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09-05-2006
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damn that is a horrible story.
and the compensation amounts are a pittance!

actually, i don't necessarily think that organic and fair trade go hand in hand for big retailers like zara or gap.

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11-05-2006
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Found this online shop of some quite nice sustainable clothes and stuff.


http://www.cocosshoppe.com/
At Coco's Shoppe you'll find a tightly edited selection of boutique fashion and prestige beauty from lines incorporating organic, fair trade, renewable, recycled or sustainable textiles or ingredients into their products without sacrificing an ounce of style.
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11-05-2006
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^ great site, fash ho. thanks for sharing. especially loving those ananas bags.

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12-05-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fash ho'
interesting. i recently heard of a movement called "voluntary simplicity" which attempts to achieve a better quality of life by minimizing consumption.
I think the main proponent or author is Duane Elgin.

perhaps social, ethical and environmental considerations (embellishing with goodness, as he puts it) will be the new luxe in the same way that organic food is purveyed as 'good quality'.
How interesting! Voluntary simplicity... What do you think that could mean to you in your own lives?

Although this is the first time I hear it, I feel that the term sums up my ethical/aesthetical ideals perfectly. For me, the ultimate luxe in life is to live in a certain "material peace".

What I mean by that is a life without the constant hassle of taking care of things I own, responding to impulses imposed on me by commercials, thinking what to buy next, making up material needs when what I really lack is, for example, the company of friends, or a moment to relax on my own. It means peace from the constant intrusion of commercial impulses.

This has meant that I try to cut down on all material consumption, and where I can't avoid consuming, I try to choose the most ethically/ecologically sustainable option. I have also given away my tv and have banned ads from my mail. It has not been any sort of a sacrifice but something I felt I needed to do in order to protect myself, my sanity and the sanctity of my home as a place where I calm down and recharge.

My bottom line is that frugality and aesthetics need not be mutually exclusive, on the contrary. I love beautiful clothes and things as much as the next tFS:er. But I find that I need to be very critical about what things I let into my life. The beauty of things needs room, both spatial and temporal, so that it can be fully appreciated.

As for the style aspect, I only buy clothes that I am positive I will wear and love a long time. That the clothes are almost exclusively second hand is both ethical and aesthetical choice. Using second hand doesn't need to mean vintage style either. By now there is such and overabundance of things in the world that almost new clothes will be dumped to charity shops, and from the way I dress you could never tell where my clothes come from. Almost all my clothes are made well of high quality materials, silks, wools, cottons that feel sublime on the skin, and will last ages. I don't have a master bedroom sized closet, but I know that the things I do have are all just what I need.

The modern commercial lifestyle has turned material consumption into something ridiculous. Buying things, thinking about buying them, talking about buying them, all this is taking up more and more space in the lives of people. I find it terrifying to meet a friend, and afterwards realize that all we talked about was what we had bought, intended to buy or wished we could. It feels clear to me that this is not a lifestyle that can be sustained over longer periods of time anymore: the ecosystem simply cannot handle it. So as well as for my own peace of mind, I think that a lifestyle of voluntary simplicity is the right thing to do towards other people and the planet, too.

I'm sorry I've babbled on so long. The idea just struck a cord with me! Now I'd love to hear other thoughts on the subject, too


Last edited by Nyx; 12-05-2006 at 08:27 AM.
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12-05-2006
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I think it's a good idea, but most of the things I've seen are very plain, besides I'm not really into ethical causes although if I saw something I really liked I would definately buy it.

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12-05-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Louna

What I mean by that is a life without the constant hassle of taking care of things I own, responding to impulses imposed on me by commercials, thinking what to buy next, making up material needs when what I really lack is, for example, the company of friends, or a moment to relax on my own. It means peace from the constant intrusion of commercial impulses.
Great post, Louna. There is so much that I agree with here.
Ironically, I read your post, taking a tea break after spending the whole day sorting my wardrobe out; moving winter clothes, boots, coats to the attic, hanging out summer clothes, weeding out stuff to sell at the flea market, give to the charity shop or get tailored.
I have spent so much time on this recently; last sunday i spent all day selling stuff at a flea market, before that I was bringing stuff down from the attic and sorting out.

About halfway through today, i just felt really bogged down with all this crap that i have accumulated. Part of the impetus for this big sort-out was to get some 'lightness' and clarity in my life.
I also buy about half of my stuff vintage and am proud of my collection of beautiful old things, but I am not immune to trends and want to move towards lighter and more discerning consumption of clothes. If I loved each item of clothing more, i wouldn't need so much . . . .

(on a purely superficial note, I have come to the realisation that part of my over-consumption of clothes is the elusive promise that an item can bring in terms of making me look skinny and fabulous. its pretty stupid that if some of the time i have spent thinking about clothes, buying them, washing and ironing them etc, I could have spent at the gym or doing yoga or something and then i might not have needed a new garment to make me feel better.

i think when you look after yourself, you can use clothes to express yourself truly, rather than then hide/cover/disguise yourself or boost your self-esteem)

sorry that was a digression . . . .


i know i can sometimes get in a 'bubble' with the whole sustainability thing, but i don't understand not 'being into' ethical causes as such. i am definitely no evangelist and so far my sustainable choices only really extend to vintage, but the more i know about clothing production, the more sustainable clothes make sense to me.
its like, since the bse crisis in the UK and the whole media thing about 'mechanically recovered' meat, i find it more difficult to eat hotdogs (or any kind of meat in a 'tube').
of course, when i have had a few drinks, a shawarma or kebab can seem like a good idea, but in the cold light of day, now that i know about intensive meat production

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Last edited by fash ho'; 12-05-2006 at 09:51 AM.
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12-05-2006
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excellent posts and links

ethical consuming is the best thing that happen to social behaviourism in ages.

on a personal level i'm on my way to excell in being an anti consumist, the less i buy the better i feel

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12-05-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Louna
How interesting! Voluntary simplicity... What do you think that could mean to you in your own lives?

Although this is the first time I hear it, I feel that the term sums up my ethical/aesthetical ideals perfectly. For me, the ultimate luxe in life is to live in a certain "material peace".

What I mean by that is a life without the constant hassle of taking care of things I own, responding to impulses imposed on me by commercials, thinking what to buy next, making up material needs when what I really lack is, for example, the company of friends, or a moment to relax on my own. It means peace from the constant intrusion of commercial impulses.

This has meant that I try to cut down on all material consumption, and where I can't avoid consuming, I try to choose the most ethically/ecologically sustainable option. I have also given away my tv and have banned ads from my mail. It has not been any sort of a sacrifice but something I felt I needed to do in order to protect myself, my sanity and the sanctity of my home as a place where I calm down and recharge.

My bottom line is that frugality and aesthetics need not be mutually exclusive, on the contrary. I love beautiful clothes and things as much as the next tFS:er. But I find that I need to be very critical about what things I let into my life. The beauty of things needs room, both spatial and temporal, so that it can be fully appreciated.

As for the style aspect, I only buy clothes that I am positive I will wear and love a long time. That the clothes are almost exclusively second hand is both ethical and aesthetical choice. Using second hand doesn't need to mean vintage style either. By now there is such and overabundance of things in the world that almost new clothes will be dumped to charity shops, and from the way I dress you could never tell where my clothes come from. Almost all my clothes are made well of high quality materials, silks, wools, cottons that feel sublime on the skin, and will last ages. I don't have a master bedroom sized closet, but I know that the things I do have are all just what I need.

The modern commercial lifestyle has turned material consumption into something ridiculous. Buying things, thinking about buying them, talking about buying them, all this is taking up more and more space in the lives of people. I find it terrifying to meet a friend, and afterwards realize that all we talked about was what we had bought, intended to buy or wished we could. It feels clear to me that this is not a lifestyle that can be sustained over longer periods of time anymore: the ecosystem simply cannot handle it. So as well as for my own peace of mind, I think that a lifestyle of voluntary simplicity is the right thing to do towards other people and the planet, too.

I'm sorry I've babbled on so long. The idea just struck a cord with me! Now I'd love to hear other thoughts on the subject, too
Louna, I love what you said, it's definitely something to aspire to.

I have the same approach to clothes in terms of buying a few high-quality things I really love.

I'm far less acquisitive than I used to be ... I realize now that a constant need to acquire "stuff" says something about me, and it's not something good I need to get better about giving things away that I no longer want or need. I've gotten a lot better about what I bring in, but not too much has really left

I also like the idea that being less acquisitive makes it possible to *experience* more, in terms of great food and wine and travel ... things that add richness rather than physical drag to my life ... and needless to say, being less acquisitive makes it possible for me to do more to benefit others rather than just grabbing more that I don't really need, and only temporarily want, for myself.

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Last edited by fashionista-ta; 12-05-2006 at 01:42 PM.
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14-05-2006
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i tried to stop wanting so much awhile back and it felt great. then i came back down to reality and continued to watch too much tv, spend too much time online, and shopping excessively.

i chalk it up to being so young, but i will try and try to stop wanting things and i can't. the phase i went through was start though...even when i get something really nice, i still move on to wanting the NEXT bag or NEXT pair of shoes...which isn't at all healthy for anyone.

i had no idea velvet was an eco/ethics friendly label. i've shopped that brand for years and everything has held up incredibly well, unlike my edun t-shirts.

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14-05-2006
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This company is pretty interesting. I think I posted it somewhere before, but couldn't find it looking back. Pictures from the Ad Busters website

http://adbusters.org/metas/corpo/bla...shoes/home.php


This is your chance to unswoosh Nike's tired old swoosh and give birth to a new kind of cool in the sneaker industry.

  • 100% organic hemp upper
  • made in a union shop
  • hand drawn logo & sweet spot
  • designed by John Fluevog
  • produced by Vegetarian Shoes
Once a shareholder you get every other pair of Blackspot sneakers for only $55. That means that if you are buying two pairs today, you'll get $6.50 off.

Shipping in the USA takes 1-3 weeks, Canada 1-3 weeks, UK 1-3 weeks, and everywhere else is 2-6 weeks
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14-05-2006
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And the other pair
  • 100% organic hemp upper
  • recycled tire sole
  • made in a union shop
  • hand drawn logo & sweet spot
  • unique "dirty wash"
  • designed by John Fluevog
  • produced by Vegetarian Shoes
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14-05-2006
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I love CocosShoppe.com too
Hi,
This is my first time posting...a friend recenlty turned me on to this site and it was so fabulous to find an 'ethical shopping' thread.

Anyway....I went to check out CocosShoppe.com and love it. I found this line Deborah Lindquist who uses recycled cashmere and bought one of her tank tops as well as the Burning Torch Tunic you put up on your post.

THANK YOU for highlighting eco- fashion.




Quote:
Originally Posted by fash ho'
Found this online shop of some quite nice sustainable clothes and stuff.


http://www.cocosshoppe.com/
At Coco's Shoppe you'll find a tightly edited selection of boutique fashion and prestige beauty from lines incorporating organic, fair trade, renewable, recycled or sustainable textiles or ingredients into their products without sacrificing an ounce of style.

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16-05-2006
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hi oak, welcome to tfs.

do you have any other ethical fashion recommendations?


I keep hearing about this brand keepandshare. www.keepandshare.co.uk.

Its very nice 'alternative luxury' knitwear and the idea is that you keep the item as it 'satisfies over time'. i don't know how much ecological yarn she uses but some of it is quite sweet. The webpage has a 'share' section where people share some stories about items that they have had for ages and ages.


credit: keepandshare.co.uk
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File Type: jpg Clipboard02.jpg (57.7 KB, 2 views)

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18-05-2006
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shoegal, i love the concept of the Blackspots but i know someone who has them and she says they are so uncomfortable . . pity.

The Global Clothes Carousel


It is the kind of dress that some people would only consider appropriate for a costume party; one in which you could come dressed as Margot from the late 1970’s British television show “The Good Life”. High-necked in sherbet-peach polyester, with a yoked front picked out in frothy lace and billowing chiffon sleeves; it fell to the floor in a dramatic cascade of synthetic fabric. This item is just one on a rack of many of its type; beyond retro and good taste but strangely desirable amongst Copenhagen’s female hipsters who seek out vintage style beyond H&M’s cheap mainstream or too-obvious high-end designer labels. The pursuit of old clothes is not a Danish phenomenon; vintage style “has become a mainstream and highly commodified fashion alternative to wearing new designs. . . a sign of individuality and connoisseurship.”[1]. The purchase and consumption of this dress not only differentiates the customer from mainstream fashions, it also means that they have side-stepped the mass-production system – a positive benefit for the more sustainable- or ethically minded vintage hunter.

What they may not realise, however, although the resale of this dress is decoupled from the current garment production industry, it could hardly be regarded as a sustainable choice, in the light of its travel history.

This British-made garment, along with many others was picked up for pennies by the Danish shop-owner at a second-hand clothing market in Kampala, the capital of Uganda; a market filled with the used garments donated by people living in Europe to charities who then ship it on to Africa. Thus, the garment may have travelled up to 10,000 miles in its lifetime, more if the fabric or garment was manufactured in the US or a developing country in the first place.

According to a 2005 Oxfam report, the “global trade in second-hand clothing is worth more than $1 billion each year”[2] and not only provides a source of inexpensive apparel but also contributes to employment in the recipient country. Clothes that are donated by western consumers to the clothing recycling banks in supermarkets and outside charity shops are not usually given freely as aid to developing countries. Instead, due to the surplus of donated clothing which the charities cannot handle, some of the banks are owned by purely commercial concerns – rag traders who pay a nominal annual fee to carry the charity name.[3] These merchants then sort and grade the garments to be shipped abroad to Africa, where it is bought by the bale by clothes traders to sell on in smaller quantities to individual market sellers. These small traders often travel miles out of the African bush to collect the garments to sell in the city markets. Finally, the garments are then bought for a few pounds by other working Ugandans and provide a cheap source of quality style for many Africans.

It is a viable industry in which waste which is actually given away, becomes a resource providing a chain of income that stretches from the developed to the developing world. What is surprising is the fact that most people who donate clothes to these clothing banks may not be aware of what actually happens to the clothes, or realise that in fact other interests own the banks and pay as little as £100 a year per facility for the use of the charity’s name.[4] What has been given freely by people who have too much is eventually sold, albeit cheaply, to those who have too little. On the other hand, some development workers believe that this industry and the exchange of money for garments is better than simply giving it away as “constant handouts eventually demean the individual.”[5]

However, the BBC Panorama programme “The Dollar a Day Dress” highlights the double-edged sword, “No limits on second-hand imports, very low tariffs, it’s free trade at its most welcome. But the benefits of free trade can come at a price.” The price is that this second-hand clothes industry has helped undermined the local textile and clothing industries and is not supporting the Ugandan and other Sub-saharan economies in the process of becoming more self-sufficient and ‘sustainable’. Last year, the World Trade Organisation ruled that US cotton subsidies were in breach of its rules; these subsidies have been one of the chief issues beneath the demise of African textile and cotton industries. In addition, even without the second hand clothes market, it is questionable whether the local industries would ever recover, in the face of increasing imports of cheap clothing from Asia.[6]

So this polyester maxi-dress has come full circle back to Europe, as stock for a retro clothing store. The life story of this object goes beyond what Kopytoff calls its ‘cultural biography’,“ . . . the story of the various singularizations of it, of classification and reclassifications in an uncertain world of categories whose importance shifts with every minor change in context . . .”[7] . This dress and its biography illuminate both the positive and negative sustainability aspects of globalisation, free trade and the pursuit of style.

[1] Palmer, Alexander. Vintage Whores and Vintage Virgins: Second Hand Fashion in the Twenty-first Century in Old Clothes, New Looks. Palmer, Alexander and Hazel Clark (eds). (2005) Berg Publishers. p197.

[2] Baden, Sally and Catherine Barber. The impact of the second-hand clothing trade on developing countries. Oxfam, Sept 2005

[3] Durham, Michael. “Clothes Line” The Guardian. Wednesday February 25th, 2004.

[4] Durum, Michael.

[5] Durum, Michael.

[6] Baden. P2

[7] Kopytoff, Igor. (1986) The Cultural Biography of Things: Commoditization as Process. In The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective, edited by Arjun Appadurai. p64. Cambridge University Press.

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18-05-2006
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okay, its a bit dry, because I wrote it for this project i am doing on sustainability and fashion. but how crazy is this? I know the girl who's vintage store it is.

Will take a picture of a dress that has been around the world a few times . . .

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