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09-07-2007
  16
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i love the icelandic girls and the switzerland one and the Navajo indian accessories With the black and white i guess it's hard to tell if some parts in the necklace and bracelet are fabric or wood/jewel :p giving me some ideas

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09-07-2007
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Europe continued...
...

Sevilla, Spain.


Toledo, Spain.


Alicante, Spain.


Valencia, Spain.


Sevilla, Spain.




Basque region.




Toledo.


Salmantina.

[all shot by me]

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09-07-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gius View Post
i love the icelandic girls and the switzerland one and the Navajo indian accessories With the black and white i guess it's hard to tell if some parts in the necklace and bracelet are fabric or wood/jewel :p giving me some ideas
oh I know!
it would all come to life if there was some color and the white was real white and not grey.. tut tut..

*I'll do africa and asia on wednesday!.

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Metal teeth of carousels.

Last edited by MulletProof; 09-07-2007 at 06:06 PM.
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09-07-2007
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Tsujigahana The Flower of Japanese Textile Art by Toshiko Itô

(Japan...)




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09-07-2007
  20
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09-07-2007
  21
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^All the prints here are made by hand.. They're painting directly on to the fabric and they also use shibori technique, which is basically tie-dye

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Originally Posted by Mulletproof
I love the all-white molas, I think they're all from the Oaxaca region.. or perhaps Veracruz, I'm not sure.. but they're beautiful..
If you ever see these all-white ones again, please take a picture of it for me Sounds interesting! I always these super coloured ones


Last edited by gius; 09-07-2007 at 06:37 PM.
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09-07-2007
  22
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Marvelous thread, Gius. I've had to think about it for some time - what to contribute that really interests me among all the amazing traditional methods of creating fabric and structure, the decoration of the human body. So here's my first thought about incredible ethnic fashion that has never gone out of fashion for hundreds and hundreds of years. Because of its origin on the Silk Road, ikat has spread to many, many regions over a long period of time.

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Ikats are the most visually dramatic woven textiles produced in Central Asia and have a history dating back to at least the seventeenth century. In Central Asia ikat is known as abr, which in Persian means 'cloud-like', because the motifs appear to float, their edges softly blending into the adjacent colours.
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Ikat is a complex artistic technique used to create images on textiles. The term Ikat derives from the Malay work mengikat, meaning "to tie". The technique was perhaps developed in Western Asia during the first millennium A.D. Its distinctive feature is that the images are dyed onto the threads before they are placed on the loom and woven into the finished fabric, The threads are first secured to the dying frame and then sections of the design that are to remain undyed are wrapped with a dye-resistant fiber according to the requirements of the pattern. Once the portion of the design to be protected from the first color are tied off, the threads are removed from the frame and immersed in the dye. With the exception of white (the natural color of the thread), a separate dye bath is required for each color that appears in the finished textile, Before each bye bath, the threads are reattached to the frame and strips are cut away or added as necessary to ensure that the individual elements have the appropriate color in the final design. Even the most complex Ikat patterns are created solely through the tying and dyeing process.


Entire article at the source: http://www.galenfrysinger.com/new_york_museum_ikat.htm. The first quote is from powerhousemuseum.com where you can search for anything under the sun!

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 09-07-2007 at 07:29 PM.
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09-07-2007
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A contemporary Uzbek coat in ikat.



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kat coats are an integral component of textile art in Central Asia, practiced by both the Uzbek and Tadjik peoples. This particular coat is an Uzbek example, a particularly colorful example of the art form. The designs are classic. The weave features silk warps with cotton wefting, a characteristic of 19th century ikat weaving. This art form is explored in detail in various publications including "Ikat" by Andrew Hale & Kate FitzGibbon. There the entire process is explained as well as the cultural context in which these coats were made and used. Often, they were intended for women, though men too wore these sumptuous chapans, as they are called in local languages. Undoubtedly, this one was intended for use by a woman due to the style of cut of the coat, with a pinched waist. The people who prepared the dyes for silk weaving were often Jews, indigenous residents of Uzbekistan, who also wore such garments themselves. The coat is lined with a Russian cotton, a common cloth used for this purpose.
More information at the source: http://www.tribalsource.net/item11ikatcoat.html

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09-07-2007
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Some of the patterns from Japan over the centuries are breathtaking.
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Detail of Ikat pattern. Material: China grass. Ikat is called "kasuri" in Japanese. Edo Period, 19th Century. From Yaeyama, Okinawa


mingeikan.or.jp

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09-07-2007
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Last one for now... Child of the Double Ikat, from Bali Sacred & Secret by Gill Marais



news.ubud.com

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09-07-2007
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This is an interesting site with lots of examples of textiles from various traditions around the world. http://www.ethno-textile.com/index.php - examples of Mola and Ikat included! I just love all that lace, by the way, MP.

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 09-07-2007 at 09:57 PM.
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10-07-2007
  27
a hymn to darkness
 
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This thread is absolutely beautiful.

This section is fast becoming my favorite part of the forums.

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10-07-2007
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ahh gius, the textiles in post 20 are absolutely beautiful.. so rich in color..
I love the Uzbek coat, somethingelse.. there's a man in a nearby town that has a store with all those middle-eastern goodies.. so many shawls, dresses and blouses.. the fabrics as usual are always eye-candy... and wallet-enemy. :p

not wednesday but I'm back with a few pics from Asia & the middle east.

SIAMESE GIRLS (THAILAND)


KYRGYZSTAN


ARMENIA.


KURDISTAN.








BALOCHISTAN.


TIBET.


TRIPURA (INDIA)

[all shot by me]

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Metal teeth of carousels.
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10-07-2007
  29
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Asia continued...
...
KASHMIR REGION.


AFHGAN MEN.


INDIA.




JAPAN


AINU TRIBE (JAPAN)


LAOS.


BURMA.


THAI WOMAN.


BURMA.


MALAYSAN MAN.

[shot by me]

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13-07-2007
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This one huge image of people in Peru is incredible. Click here.

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