005
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you are welcome anna, softgrey, nqth

yes softgrey, although the extract says "art" in that context, it could extend to what we make on the whole.
something which has eternal life.

nqth, I think you are.
changing is a means of being free. the new is a necessary of her expression.
the latest individual idea is a chance of the descending of Fueki.

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11-04-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nqth
Comme is usually "raw", rebelous, punk-ish in their expression, even when she makes the sweetest bridal dresses. Yohji is quiet, poetic. Sometimes I think that because Yohji sees "beautiful women" in his clothes but Rei sees rather strong, fighting, powerful women. I don't know if I am right:-)

this is interesting nqth...and i might have agreed with you before...
but in the A magazine...yohji speaks about being very 'angry'...especially when he first began designing...and of fighting against the 'fashion system' and trying to change it...to expand the definition of 'fashion'...

this was a big surprise to me...because i think of his work as more 'quiet and poetic'...it doesn't seem 'angry' or confrontational in the way that rei's often does...

i think maybe his work has come full circle...the stuff he does now is more like what i remember him designing in his early career...but now it's more well-developed...and more refined...

i will try to find the quote and post it...

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Last edited by softgrey; 11-04-2005 at 05:15 PM.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runner
yes softgrey, although the extract says "art" in that context, it could extend to what we make on the whole.
something which has eternal life.
how lovely...

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11-04-2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nqth
Comme is usually "raw", rebelous, punk-ish in their expression, even when she makes the sweetest bridal dresses. Yohji is quiet, poetic. Sometimes I think that because Yohji sees "beautiful women" in his clothes but Rei sees rather strong, fighting, powerful women. I don't know if I am right:-)
I missed this the first time, but softgrey's response brought it to my attention and reminded me of one of my favorite YY quotes: "I believe clothes cannot make women beautiful. Only women can make clothes beautiful." Kawakubo, on the other hand, has at one point stated flat out, "Iím not interested in making women look beautiful."

At first I thought this indicated a stark contrast in attitude between the two of them, but after thinking about it, they now strike me as quite similar; they are both saying that they're not in the business of making "beautiful" clothes. It's the person wearing it who determines the end result.


Last edited by droogist; 11-04-2005 at 06:07 PM.
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11-04-2005
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Softgrey, I also remember reading Yohji somewhere that he said he is angry about fashion system, even at the market...

But I cannot see it in his clothes indeed. He didn't right a protest song:-) He just sings his own way. Maybe he doesn't see "angry clothes" as a right way to express his feelings.

I can't remember when his collections actually questioning things. To me his clothes are always elegant, "womenly" in a way. Not in a traditional mean of course, there are the asymetrical things, drapping, playing with cuts and volumn. But the cut is always soft and gentle. There might be a pair of boots, or hair style that shows the "rebel" attitute, but in a whole, there is always the traditional harmony. A woman seems to be always the absolute in his mind.

I think "refine" is the word, Softgrey:-)

I think the diff. of their works might come from the way they both see fashion. Yohji Yamamoto in fact said about women making the clothes beautiful. Rei Kawakubo said about feeling "positive energy". It's like it's not about "being", but "creating":-)


Last edited by nqth; 11-04-2005 at 07:38 PM.
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11-04-2005
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OMG, Yamamoto did prints before:-)

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Last edited by nqth; 11-04-2005 at 07:49 PM.
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12-04-2005
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i just saw a pic of a pleats please cropped jacket in Nylon...does anyone know where i can find pics online?

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