Dior: The Borehouse - Page 2 - the Fashion Spot
 
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12-07-2009
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What he needs to do is find inspiration that is good and, if needs be, safe.
But just do something with a bit of inspiration.
Not just a load of ugly archive pieces matched with underwear.
Soon enough all of the big name houses are just going to be different coloured variations of the archive. Just like the Valentino direction.

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OK, some suggestions:


- lose the tranny make-up. It looks old and dated. And combining that with old looking clothes doesn't make the Dior model 'hip.'
- chose better fabrics: most Dior fabrics look and feel cheap. Yes hard to believe, but true. Especially when you visit the stores.
- go dark, dangerous and sexy. Take some cues from Elbaz. That is the Parisian woman we all love.
- change the ad campaigns to something so different, so unique that it will give an instant face-lift to the brand image.
- go modern: pls pls pls pls!!!! We need to see one futuristic thing from Dior: just one thing.
- re-evaluate 'the fashion jewelry' line: Dior sadly offers the cheapest designer jewelry there is to be found. Airport crap... YUCK! even the prices are so low, it just breaks one's heart.
- re-release the saddle bag.
- create a younger line if there is need.
- fire every accessory designer in the house, and hire much younger people, and release three very loud and bold brand new bag designs and invest in shoes... lots of shoes.
- collaborations with artists, architectures, industrial designers... anyone that can bring something fresh to the table. Also editors and stylists. (God, I can't believe I am suggesting this)
- make the fragrance campaigns and packaging much more opulent and high-taste: most Dior cosmetic campaigns looks painfully cheap. Look at Chanel, even Gucci, then look at Dior: so sad in every way in comparison.


Last edited by b9409; 12-07-2009 at 06:05 PM.
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Some of those suggestions remind me of an article from The Times in 2005:

Quote:
Who adores Dior?

To-die-for couture at the shows; flashy logo-ed jeans and plastic porno mules in the shops. So who is the Dior woman? Kate Spicer tries to find out

“The girls from Liverpool and the Indian girls go for them,” says the Dior assistant. “Well, I’m from Liverpool, and I think it’s like a Barbie shoe,” says Eagles’s mate. “I’ve never seen a girl in Liverpool wearing a pair of those. I could really see Jodie Marsh in that — at Stringfellows.”

Eagles looks over the selection in the concession, which is largely bags, shoes and entry-level clothing — scarves, tops and those J’adore Dior T-shirts. “They remind me of ‘I love Benidorm’. I really do not know who buys them,” she says, fingering a £255 sequined one. “Some of it’s young, fun and bold, like disposable high fashion at top prices. But even if the prices were high-street, I still wouldn’t buy it. I suppose it’s a real emblem of how much disposable cash is around.” Her mate says: “It makes me think of that Shania Twain line, ‘All we ever want is more/A lot more than we had before’.”

Justine Mills, the owner and buyer of Cricket, Liverpool’s fashion HQ for footballers’ wives, explains why, in a city of peacocks who love nothing more than dressing very up, and will spend their last pennies doing so, you can’t find Dior. “We have Roland Mouret, Balenciaga, Stella, Chloé, Missoni, Matthew Williamson and Temperley. But we don’t stock Dior, because, although I think it has a fantastic designer, the best, I imagine the people who buy it are Russian prostitutes.”

The words “Russian prostitute” come up again in the weeks spent trying to figure out who is Dior woman now. The label, once known for its raffiné tailoring, romantic evening dresses and strong sense of colour, is now frequently spoken of in those somewhat racist bywords for a tasteless logo whore. Even the two most devoted Dior junkies I unearthed used those cruel words when we went for a good rummage around the Sloane Street shop. Even they found some of the kit revolting.

Fashion takes a hard line on Dior’s designer, John Galliano. He is, officially, a genius, and is always spoken of in reverential terms. If you own a piece of Galliano’s Central St Martins graduation show — famously sold lock, stock to Joan Burstein of Browns as it came off the catwalk — then you own a fashion Picasso. The maverick prince joined the house of Dior in 1997, and has been credited with raising one of Paris’s most distinguished ateliers from the dust. His couture shows are a fashion spectacular, the work of a genius designer at the top of his game, but he also bears responsibility for the entire design empire — the ready-to-wear, accessories, perfume, children’s clothes, watches, jewellery and beauty. From a £30,000 couture dress to a £10 lip gloss, it is all under Galliano’s creative thumb.

He has said that when he designs couture, he has someone real in his head, someone who epitomises modern style — Kate Moss or Gwen Stefani, perhaps. I wonder whom he had in mind when he was designing the plastic high-heeled mules in white and pink? There is a chasm between the glamour, creativity and spectacle of catwalk Dior, and the utter trashiness of much of the Dior that makes it into the shops. The French are whispering about the tarnishing of the once chic brand. Two Parisian stylists told me how they had stood outside the shop on Avenue Montaigne, laughing.

A high-end freelance fashion stylist, who would not be named (insult Dior and you will probably never be allowed access to its clothes again), concurs: “I definitely think that the stuff in the shop is absolute trash. The shows are an amazing spectacle, but bull**** compared with what ends up in the shops, where there is pink and chiffon and diamanté all over the place. “It’s a case of emperor’s new clothes, because nobody in London does that look. I imagine Britain is not a big market for them. Who wears that ****?”

Another international fashion commentator, who also refused to be named, sees Dior as “that strange mix of high-fashion concept and something trashy and naff. It is for people with flashy money. And for those who can’t afford the suit, there are hair bobbles and handbags. Under Galliano, Dior has become more accessible, but his accessible lines don’t sit comfortably with the prêt-à-porter. It is like he is having a laugh at the customer’s expense”.

Galliano doesn’t see it like that, of course. “The trick, I guess, is to get a happy balance of creativity and originality with commercial appeal,” he says, “to create a mood or personality that everyone can tap into and buy into.” Or, as Sidney Toledano, the president of Dior, puts it: “The creative side defines the concept of the collection — the vision. The business side is responsible for bringing the designer’s vision to life ... with the consumer.”

But what sort of consumer? I am in the store on Sloane Street, the only Dior shop in Britain. Upstairs, the shoes, handbags and sunglasses draw a crowd of bridge-and-tunnel shoppers in crisply ironed peasant wear, straight outta Epsom. The majority of the shoppers are American, wearing hijab or doing the bubble-gum high-fashion thing that the Japanese do so well. Downstairs, where the clothes are, there is just an overweight mother of the bride and her pal. Of course, there is stuff I would grab in a trolley dash — the odd vest, a pair of black silk MC Hammer pants, a petrol-green, classic Galliano bias-cut dress, spoilt only by a blatant logo’ed buckle on its hip.

But I am here for the horrors, and my basket overfloweth: fringed suede hot pants, brown jeans in logo-ed fabric, a fuchsia frilly top, appliquéd and sequined denim, even midriff-baring tops (even New Look has dumped the crop top — midriff-baring is desperately fashion old hat). The nipped-in jackets in the palest denim with white lace look great in the ads, but would take some wearing to look anything other than Moscow moneyed in the real world. The pièces de résistance, though, are white-and-pink logoed silk-jersey sports separates. Teamed in a certain way, they look remarkably like shell suits.

It seems as though all these bizarre clothes aren’t meant for the rarefied London fashion market, but for tourists. I tried to track down an indigenous Dior crowd, I really did. I rang round the after-dark divas, the door bitches, the label whores, the fashion junkies and the women who spend bucketloads on clothes, and I came up with hardly anyone who, in recent years, had bought more than a couple of pairs of sunglasses. Apparently, Dior from the 1950s and 1960s goes well at Bang Bang, the vintage boutique on London’s Goodge Street. But the current collections are a different matter.

A couple of people who have been friends with Galliano since the days when he was regularly seen out with the true hip London mafia said things discreetly through other people, off the record, under pain of death: “She loves Galliano, but she is not a huge fan of mainline Dior”; “She much prefers John’s own stuff”; “She is a very old friend of John’s, and obviously thinks he is a creative genius, but a lot of Dior is not her thing — although she does have some beautiful Dior dresses.”

But the discerning fashion crowd are deserting Dior. Even the baby socialites don’t go for the logo-ed lollipop chic. Isabella Hervey has a baby-pink Dior jumper that bares her midriff, apparently, but those girls are more into Chloé and Matthew Williamson these days.

At the opening of Baby Dior in June, a garden square in Belgravia was transformed into a brat party paradise, with scented Dior candles, white tents, fairies and carousels. The haute couture mamans et bébés were flown over from Paris — models, socialites and actresses — and put up at the Berkeley for free. The British list ranged from the stylist queen bee Katy England to Tamara Mellon, Mrs Roman Abramovich and Elizabeth Hurley. These are the customers Dior wants to think about.

Hurley gave me a quote, which I am under strict instructions to use in full: “I’ve worn countless Dior dresses, and they’ve all been fabulous. I love wearing anything that John designs. More importantly, not only is he brilliantly creative and talented, he’s also an incredibly nice man.”

Hurley has been seen in a lot of Dior. She will do entry-level kit such as the J’adore Dior T-shirt — as seen on every fake-label market stall from Wembley to Istanbul — and she will do couture gowns.

Baby Dior is going to be all about entry-level kit. Not every mummy can afford the main collection’s chiffon minidress, but seeing baby in £50 Dior diamanté bootees or sucking on a plastic bottle with Dior wrapped around it is going to delight a certain type of godmother. Because when it is for kids, the tackiness of blatant Dior branding is bypassed for the pure campness of it all. Baby Dior is for sale in Liverpool.

When I meet Kate and Liz, the girlfriends of wealthy nightclub and property entrepreneurs, Kate, 25, is wearing a pair of those pink-and-white mules, along with high-end jeans and a tight, bright-pink kaftan stretched across her standout, pillowy cleavage. Liz, 33, is wearing exactly the same.

“Diamonds and pink are the words that describe me and Kate,” says Liz. We talk over several vodka tonics. These women don’t work — other than at the gym, where they wear old J’adore Dior T-shirts, even the sequined ones. Their style icons are Paris Hilton, Nicole Ritchie, “Cat Deeley’s got beautiful hair” and Victoria Beckham.

“We’re not into Jordan. I like the way she looks, but she’s too trashy and high-street. Kate Moss? She makes no effort. I can’t pull that grungy look together — there is an art to it,” says Liz. “Some of the looks that Sienna Miller comes out in, they’re just not acceptable,” agrees Kate.

“We feel a bit weird about wearing colours in this country. British fashion icons are grungy, they wear neutrals and are safe — if you wear colours, you’re made to feel different. We go away a lot, to Europe and America, as much to get dressed up and go out with like-minded people as anything else, because nobody gets dressed up here.”

These girls like to shop — a lot. “The first place I go in Selfridges is the Dior concession. I can guarantee I will like the Dior stuff. Bags, shoes, trainers, casual stuff, belts, sunglasses, lip glosses. I love it all.”

As if to illustrate, they both pull out a gooey, glittery pink Dior Addict lip gloss and top up their juicy kissers. Kate and Liz are dripping in ice: a Chopard watch, a Rolex with diamond bezel, earrings, necklaces. Money is no object. Both had £550 hair extensions cut out in a matter of days — “They gave us a headache.”

Is it any surprise that Dior has an advertising hoarding inside the Nikki Beach bar in St Tropez? Monett, a rich German woman who lives in Monte Carlo, loves Dior. “His clothes aren’t serious. They are perfect for a yacht party. It’s not metropolitan. I would never wear Dior in Germany. In Hamburg or London, you can’t run around in crazy yellow trousers, but here you can. Certainly, some of his looks are too Russian, if you know what I mean, and you can’t wear Dior head to toe, like you can with Cavalli.”

Kate and Liz prefer to do their Dior shopping in Marbella and Monaco. “Dior has just opened a shop in Marbella, where the stuff is more extrovert and OTT. I love the shop in Cannes — there is a lovely one on the Croisette. The bags are nicer — proper crackers, like the ones in the Dubai shop. It’s a more expensive range, a better range, because the customers are richer.”

This summer, they will be shaking their long, immaculately straight blonde hair in Ibiza, Miami, Marbella and New York. “I bought these for Ibiza,” she says, turning her heel for a look at her Dior mules. “They’re great, ’cos the heels don’t scuff.” Doesn’t she think they’re a bit ... “What, strippery? Yeah, I do,” she says, laughing.

And there’s the rub. The cheaper entry-level lines, the ones so diffuse from the original couture collection, are for the fashion ingénue. And they will sell — big time. Last year, the Dior Group turned profits of £1.7 billion. But with Galliano putting on £1m couture shows, it needs to. The vulgar-logoed Dior that you find in the shops finances Galliano’s creative pleasures. As one fashion historian said: “If this is the price we pay for him pushing forward the parameters of fashion, then it’s a price worth paying.”

And the price we pay is the pink-and-white plastic porno mules, at £200 a pair.

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-tranny makeup was always part of Galliano's vision.
-cheap fabrics: i read that it was a choice made by Arnault, to reduce costs and maximize profits. also, to remove silk lining or lining in general was his choice. a lot about the current Dior is Arnault's fault basically. he gets the final say about what lands on the salesfloor but also what makes it onto the runways. Galliano bends to his every whim. and apparently the current Dior sells well enough for Arnault not to care.
-Dior's last MUST HAVE bag was the Gaucho, a bag i loved, but nothing since then was really "THERE".

i'd say "BLAME ARNAULT" but seeing how he is the richest man in all of France, one of the richest worldwide, there's nothing we can really do. Dior apparently still makes money, enough black numbers for Arnault to be happy with the current situation.

sad news, i know, but true news.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerrouge View Post
Some of those suggestions remind me of an article from The Times in 2005:
i guess Arnault read that and was appalled...

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Such a difficult topic
I think they lost interest from the customers because other labels also got great and hip designers,
fashion is all about who is on top now...which brand is cool and so and so

one thing that might help is to re vamp the brand, chopping off all those tacky logo handbags, and the un-necessary lines

like Versace did, they shut down Versus, and they didnt show couture on a runway, they focused on main line

poor john

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^I love the article posted, I guess that is just what it comes down to, sadly...

No, I don't want to have the old Dior woman back. I think she was trashy. The saddle bags made no sense to me. The shirts? Beyond tacky. Yeah, she had sex, but in public places, where everyone could see it and sometimes it was not nice to look at.
But I don't want that cougar striving down the catwalk in a hot pink bar suit, skirt missing either.
What do I suggest?

- less heavy-handedness. Not always a bucket full of colour, no massive collars, bulky a-cuts. Too much of everything, and stiff on top of it. And no tranny make-up, at leats not that version we had for at least three seasons now...
- less obvious inspirations. As a kid I loved it. But as a grown-up woman I don't want a dress that says 'Hello, I am a dress indeed inspired by the Oriental hues of early Dior. Just look at my gold print! Oh, and see these heels? They're all African, so there are fertility godesses! Awesome, huh?' Or mix them. Throw in so much of them 'till they are unrecognizable
- make it modern. Nobody always wants to look like they're stumbled out of a period movie, for god's sake. The designers we love create a look for our century, they don't rehash decade after decade. And don't always update your best looks. Make new ones.
- make it sexy. You don't have to paint nipples or have the models wear latex from the sex-shop. To look like a prostitutes who found a pile on the money on the streets and took it to Dior is not an appealing look, either. But a bit, at last. Make it see through lace, if you have to. But create a girl that wants to sleep with someone from time to time. No matter what age your customer is, they still want a little fun...

I think Galliano's own line still has all of this. Yes, the colouring is unbearable sometimes. But it's so much better and so much more creative than his work at Dior. I can't help but think that there's alot of pressure put on him at Dior.

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The one main thing that Galliano needs to do is to knock his Dior woman off of her pedestal, in a nut shell. He needs to do what he did with the Hobo collection in 2000, the Matrix collection before that; forget the bourgeois hauteur of the salon, the new look and the history of the house and instead do what feels right for today. If the Dior execs are determined to keep the product on the runway, fine, keep it on the runway instead of sending out collections that won't wind up in production. But putting pressure on Galliano to simply xerox a 60 year old moment in time is ludicrous.

What's really confusing is how the other big labels under the LVMH umbrella, like Givenchy, Marc Jacobs, Fendi and Vuitton, seem unrestrained creatively and Dior seems to be on such a short leash. It doesn't make sense.

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here is the "Bar suit" mentioned, for anyone who was wondering..
S/S 1947

vam.ac.uk

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike413 View Post
What's really confusing is how the other big labels under the LVMH umbrella, like Givenchy, Marc Jacobs, Fendi and Vuitton, seem unrestrained creatively and Dior seems to be on such a short leash. It doesn't make sense.
that's because Dior doesn't fall under the LVMH umbrella? idk, but Dior is part of Christian Dior SA, which partially owns LVMH, while both of those companies are owned by Arnault.

it's the same CEO and same owner, but not the same board and people else.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Dior_SA

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^ Forgot that little detail.

John's kinda f***ed then, isn't he?

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^ No he isn't: he is one of the wealthiest designers ever lived.

He is blessed with many many things including an endless supply of materials, techniques and above all money to do anything he wants. I do also blame Arnault for many things, but I seriously do not think if Galliano wanted to do things a bit more creative like what Marc has been pursuing now, then he would be allowed to.

I know LV clothes do not sell at all, and it is only the bags that matter for Marc and his team, but still, I seriously began to question John's taste and vision now in the 21st Century. It is easy to blame the management, but Arnault gave so much to designers and fashion at large. He is the person who paid all the bills for almost everything we saw and loved so far from many many prominent designers. I am sure he would allow John to stretch his imagination a little and come up with things similar to what Karl is accomplishing over at Chanel -a privately owned company I might add.

Dior looks dated and cheap. And John and his team are the ones to blame here. After all, Arnault is not a creative force and I am sure he knows better than to meddle with these types of issues.

This article was posted before, but I think we may need to revisit it:

Quote:
Bernard Arnault Doesn't Like Plastic Pendants on His Dior Bags


So just how does the richest man in France, and one of the most powerful in fashion, do it? A profile in the March 2009 issue of WSJ. gives us a clue about the dealings of Bernard Arnault, CEO of LVMH, who Anna Wintour says "has a very strong understanding of what [his] designers do. If he’s concerned about something, he’ll speak up, but he’ll never tell them, ‘Do this’ or ‘Do that.”

But he will give them a strong hint. When John Galliano was presenting the Pre-Fall 2009 collection to buyers in Paris, Arnault came to oversee. Twenty-three models are escorted in for Arnault's perusal, and Galliano "reads nervously in English from a prepared speech to explain the source of his inspiration: Dior seen through the erotic lens of photographer Helmut Newton":

Arnault, seated on a white sofa, focuses on two ingredients: Is the piece “Dior” enough and is it priced right? “Ah, this is true Dior,” he states definitively of a black waist-cinched suit with pleated pockets. “It’s Dior safari,” he says of a beige coat with fox-fur collar. A skirt suit in Prince of Wales check appears: “The Dior woman will like this and will want to come back season after season,” he says.

"Ça, c’est beau — how much is it?” Arnault asks as a tall blond model stands before him in a $1,500 red double-face wool dress. “Will that sell?” he asks of an embroidered $15,000 cream-colored gown. (The answer was yes, in Monaco, Hong Kong and Moscow.) “Why not use those black masks for the ad campaign?” “If you tell me so, sir,” Galliano answers.


But the "obsessing," as Arnault's wife, Helene Mercier, puts it, really begins when he spots a $750 red-rimmed cotton canvas bag:

“I just don’t like it. I don’t like it at all." He tugs disapprovingly on a round plastic pendant on the bag’s handle. “Can this be taken off?” he asks the cluster of Dior executives standing behind him. He takes the bag off its perch and continues: “The black and gray versions of the bag are already bordering on the commercial, but the red goes too far . . . it’s just not Dior.”


“What do you think?” Arnault asks Delphine Arnault-Gancia, 33, his daughter from his first marriage, who is Dior’s deputy managing director. She slings the bag over her shoulder and pushes her long blond hair out of the way. “It grows on you,” she answers uneasily. She gestures toward her light gray tweed suit and black patent heels. “Don’t imagine it with what I’m wearing, think of it with jeans.”

Arnault turns to Galliano. “John, help me out here. Do you like it?” he asks. “It’s for a younger crowd,” the designer ventures. “Think of it for the streets of St. Tropez.” Arnault shakes his head. “I don’t like it,” he says. “I don’t want to see it in stores.”
Arnault may invoke fear in those around him, but he likes to paint himself as "understanding": “Designers are closer to artists than to engineers. They’re not like normal managers, and you have to balance their creativity and rationality. John, Karl, Marc, they’re genius. You can’t put them into a rational environment. They’re sometimes late, and you have to accept that if you work with them, you have to be understanding with them.”

That doesn't sound that horrid to me. If he doesn't care about these things, then Dior would be nowhere today. And I am sure the bag he rejected was atrocious to begin with. A '$750 red-rimmed cotton canvas bag'? It doesn't really sound like Chanel's biggest competition, does it?

He likes to elevate the look and feeling, and yes, it sounds like he is demanding, but why should he sacrifice from business when Dior could earn so much money while keeping things luxe and affluent? The creative team must deliver more appropriate products, else they should be replaced. (Not John, since he renewed his contract indefinitely I think)



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these articles really do shed light on what's going on internally at the house of dior. while i think the fashion elite may have gotten to the top hats at dior to get them to elevate the house to the grandeur of its former glory, they will do so to the detriment of their bottom line. yes, i understand that there's a certain breed of rich woman who stopped buying suits at the boutique, but here in america there's a certain strain of girl who goes to the mall who has stopped doing the dior thing. sure, they do the dior show cosmetics and will grab a dior bag to look different than their chanel and gucci clad peers, but they're not going crazy like they used to.

an earlier commenter said that dior's supposed to compete with chanel. i'm not sure that's completely fair. whoever mentioned that the dior girl and the gucci girl used to compete i think hit it right.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeijames View Post
these articles really do shed light on what's going on internally at the house of dior. while i think the fashion elite may have gotten to the top hats at dior to get them to elevate the house to the grandeur of its former glory, they will do so to the detriment of their bottom line. yes, i understand that there's a certain breed of rich woman who stopped buying suits at the boutique, but here in america there's a certain strain of girl who goes to the mall who has stopped doing the dior thing. sure, they do the dior show cosmetics and will grab a dior bag to look different than their chanel and gucci clad peers, but they're not going crazy like they used to.

an earlier commenter said that dior's supposed to compete with chanel. i'm not sure that's completely fair. whoever mentioned that the dior girl and the gucci girl used to compete i think hit it right.

Well I had said both things.

I think it used to be Dior vs. Gucci back in early 2000s - Galliano vs. Ford. With accessories, it-bags and ultra sexy clothing and everything. Each brand used to release some new item or product constantly to compete with each other, and women went crazy along the way. The it-bags, the shoes, the logos all over the place... Such spectacle. But now, it seems Dior tries to position its image and place in the luxury industry against Chanel with much more sell-able couture, endless cosmetic and fragrance releases, fine jewelry, skincare, make-up, RtW and costume jewelry, moviestars as spokespeople etc. etc....

Gucci is a different business altogether. they are just about selling bags and shoes now. Much more like LV, to my opinion.

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^ That article though kind of goes against what you're saying, Pasha. Clearly Arnault is meddling in the creative process, and it doesn't seem like that was always the case if the archives are anything to go by. If Arnault is deciding what is and is not "Dior" then how are John and his team to blame for simply giving the boss what he feels is right? Granted it could be done in a marginally better way, but if John's instinct isn't to do bland, tasteful tweed skirt suits surely the result isn't going to be all that spectacular. These recent Dior collections have this underlying feel of defeat to them. There's no enjoyment, no passion, no creative burn to them, and I just can't bring myself to believe that it's because Galliano is just not working hard enough.

And I don't know that I'd really compare Dior RTW to Chanel RTW. Couture, maybe, but not the RTW.

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