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20-04-2006
  136
Power to the 99%
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by litchickuk
to be honest im not eco friendly and i really dont give it a second thought. i know i should but i have enough to worry about already! but this is just me!
Hopefully this will change as you get older

Being green isn't about worrying ... it's about "being the change you want to see in the world." It's about living life the way you believe it should be lived. It's about refusing to surrender to the tide of the mindless majority and the power junkies of the amoral ruling class. It's about making the world a better place, and it's also about sensual pleasure ... like stepping out of bed onto a baby-soft organic cotton rug.

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25-04-2006
  137
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eco style in uk exhibition
the eco friendly fashion trend is holding strong, check out this info on a new fashion exhibition in London

photo and article credited to telegraph.co.uk

Quote:


Red button bag by Edson Raupp, suitcase-london.com

A new exhibition at the Crafts Council aims to prove that clothes needn't cost the earth. Curator Rebecca Earley has brought together eco designers who are producing beautiful, innovative, and well-constructed garments.

She says: 'Well Fashioned presents a vision of the role fashion might play in our ecological future. Sometimes regarded by eco-thinkers as frivolous and unnecessary, fashion can play a vital part in creating our identity and cultural language.'

Well Fashioned: Eco Style in the UK is at the Crafts Council Gallery until June 4 (44a Pentonville Rd, Islington, London, 020 7278 7700, craftscouncil.org.uk/wellfashioned), then tours nationwide

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26-04-2006
  138
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In Sustainable "mode"
I have recently seen more and more articles about 'eco-fashion' and 'green is the new black' etc in the UK and worldwide press.

With £3 jeans being retailed in British supermarkets, its not difficult to work out that the costs go somewhere else . . . .

Are sustainability and fashion mutually exclusive, a contradiction in terms? Can you be stylish and sustainable, or does eco-fashion still equal 'granola' green style?

Fashion designer and blogger, Jill Danyelle is doing a project in New York, documenting her efforts in sustainable style, http://www.fiftyrx3.blogspot.com/

Do you think about issues such as the environment, anti-consumerism or labour practices when you buy?

Is vintage sustainable when you get it shipped around the world?

Any thoughts, stories, pictures about these issues?

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Last edited by fash ho'; 26-04-2006 at 01:43 PM.
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26-04-2006
  139
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I'm big on the environment as well..I'd definitely love to see what's going on with this in the future.

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26-04-2006
  140
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that's very interesting, i'd love to see something made out of eco-friendly materials...and see how long it lasts...

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27-04-2006
  141
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fash ho'
Are sustainability and fashion mutually exclusive, a contradiction in terms? Can you be stylish and sustainable, or does eco-fashion still equal 'granola' green style?

Do you think about issues such as the environment, anti-consumerism or labour practices when you buy?

Is vintage sustainable when you get it shipped around the world?

Any thoughts, stories, pictures about these issues?
Hi Fash ho'! Good thread, these are all issues I think about a lot. To the first questions: heavens no, sustainability and fashion are not mutually exclusive...I don't understand why the market seems to believe ecological fashion has to equal "granola" style either. Perhaps some random statistic exists that the greatest market of aware buyers prefers this style, I don't know. The only thing I perhaps find regrettable in terms of the fashion business system, besides the way it's manufactured...is that fashion is treated so disposably. I hate the idea of trends, as well as the system of churning out two collections yearly, advertising them to death, and throwing out previous leftovers. I think that, besides the waste, it gets pretty boring, and discourages the production of, and appreciation of, really good pieces that can be respected for decades to come.

Otherwise, haute couture is pretty sustainable, no? I also like to wear good items for a long time, and vintage has always been a favorite way to shop for many reasons.

I'm not sure I understand the question about vintage being shipped around the world, though.

Have you looked in the fair trade thread? It's a good thread, with various sources and issues being discussed. I have a feeling maybe not many people responded because of there being similar threads and because of the wide scope of this one. Thanks for bringing it up, it's a topic that can never be discussed enough.

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27-04-2006
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hi melisande

yes, i searched on 'sustainability' but couldn't find anything. of course, the social side/fair trade is where i should look - thanks for the tip.

the vintage thing - i was just thinking the other day that i sometimes buy dresses from ebay and get them shipped from the US to Denmark, which has its own environmental implication, lessening the overall sustainability.

and there is a vintage shop here that sells dresses bought from a second-hand clothes market in uganda, imported by charities collecting clothes in developed countries such as the UK or DK and sending them to developing countries.

that means you could buy a vintage dress that has been around the world twice!

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28-04-2006
  143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MulletProof
that's very interesting, i'd love to see something made out of eco-friendly materials...and see how long it lasts...
I have quite a few things made of organic cotton, and they've lasted admirably. Linen is considered green because it doesn't require pesticides, same for hemp. I don't have anything hemp, but I've read it wears like iron. These are the exact same fibers that were used when garments were passed down from generation to generation. Tencel wears very well in my experience.

Now they certainly don't have a half-life ... You may not be able to wear polyester out, but it can certainly be snagged to death.

It wasn't long ago that there were no eco-unfriendly materials. See what I'm saying? This is not something untried--this worked for millennia.

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08-05-2006
  144
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Luxury industry - a new direction
sharing extracts of an interesting article i've found at wwd of today..

Quote:
Luxe Conference Looks at 'New Direction'

By Liza Casabona
The luxury industry may have to adapt to a new moral compass point, industry executives said.

The mood at a conference on "New Directions for Luxury" last week at the Four Seasons here took an unexpected turn as some participants lamented the excess in the luxury market. They also implored their colleagues to increase the social responsibility of the industry and focus their efforts on returning to simple, high-quality products.

Speakers at the conference, sponsored by Vanity Fair magazine and Luxury briefing, pointed to artificial ski slopes in the deserts of Dubai, a glut of celebrity endorsements, dental bling and aspirational lifestyles run amok as evidence of a world that has lost sight of the meaning of luxury. Consumers are weary of excess, they said, noting that a turning point could be approaching.

"For every cash-happy Muscovite luxury enlists to its ranks, there are five others about to go AWOL," said Jeffrey Miller, creative consultant and columnist for Luxury Briefing. The feeling of never having enough for consumers is pervasive and, in the face of terrorism, global conflicts, toxins and other social forces, consumers are growing tired of the message, he warned.

"Embellish your brand with goodness and restore luxury to its lofty heights," Miller said.

Everyone has to find the point that is comfortable for their business, said Jim Gold, president and chief executive officer of Bergdorf Goodman. It's up to an individual company to operate responsibly and run successfully.

"The whole thing starts with how consumer-centric you are and where your customer is ... If you're in a multicultural and multinational world, luxury is relative," Gold said. A return to a quieter, understated luxury may follow over-commercialization, he said.

Consumer awareness has already prompted some shifts in the fashion industry. Fair trade-certified fabrics have found their way into major European retailers in response to the ethical concerns of customers. The luxury industry at large can continue to find a way to balance the wants and needs of its customers with global awareness.

"We just have to care," said Gordon Campbell Gray, chief executive officer of London's One Aldwych hotel and the Carlisle Bay resort in Antigua. "We have to care about every product in our stores."
extracts from an article printed at wwd of today
source: www.wwd.com

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08-05-2006
  145
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Thanks for the article, it's nice to see that the industry seems to be finally reacting...

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08-05-2006
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thanks for merging, Lena


i went to the Crafts Council exhibition and quite enjoyed it, although i had seen many of the same labels or designer/makers at the Ethical Fashion Show last year in Paris. Its still a small, niche market but then, big retailers like Marks and Spencer are starting to develop quotas for organic cotton etc which may bring about a sea change.

I really like the blog I mention above www.fiftyrx3.com. She posts pictures of her outfits and made a dress out of umbrellas that she found on the streets of New York.

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Last edited by fash ho'; 08-05-2006 at 12:18 PM.
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08-05-2006
  147
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interesting. i recently heard of a movement called "voluntary simplicity" which attempts to achieve a better quality of life by minimizing consumption.
I think the main proponent or author is Duane Elgin.

perhaps social, ethical and environmental considerations (embellishing with goodness, as he puts it) will be the new luxe in the same way that organic food is purveyed as 'good quality'.

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08-05-2006
  148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fash ho'
interesting. i recently heard of a movement called "voluntary simplicity" which attempts to achieve a better quality of life by minimizing consumption.
I think the main proponent or author is Duane Elgin.

perhaps social, ethical and environmental considerations (embellishing with goodness, as he puts it) will be the new luxe in the same way that organic food is purveyed as 'good quality'.
agreed, what an excellent point fash ho'

we just decided to merge all 'ethical consuming' discussions in one
(thanks to tott and fff )

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08-05-2006
  149
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ooo i like this thread. its nice to know that the sustainability movement is getting interested in design & art. i usually buy second hand clothing, but would support this if they made things that were more stylish then what i have seen in the past.

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09-05-2006
  150
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i did a little search on this, and came up with this article from the people tree website:
Quote:
Garment factory workers in Bangladesh ask you to put pressure on fashion retailers to improve their working conditions and wages - NOT to stop buying their products.

I was introduced to Amirul Haque Amin of the National Garment Workers Federation (NGWF) 6 years ago, in my capacity as the founder and director Global Village, People Tree's sister NGO organisation (which based is Japan). Since then we have been giving NGWF financial support and working together to campaign for the rights of garment factory workers in Bangladesh.


I remember this time last year being stood up by Amin - who is never late for a meeting. Unable to get through to him, I knew something was up.
Spectrum Factory illegally constructed 30km from Dhaka had collapsed killing 64 people and injuring 74. The factory was making orders for Inditex, the owner of Zara and other brands. Amin had been called out in the middle of the night when the disaster struck - people were still being pulled out of the rubble when he arrived. The NGWF organised to take the factory management to court and to fight for workers outstanding wages and severance pay.


Zara set up a fund for £35,000 to provide some compensation to workers' families and the injured, "a very small price to pay for life", but this is more than other brands have done, many of which have not yet given a penny.
People Tree immediately sent over US$2,000 additional funds and launched the People Tree and Global Village 'Fair Trade NOW' wrist band in Japan, to help fund NGWF campaigns for safer factories and garment workers' rights.
But there is still a great deal of work to do; textile factory tragedies happen all too frequently in Bangladesh.
i'm a little confused because i was just in zara today and noticed they have new tees made from organic cotton (i got one!)

so they support organic materials, but not fair trade? don't the two usually go hand in hand?

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