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27-10-2010
  76
clever ain't wise
 
iluvjeisa's Avatar
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheVeed View Post
Completely agree but again, those ads probably (not certain, but probably) were the art director's direction. Nothing a retoucher does can go past a director; the client is the one who dictates what to do and how far. Nothing can be published without the approval of the client.

There are tons of bad retouchers out there, as in any occupation, but nothing can go to press without the consent of the client.



EXACTLY. This is also one of the reasons why it is next to impossible for another supermodel to emerge. Celebrities have taken their place, and why? Because they can look just as good as models now. Julianne Moore, gorgeous 40-something, retouched (very well, I might add) to look younger than Karen Elson on Vogue Paris. Any US Vogue cover you look at, you see these flawless celebrities with their beautiful bodies and their glowy skin.

Models once represented a small genetic pool of women who had an out-of-world presence, of beauty. When every single person on a magazine cover can look like that now, well... there's no need for a model spokeswoman anymore.

Drew Barrymore for Cover Girl anyone?
First, I'm completely with you there. The retoucher made the least grievous mistake because it could be that he is churning things out mindlessly and simply overwrote the image he wanted to send with an image that was portrayed a mythological monster. At least two people made a horrible mistake in the making of some of these ads that have cropped up lately, that much is for sure.

Second, there is an easy way to turn all this photoshopping idiocy around. You can show real images of the people that actually are so beautiful that they need next to no retouching - and you could preserve the air of something real....if that was the accepted standard it would require much more work to get most of the actresses to look as good as models...

But that requires the return of texture. As long as it's ok to use ridiculous smoothing techniques on everything without this turning people off, I suppose it's never going to change.

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30-10-2010
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"I’ve seen my photos form Balenciaga recently and thought: “Am I that thin?” but than I realized that my arms were retouched in order to make them too thin. Maybe they just need a sort of sensation, like look at this poor thing... so thin.. how does she even walk?"
-Vlada Roslyakova
Not sure if this quote is relevant but hey, she's addressing retouching!

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09-12-2010
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windowshopping
 
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While I am in no way excusing the "three legged model" look, and object to reshaping models faces or bodies, it is pretty clear to me that some retouching is required by most clients.

I remember the first time I did a shoot for a MUAs book, my thoughts were "I need to show off this persons skill, so will do minimal Photoshop work".

I removed obvious skin imperfections but left it at that (the MUA was very happy with the shots). Later that week I decided to try out a few Photoshop techniques on the skin to make it very smooth while retaining skin texture. I asked the MUA what she thought (I thought I might have overdone it) and she said she absolutely adored the shots and was amazed at how good they looked.

My guess is that untouched shots would be rejected by most magazines.

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10-12-2010
  79
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the thing is...if we see models or actors and actresses looking so perfect, flaw not just less but like i said - perfect-, we want to know what special things they do or what products they use to have achieve this perfection, we then would follow their routine but after achieving nothing but...we end up disappointed and shift focus to another perfect picture seen on the magazine and same thing goes....

it's a very insecure world we are in

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13-12-2010
  80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fraiseap View Post
While I am in no way excusing the "three legged model" look, and object to reshaping models faces or bodies, it is pretty clear to me that some retouching is required by most clients.

I remember the first time I did a shoot for a MUAs book, my thoughts were "I need to show off this persons skill, so will do minimal Photoshop work".

I removed obvious skin imperfections but left it at that (the MUA was very happy with the shots). Later that week I decided to try out a few Photoshop techniques on the skin to make it very smooth while retaining skin texture. I asked the MUA what she thought (I thought I might have overdone it) and she said she absolutely adored the shots and was amazed at how good they looked.

My guess is that untouched shots would be rejected by most magazines.
And if you ask me, they're idiots for it. It's easy to focus on the detail - and of course you have to - but a necessary requirement for any artist should be able to travel between a detail-oriented and a holistic view.

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13-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iluvjeisa View Post
And if you ask me, they're idiots for it. It's easy to focus on the detail - and of course you have to - but a necessary requirement for any artist should be able to travel between a detail-oriented and a holistic view.
I totally agree. I like my photographs to show what I am seeing during the shoot, not some idealised version of it. But I have just flicked through the Jan edition of UK Vogue and, excluding the paparazzi style and catwalk shots, I got to page 100 without seeing a single image that did not look obviously photoshopped.

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13-12-2010
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i have no problem with photoshop! it can be pretty useful sometimes,but what i don't like about it,is that they are over use it in make up campaigns!!!you can't eved read her facial expressions!!it's just bad!

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27-07-2011
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L'Oréal's Julia Roberts and Christy Turlington ad campaigns banned
http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011...erts-ad-banned
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...=feeds-newsxml

I heard this in the photoshop disasters' thread, thanks to jml2 and coco24 I think the news fits well here.

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06-08-2011
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Photoshop or retouching are a necessary evil. On one hand you can't really blame anyone for using it; because if I were a company selling clothes or make up, you want to make them look as good as possible, and where the lighting, the model or the make up has failed you fill in the gaps. A little, a lot, or just too much.
On the other hand, even if we KNOW that what we see isn't real, it somehow affects me still. I notice that whenever I read lots of magazines or see a lot of photos of shows with their great lighting and thinner than thin girls, I start to be much more insecure. Even though I know that it is a lot of fake and enhancement that makes them look that good.

That's how I feel, but I do not have a definitive answer as to what one should do about this..

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11-08-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiecheeks View Post
Photoshop or retouching are a necessary evil. On one hand you can't really blame anyone for using it; because if I were a company selling clothes or make up, you want to make them look as good as possible, and where the lighting, the model or the make up has failed you fill in the gaps. A little, a lot, or just too much.
On the other hand, even if we KNOW that what we see isn't real, it somehow affects me still. I notice that whenever I read lots of magazines or see a lot of photos of shows with their great lighting and thinner than thin girls, I start to be much more insecure. Even though I know that it is a lot of fake and enhancement that makes them look that good.

That's how I feel, but I do not have a definitive answer as to what one should do about this..
I guess the problem is that it's their job to make the ads look appealing. It's simply not appealing to see the same idiotic filter, the same silly tricks over and over.

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12-08-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iluvjeisa View Post
I guess the problem is that it's their job to make the ads look appealing. It's simply not appealing to see the same idiotic filter, the same silly tricks over and over.
What tricks exactly?

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12-08-2011
  87
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We look to the pages of fashion magazines for fantasy, but it used to be that those effects were created by experience and skill - with lighting and angles - and constrained by other things - such as time and cost of film - and from that combination of factors, pictures were produced that had some degree of spirit and soul. Even when visual perfection was achieved, there was still a sense of connection with the person in the shot.

These days, everything can be created so cheaply, that it's become a plastic world of disposable imagery, where you can take a thousand shots without having to think too much about it, and piece together body parts until you get the picture you desire, post-processing all signs of imperfection from people until you end up with a fantasy world so flat, it diminishes imagination.

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30-07-2016
  88
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I think Photoshop starts when you wash your face and there is a long way to make a precious picture so when we see Maria Antoniette paint we have to think that she was "photoshoped" by her artist.

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