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07-05-2007
  286
Power to the 99%
 
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^ Don't know if the T you saw was bleached with hydrogen peroxide, but I believe that is the low-impact method (or one of them anyway) Lots of organic cotton products are available in white.

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07-05-2007
  287
arndom
 
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^ thanks, Somethingelse and Fashionista-ta. Indeed I thought that the bleaching should also be eco, too, or at least produced in a low-tech way.

I have no doubts that Zara was just jumping on the new trend:-)

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08-05-2007
  288
rock-chic
 
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Monsoon & Accessorise are members of the Ethical Trading Initiative. They use fair trade cotton, mostly from small farms in India. The Monsoon Accessorise Trust was set up in 1994 to improve the lives of disadvantaged women & children in Asia. Projects include supporting street children, education for women & children and an immunisation programme.
More info on www.monsoon.co.uk under Culture and Commitment

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08-05-2007
  289
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Quote:
Ingeo is not without its critics, however, namely with those opposed to genetically engineered crops. It was reported by the Associated Press last year that Patagonia, an outdoor clothing company known for its environmental awareness, decided against using the fabric because Ingeo relies, at least partially, on genetically modified corn (known as GMO corn).
Forgive my ignorance, but what exactly is wrong with genetically modified crops? Are there harmful chemicals in them, or is it just because they aren't natural?

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16-05-2007
  290
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilaughead View Post
Forgive my ignorance, but what exactly is wrong with genetically modified crops? Are there harmful chemicals in them, or is it just because they aren't natural?
It's not about chemicals, it's because they're not natural. The issue is that Mother Nature has very effective methods for cross-pollinating. Among the things that are being done with GMO crops ... making them infertile so that no one can save seeds & farmers have to buy seeds from Monsanto every year. Potentially this could kill off the fertility of ALL our crops thru cross-pollination. There goes biodiversity. Now all you can plant is Monsanto's brand of whatever. They have also spliced animal genes into plants. They are also using plants to "grow" drugs. The problem is that an open field is an uncontrolled environment, and GMO spreads like wildfire thru pollination. Making sense?

Also, GMO crops appear to be dangerous for unknown reasons. Some sheep got into a GMO cotton field, ate it, and died. No one knows why.

Bottom line, it is very weird s*** that could screw up the whole planet.

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24-05-2007
  291
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Ethical fashion MA and discussion on R4
Quote from fuk.co.uk

23/05/2007

Today Dilys Williams from the London College of Fashion and Katharine Hamnett discussed ethical fashion on Women's Hour. To be honest, I'd forgotten Women's Hour exisited and haven't heard it for gawd knows how long but this item is worth checking out. Dilys is heading up a new MA in Ethical Design at LCF and her stance is very much that designers coming through are making ethics a priority - couldn't agree more Dilys. That is totally my experience - five years ago indie designers looking to make an impact hardly ever mentioned the word 'ethical' and would look dumbstruck when you questioned them about manufacturing work practices etc.. Now I meet designers regularly who tell me that this is the starting point of their business.

Hamnett makes the point that the big players are having to change their ways or risk being "caught with their pants down." Hamnett - who has been campaigning for organic cotton for several years now, thinks that companies have to stop manufacturing in China where trade unions are illegal and that country of origin classifications should be introduced. Although the ETI doesn't preclude members from manufacturing in China, it is I agree bizarre to try and reconcile this with some Chinese work practices. Dilys believes that there are no single answers here - it is fantastic though that soon aspiring designers have an academic course focused on ethical fashion.

Have a listen here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womansho..._21_wed_02.ram

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24-05-2007
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I am wondering why the big names don't use organic cotton, which is also of a very good quality. Is it because of the dyeing problems? Or production? Low quantity, perhaps.

And why jkts cannot be made of organics, too, I can only see tshirts, underwears, skirts and dresses. Ok maybe pants:-) but never jkts or coats. Of hemp, yes, but organic cotton, no.

Fashion is about designing clothes not just source of cotton, but still. Maybe some companies use organic cotton without saying loudly so:-)?

I think young designers who state "ethic" is their most important issue should think twice. It should be design. Ethical should be production.


Last edited by nqth; 24-05-2007 at 08:02 PM.
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26-05-2007
  293
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionista-ta View Post
It's not about chemicals, it's because they're not natural. The issue is that Mother Nature has very effective methods for cross-pollinating. Among the things that are being done with GMO crops ... making them infertile so that no one can save seeds & farmers have to buy seeds from Monsanto every year. Potentially this could kill off the fertility of ALL our crops thru cross-pollination. There goes biodiversity. Now all you can plant is Monsanto's brand of whatever. They have also spliced animal genes into plants. They are also using plants to "grow" drugs. The problem is that an open field is an uncontrolled environment, and GMO spreads like wildfire thru pollination. Making sense?

Also, GMO crops appear to be dangerous for unknown reasons. Some sheep got into a GMO cotton field, ate it, and died. No one knows why.

Bottom line, it is very weird s*** that could screw up the whole planet.
ahhh scary ....

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26-05-2007
  294
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nqth View Post
I am wondering why the big names don't use organic cotton, which is also of a very good quality. Is it because of the dyeing problems? Or production? Low quantity, perhaps.

And why jkts cannot be made of organics, too, I can only see tshirts, underwears, skirts and dresses. Ok maybe pants:-) but never jkts or coats. Of hemp, yes, but organic cotton, no.

Fashion is about designing clothes not just source of cotton, but still. Maybe some companies use organic cotton without saying loudly so:-)?

I think young designers who state "ethic" is their most important issue should think twice. It should be design. Ethical should be production.
well, organic cotton takes time to grow, because it is not growing with harmful pasticise (to kill insects) which damage heath of the cotton farmers, the rate of harvest is smaller than conventional cotton, and the price is higher. From 2002 the amount of organic cotton produced has tripled, but it still far away from reaching the huge demand. Organic cotton production is about less than 1% of the total cotton produced in the world, more and more brands are responsing to this trend and wanting their brand with the title "organic". The problem is organic cotton does not just grow from the ground in 1 day, it takes time..... besides, are people really willing to pay the difference? What if being green becoming "out of the trend", do u still want to spend more money on organic clothing?

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26-05-2007
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Bamboo and hemp and linen and lots of other renewable and sustainable fibres are tops on my list. Here is a though provoking article about bamboo, for example: http://www.theecologist.org/archive_...content_id=919

But the greatest impact we can all make today is to buy locally grown foods. The cost of going from the local farm to the local farmers' market versus shipping food for thousands and thousands of miles - it's kind of a no brainer.

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26-05-2007
  296
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireCa View Post
well, organic cotton takes time to grow, because it is not growing with harmful pasticise (to kill insects) which damage heath of the cotton farmers, the rate of harvest is smaller than conventional cotton, and the price is higher. From 2002 the amount of organic cotton produced has tripled, but it still far away from reaching the huge demand. Organic cotton production is about less than 1% of the total cotton produced in the world, more and more brands are responsing to this trend and wanting their brand with the title "organic". The problem is organic cotton does not just grow from the ground in 1 day, it takes time..... besides, are people really willing to pay the difference? What if being green becoming "out of the trend", do u still want to spend more money on organic clothing?

Well, I know that organic cotton takes time to grow, and I know what means organic, 100% organic, made with organic and made with organic under 70%.

I did some research on it. Since a company like Pantagonia could make their entire cotton items from OC, and it does not cost 100 euros for a tshirt, as any designer tshirt, and a lot of other small companies sell everything from socks to underwear and baby wear from OC cotton, it doesn't seem to me that OC is that expensive and small.

I came accross and article saying that in 1994 or 1996 the cost of producing a pound of OC was1.25 usd, while non OC was 1 usd. 25% pricier, but not like 2 or 3 times.

It is interesting that OC is never used for jkts and coats, that's my point. Maybe it's an issue with textile companies.


Last edited by nqth; 26-05-2007 at 07:38 PM.
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27-05-2007
  297
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nqth View Post
Well, I know that organic cotton takes time to grow, and I know what means organic, 100% organic, made with organic and made with organic under 70%.

I did some research on it. Since a company like Pantagonia could make their entire cotton items from OC, and it does not cost 100 euros for a tshirt, as any designer tshirt, and a lot of other small companies sell everything from socks to underwear and baby wear from OC cotton, it doesn't seem to me that OC is that expensive and small.

I came accross and article saying that in 1994 or 1996 the cost of producing a pound of OC was1.25 usd, while non OC was 1 usd. 25% pricier, but not like 2 or 3 times.

It is interesting that OC is never used for jkts and coats, that's my point. Maybe it's an issue with textile companies.
Thanks for the article! I feel like planting a forest of bamboo in my backyard now!

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28-05-2007
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^ you are welcome:-)

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14-07-2007
  299
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thanks you guys for all the information. really inspirational.

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14-07-2007
  300
fashion insider
 
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From ethical consumer:

Quote:
Ethical Consumer magazine publishes buyer's guides
How ironic.

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