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14-07-2007
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Spain 1922

Festal Costume La Alberca


Jarez Mantilla


Mule Ride

scanned by MMA

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14-07-2007
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Sari styles
love the ikat, SomethingElse :p I always wondered why/how the graphics on the fabric look like that--it's kind of like 'motion blur'

The Sari
Quote:
A sari / saree is the traditional female garment of the Indian subcontinent.[1] The sari is a very long strip of unstitched cloth, ranging from four to nine metres in length, which can be draped in various styles. The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist, with one end then draped over the shoulder baring the midriff.[1] The sari is usually worn over a petticoat (called lehnga/ghagra in northern India, pavada/pavadai in the south, and shaya in eastern India), with a blouse known as a choli/ ravika forming the upper garment. The choli has short sleeves with a low neck and is usually cropped, which is particularly well-suited for wear in the sultry South Asian summers. Office dress codes, however, prohibit cropped, sleeveless cholis; similarly, women in the armed forces, when wearing a sari uniform, don a half-sleeve shirt tucked in at the waist.
wikipedia

Mul style


http://www.devi.net/Mul.html
http://www.cbmphoto.co.uk/saris/phsariBEST.html

Bengali style


Kerala Mundu - 2 piece style


Kaccha pants style


Nivi style

sarisafari

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14-07-2007
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^Click the links under the pictures for more info






http://www.cbmphoto.co.uk/saris/phsariBEST.html

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14-07-2007
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bookcase.com






http://www.cbmphoto.co.uk/saris/phsariBEST.html

Quote:
Dries van Noten f/w 07







style.com



Last edited by gius; 14-07-2007 at 02:06 PM.
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14-07-2007
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Gorgeous scans, MMA, I love Spanish traditional costumes ..

..nice pics, Gius, I think that's one of the reasons why I admire Dries so much, he's constantly inspired by ethnic fashion from all over the globe and seems to have a clear understanding and appreciation of the beauty and background behind them .. he makes such dignified adaptations and doesn't take it as a theme or something ironic or ridiculously exotic as other designers. lovelove.

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14-07-2007
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I completely agree, Mulletproof :p It's just about creating something beautiful for him.. Laika and I are trying to figure out what he means for this collection--he says it's inspired by simply knotted Indian dresses that look expensive (according to the translator)..but these Indian saris have no knots; it is only draping, pleating and tucking. The draping effect is right on the point on Dries' though

Thanks MMA for the Spanish costumes !
I am trying to save them to my computer, but it doesn't work for some reason
I just get a blank image or a 'black dot' when I open the file
I'm just doing 'copy + paste' for now


Last edited by gius; 14-07-2007 at 02:44 PM.
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14-07-2007
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perhaps it's a mixture, gius?. Those Dries dresses resemble (for me) more the traditional costumes of the old Indochine region rather than Indian saris. I'm no expert, though.

ARLÉSIENNES (PROVENCE, FRANCE).





[camargue-photos.de]

Also inspiration for Christian Lacroix HC S/S 06...


[style]

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Last edited by La bordélique; 08-06-2010 at 09:08 AM. Reason: Dead Link
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16-07-2007
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I love seeing all these people in their traditional handmade clothes and jewelry. While I try to find my favorite silk, here is some interesting information about the sari from India.

Quote:
The Indian Saree (a.k.a. Sari, Seere, Sadi) boasts of oldest existence in the sartorial world. It is more than 5000 years old! It is mentioned in Vedas, the oldest existing (surviving) literature (3000 B.C.) Patterns of dress change throughout the world now and then but, the Sari has survived because it is the main wear of rural India. 75% of the population (now a billion as per official estimate) wear versatile sari. We can certainly call this cloth versatile because it could be worn as shorts, trousers, flowing gown-like or convenient skirt-wise--all without a single stitch!

Saree (original--Chira in Sanskrit, cloth) is of varied length. From 5 yards to 9.5 yards tied loosely, folded and pleated, it could be turned into working dress or party-wear with manual skill. For day to day dress of middle class women, 5-6 yard sari is comfortable to manage household chores. Working class tucks the same length above the ankles and if they have to work in water or fields, they would tuck the front pleats between the legs to the back, and tie the upper portion round the waist. This left them free movement of hands and legs.

...An old or worn-out saree is equally utilitarian. Grandmothers used to stitch quilts folding soft and worn-out Sarees and putting bright new cloth on cover, for children which kept them warm. Worn-out thicker Sarees were used as bed covers or blankets in the cradle (as the babies wetted it frequently). For village women, folds of Sarees serve as pouches, bags and haversack to carry grocery and at times babies as well. Some used to make a stand-by cradle out of sree length for the baby. Tying the ends to a nearby tree. White Sarees could be turned into towels, napkins, diapers etc., even after they are worn out.
Quote:
"The Sari, it is said, was born on the loom of a fanciful weaver. He dreamt of Woman. The shimmer of her tears. The drape of her tumbling hair. The colors of her many moods. The softness of her touch. All these he wove together. He couldn't stop. He wove for many yards. And when he was done, the story goes, he sat back and smiled and smiled and smiled."
kamat.com . museumshop.com

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 16-07-2007 at 03:46 PM.
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16-07-2007
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I'm in Asia, looking for a specific silk which is eluding me. It will happen! In the meanwhile... a woman c. 1880 - 1910 Ceylon.



India, Rajasthan: The Maharaja of Jodhpur, c. 1920



A Tamil woman, Ceylon, c. 1880s-1910



Charles Nouette, a Mandarin and his family, c. 1906.



trocadero.com

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 16-07-2007 at 05:32 PM.
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01-08-2007
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^very nice designs, this last one especially.. love the wide sleeves and also the length of some of the coats. plus lovely collars and how it closes just close to the side seam on a regular shirt (the girl in the centre). the whole thing reminds me of silhouettes i see more and more lately in the last couple of years

Northern Caucas



these top two are fans ...


http://mith.ru/caucas/orn/index.htm

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01-08-2007
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same source

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01-08-2007
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Smolensk (Russia)


Tambov (Russia)

ljplus.ru

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01-08-2007
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A little trip to Museum of Anthropology at University of British Columbia...

some random photographs i took


found these in a giant dresser... China, Korea...


and oh look, a Western man

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01-08-2007
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great thread av always been fascinated by ethnic fashion, has anyone posted any inca fashion? I loved their use of bright colours anbd also blue

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09-08-2007
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^I can't remember any, but feel free to post some...

Christian Lacroix prep collage for A/W 2000
Don't know the country behind the inspiration, but reutberger sounds German?

scanned from fashioning fabrics by Elyssa da Cruz

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