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23-04-2007
  271
Power to the 99%
 
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^ Soooooooo sad

Exactly why it makes me so angry when people buy cheap crap at Wal-mart & the like & then toss it on the trash heap a few months--or weeks or days--later. Not only is it bad for the planet, but the present human cost is so tragic as well ...

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23-04-2007
  272
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i wrote a piece on nordic ethical designers for sterling magazine. a puff piece, mind you.

http://sterling-magazine.com/2007/01...-moral-fibres/

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23-04-2007
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^ Puff piece? I think that's a fine article! I really hope that eco-conscious business becomes the norm instead of a fad.

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
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24-04-2007
  274
V.I.P.
 
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The Wallpaper* Magazine Eco-Edit

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25-04-2007
  275
scenester
 
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I honestly would love to be able to be a more conscious consumer, since most companies use sweatshops. I automatically gain respect for a company/designer when I find out they don't use sweatshops to produce their clothes. Honestly, I'm very conflicted on the issue since I do feel guilty when I think about some kid making my clothes

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27-04-2007
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fads breed norms. i think it is part of the change.

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27-04-2007
  277
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I used to know where to go in the UK to buy my clothes but here in NZ I don't...we don't have as many of the major brands. Does anybody know about clothes in NZ selling eco and fair trade clothing?

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05-05-2007
  278
spoilt victorian child
 
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Essay in the NY Times that I think raises an important point about the problem with using environmentalism as a marketing angle to sell more products:
Quote:
Global Yawning
By BOB MORRIS
Published: May 6, 2007

I was running errands the other day when a pleasant young woman with a clipboard tried to stop me. “Do you have a moment for the environment, sir?” she asked.

“No,” I barked as I evaded her, “I don’t!”

I felt guilty, but also vindicated. I mean, of course I have a moment for the environment. Saying you’re not for the environment right now is like saying you’re not for education, children, world peace, Africa or a cure for cancer. These days you would have to be a fool or a lobbyist to dismiss global warming and natural resource issues.

But is it possible that all this marketing is cheapening the cause?

Must every hotel, restaurant, shampoo, detergent and beverage that is environmentally responsible talk so much about it? Yuban “sustainable development” coffee. Paul Mitchell “protecting our planet for generations to come.” Levi’s Eco jeans.

How much green-standing can we stand? It’s enough hot air to melt Antarctica.

In no time, an inconvenient truth has become an obnoxious one.

But from what I can see, there’s as much selling as thinking going on.

The other night I attended a magazine party in a photography studio that had been turned into an elaborate garden with 10-foot-high privet hedges fashioned from shrubbery trucked up from the South. After the party, the walls of greens went into a chipper for recycling.

“It’s giving back to the environment in a good way,” the decorator told me.
Sure. Unless you consider the fuel to truck all that greenery up from the South in the first place. I guess it could be worse. John Travolta, for instance, recently flew his own Boeing 707 to England to promote a new movie and urged everyone to “do their bit” to combat global warming.

Closer to home, meanwhile, the Sheryl Crow “Stop Global Warming College Tour” stipulated parking for three tractor-trailers, four buses and six cars. Ms. Crow is a spokeswoman for Revlon, a tour sponsor. Maybe I’m missing something. But is there anything green about that except money?

And cynical as this sounds, how does Vanity Fair, with its May “Green Issue,” reconcile its high-minded battle cry with all those pages selling cars, bottled water, watches, perfumes and clothes? Ads in the magazine for Diesel and Svedka vodka even mock global warming by suggesting you dress for the heat and add more ice to drinks.

I guess it’s all par for the golf course in a country where people are more interested in broadcasting their ideals than curtailing their consumption. How else would you explain buying “carbon credits” to offset your “carbon footprint?”

Not that it isn’t nice to do be able to do some penance by paying to support environmentally helpful projects. But are these projects all so well thought-out?

Even when the issues are green, things are rarely black or white.

Ethanol, for instance, is now under question for causing more smog than gasoline, according to a new Stanford University study. Oilseed rape, the new crop used for European biofuel that is especially popular in Germany, requires dangerously high levels of fertilizers and pesticides. Even those energy-efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs are problematic. They contain mercury. Companies and governments have not come up with convenient ways to recycle them, so people just throw them in the trash.

“In a bid to solve one problem,” said Chris Davies, a member of the European Parliament, “we risk creating another and making things worse.” He was referrring to a study warning that the rush to biofuels in Europe could decimate Asian rain forests.

I wonder what Mother Nature would say about all this. Perhaps she’d be pleased that so many mavericks are addressing the problems that have given her emphysema, making it necessary for Laurie David and Al Gore to step in to replace her.

Or perhaps she’d echo Ingrid Johnson, a professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology. “If you really want to be environmentally friendly, buy fewer things,” Ms. Johnson said. “It’s that simple. I mean how many pairs of jeans do you need? And how many shopping bags at Saks?”

Me? I’m no eco-saint. I do have a personal plea. But it’s for the social environment rather than the natural one: Please, tone it done. The world is in terrible shape right now. Global warming isn’t another happy opportunity for marketing clothes, candles and sustainable weddings or for green-washing your bad corporate karma.
It’s not about having a moment for the environment, either.

It’s about a lifetime.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/fashion/06age.html?ref=fashion

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05-05-2007
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^ There will always be those who are slow to act, unfortunately, and they always wait for someone to tell them what to do even though they know better.... sooner. The fact that celebrities get more attention for such serious issues as fair wage, fair trade and eco-friendly goods than the UN gets stuns me. But if that's what it takes for someone to take personal responsibility for ethical consumer choices, it's fine with me.

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05-05-2007
  280
etre soi-meme
 
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Quote:
“If you really want to be environmentally friendly, buy fewer things,” Ms. Johnson said. “It’s that simple. I mean how many pairs of jeans do you need? And how many shopping bags at Saks?”
this is the most eco-friendly attitude anyone can actually follow

buy less, consume less, live responsibly

as for ethical/eco/green attitudes being used by marketing gurus, of course its nothing new and will continue as a trend

anything 'green/ethical/charity' sells much better than anything else.

two blade swords are so much in fashion...

thanks for the repost droogist

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05-05-2007
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SomethingElse's Avatar
 
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Here is a link to the Ethical Consumer Organization which has a wealth of information about what each person can do to make a difference. http://www.ethicalconsumer.org/

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
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06-05-2007
  282
front row
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lena
“If you really want to be environmentally friendly, buy fewer things,” Ms. Johnson said. “It’s that simple. I mean how many pairs of jeans do you need? And how many shopping bags at Saks?”
i agree

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06-05-2007
  283
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Green Card: Eco-Fashion Steps Up
Renata Espinosa, 3 May 2007 - New York

It used to be that eco-conscious clothing meant hemp t-shirts and organic cotton yoga pants - fashion hadn't yet entered the equation.

Now, not only are there smaller niche designers to choose from like Linda Loudermilk and Elisa Jimenez, who have long used eco-friendly fabrics and production methods, but major fashion labels like Stella McCartney, Versace and Diesel are also producing clothes with Mother Earth in mind, using fabrics made from sustainable plants like bamboo and corn.

"It doesn't have to be an aesthetic sacrifice just because it's eco-friendly," said Jimenez at an Ingeo NatureWorks "Earth Month" event in New York on April 24. Ingeo is a synthetic fabric whose selling point is that it is made from a 100 percent renewable resource, corn, which Jimenez has been using in her collections for the past three years.

"It's not a trend, it's absolutely necessary," said Melissa Sack, who designs a line of sweatshop-free clothing called Moral Fervor with Emily Santamore. "People now shop at Whole Foods, they buy organic skincare and cleaning products, but fashion is the last frontier. It's been the slowest to integrate."

Moral Fervor's mission is to be socially conscious on all levels, said Sack, from the biodegradable products they use in their offices to the mills in Portugal they've selected to produce their clothing, which have their own in-house water purification systems. In many mills, said Sack, the water used in the dyeing process turns black and it's released back into the water supply.

"It's a holistic way of operating business," said Sack.

For their current Spring 2007 line, Moral Fervor used Ingeo fabrics.

It's a cross between a natural and a synthetic fiber, says Ingeo spokesperson Tiziana Tronci. "It breathes, it's hypoallergenic and has the performance of a synthetic fiber, but it comes from nature."

Thus, it's an alternative for clothing manufacturers instead of using petroleum-based synthetic fabrics such as nylon and polyester, which do not originate from a sustainable resource and aren't biodegradable. While it's derived from natural sources, the fact that it is a synthetic makes it versatile, said Tronci.

As far as textiles go, it's been used as denim, wovens, jersey and also more unusual fabrications, such as those found in Elisa Jimenez's designs, where the fabric takes on delicate, paper doily-like qualities, yet has the strength of a traditional woven.

Ingeo is not without its critics, however, namely with those opposed to genetically engineered crops. It was reported by the Associated Press last year that Patagonia, an outdoor clothing company known for its environmental awareness, decided against using the fabric because Ingeo relies, at least partially, on genetically modified corn (known as GMO corn).

But for designers like Jimenez, the pros of using a fiber like Ingeo - its biodegradability, its sustainability – are in keeping with their business philosophy.

"I want to live more conscientiously," said Jimenez. The disposable nature of fashion is an idea Jimenez, also an artist, has incorporated into her designs, so using something like Ingeo as her medium is filled with conceptual significance.

"Where does the stuff go after we've worn it?" Jimenez asked, arguing that if something isn't designed to be kept for a long time, like fashion, then it's better to use materials that are designed to breakdown over time.

"Eco-conscious is the new luxury," she continued. "It costs more to produce, but it has more finesse."

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“Above all, remember that the most important thing you can take anywhere is not a Gucci bag or French-cut jeans; it's an open mind” Gail Rubin Bereny
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06-05-2007
  284
arndom
 
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I saw tshirts in organic cotton in Zara in the whitest, painted vividly with japanese motifs and are ridiculously cheap (around 15 euro I think).

Can organic cotton be white? AA has them in natural colour only. I am just wondering:-)

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06-05-2007
  285
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I believe that organic means the way in which the cotton was grown. It has nothing to do with the treatment of the cotton after it is harvested from the plant. Just because the cotton is organic doesn't mean organic dyes were used in treating the cloth. So yes, organic cotton can be white.

Lots of designers are announcing some kind of organic line, but it remains to be seen just how eco-conscious the products really are. Neither Zara nor its parent company have a particular mission statement about being green.

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Last edited by SomethingElse; 06-05-2007 at 06:45 PM.
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