How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Front Row / Fashion... In Depth
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
31-01-2013
  391
.my prison is your brain.
 
HeatherAnne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Gender: femme
Posts: 21,101
I think all of your ideas sound amazing, YoninahAliza. I think it would be cool, if possible, to shadow a bit at each of the ones you mentioned and then wrap it all together. So you'd start with learning how the fabrics are made on the organic farm, then work with an actual business, and show how the process progresses.

Then perhaps talk afterwards talk with a business that doesn't fall into this category (that you would probably keep anonymous) and ask them why they don't go green/fair trade route. After you've learned the ins and outs of how it works, I'm sure you'd have a lot of questions for them.

Let us know what you decide, so many possibilities, should be fun.

__________________

  Reply With Quote
 
31-01-2013
  392
fashion icon
 
YoninahAliza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Avonlea
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionista-ta View Post
for the personal project, you could buy only fair trade/sustainable fashion for the semester ... that would be a nice challenge

i tried buying all organic clothes some years back, and at that time it just wasn't possible if you also wanted to have any aesthetic standards at all--and some items were just missing. i think the selection is much better now.

we have a fashion incubator here--do you have one there?
I love the idea of only buying fair trade/sustainable fashion for the semester but surprisingly, I must admit, I don't shop a ton and where I am located now doesn't even have a shopping mall so I won't be feeling much temptation to shop. Though, if I were to do that, I'm already on my way, the first shopping I've done in ages was on People Tree's website.

I was actually just talking with my roommate about this, how so much organic/fair trade stuff can make a person look granola, if you know what I mean. But I think the sustainable/fair trade fashions have changed a lot in recent years (as this thread has shown) and it's more feasible to buy and support these designers and to look stylish while doing so.

Also, I've never herd of a fashion incubator, could you tell me what it is? Thanks.

__________________
http://miss-rumphius.tumblr.com/ "It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable." Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  Reply With Quote
31-01-2013
  393
fashion icon
 
YoninahAliza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Avonlea
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeatherAnne View Post
I think all of your ideas sound amazing, YoninahAliza. I think it would be cool, if possible, to shadow a bit at each of the ones you mentioned and then wrap it all together. So you'd start with learning how the fabrics are made on the organic farm, then work with an actual business, and show how the process progresses.

Then perhaps talk afterwards talk with a business that doesn't fall into this category (that you would probably keep anonymous) and ask them why they don't go green/fair trade route. After you've learned the ins and outs of how it works, I'm sure you'd have a lot of questions for them.

Let us know what you decide, so many possibilities, should be fun.
Sorry for the double post but I just had to respond to both of your suggestions! I really like the idea of combining both of these projects, like you suggested, it sounds like it could be a fascinating look at both sides of the business- the "before" and "after" if you want to call it that. I'll have to talk to my professor about this but I think it sounds like a project that not only I'd love but learn so much from. Thank you both for your input, it's definitely given me some great things to think about.

__________________
http://miss-rumphius.tumblr.com/ "It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable." Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  Reply With Quote
31-01-2013
  394
Power to the 99%
 
fashionista-ta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hardly ever at Barney's
Gender: femme
Posts: 13,732
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoninahAliza View Post
I love the idea of only buying fair trade/sustainable fashion for the semester but surprisingly, I must admit, I don't shop a ton and where I am located now doesn't even have a shopping mall so I won't be feeling much temptation to shop. Though, if I were to do that, I'm already on my way, the first shopping I've done in ages was on People Tree's website.

I was actually just talking with my roommate about this, how so much organic/fair trade stuff can make a person look granola, if you know what I mean. But I think the sustainable/fair trade fashions have changed a lot in recent years (as this thread has shown) and it's more feasible to buy and support these designers and to look stylish while doing so.

Also, I've never herd of a fashion incubator, could you tell me what it is? Thanks.
yes, i call it the earth mother look it is not for me. i will not be wearing anything decorated with a kokopelli in this lifetime--not while i am of sound mind.

it's an organization that helps people who are starting fashion businesses. i think the one here has a shop where everyone can sell their stuff.

i guess you could also put together a virtual wardrobe--you wouldn't have to buy all of it. just show how it could be done. i would be very interested in seeing that ...

__________________
There's a need for more individuality today, and my job is to cater to women, not dictate to them.
--Alber Elbaz

Last edited by fashionista-ta; 31-01-2013 at 10:52 PM.
  Reply With Quote
01-02-2013
  395
rising star
 
ssgghh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 130
I think thats a market gap there. Fairtrade that isnt bland/granola/mother earthy but a bit more avantgarde and dare I say cool

  Reply With Quote
05-02-2013
  396
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 39
Really interesting to read this thread and see the various developments that have been happening for ethical and fair trade fashion over the years. I write for a fashion blog and some other publications focusing on ethical and sustainable fashion and I think there is so much going on with ethical/ sustainable fashion at the moment.

Here are just a few of the recent developments in ethical / sustainable fashion that are going on at the moment. This is mainly from a UK perspective, so would be really interesting to hear from people based in the US, Europe and Australia about developments there as I am pretty sure there is plenty going on!

There has been plenty of talk about the use of forced child labour for harvesting cotton in Uzbekistan. Despite lobbying by various campaigning groups, it still continues to happen. Some brands/ retailers have committed not to use cotton from Uzbekistan, but many high street stores do continue to use it http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2...kistan-fashion

In Bangladesh their has recently been a number of tragedies in garment factory fires which has highlighted the poor and dangerous working conditions faced by many. Hopefully things are beginning to change as brands and goverment put pressure factories http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/ba...ctories-324254

Greenpeace have had great success with their Detox fashion campaign.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxFWo4sCzCs So far Nike, Adidas, Puma, H&M, M&S, C&A, Li-Ning, Zara, Mango, Esprit, Levi's, Uniqlo, Benetton and Victoria's Secret have committed to clean up. There are still a some more big brands still to sign up to the manifesto.

There has also been many new innovations in ethical and sustainable fashion recently including:

A new search engine for sustainable style to make it quicker and easier to find ethical fashion from over 100 brands including fair trade, organic, vegan and recycled fashion http://www.style-is.co.uk

Some exciting new retailers, offering even more choice check out http://Modavanti.com

The Ethical Fashion Forum (http://www.ethicalfashionforum.com) also recently held its brand preview which showcased many brands including designer, clothing, shoes and accessories and was attended by some major retailers.
The Estethica exhibition at London Fashion week (now in its 7th year) will soon open showing even more ethical fashion brands.
Ecoluxe (http://www.ecoluxe.com) will take place in 17th - 18th showcasing luxury eco brands.

You can check out any of the above websites if you want to find out more about some great ethical/ sustainable fashion brands - certainly nothing like granola!

__________________
Ceri
Style Eyes Ethical Fashion Blog
  Reply With Quote
05-02-2013
  397
fashion icon
 
YoninahAliza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Avonlea
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,406
Style Eyes, what a fantastic list of resources! Thank you for sharing, I can't wait to check them all out.

Also a little update about the school project I mentioned a little further up in the thread. I shared the idea's which ya'll suggested and my professor was so stoked! For the 'Personal Project' side to it, I will also be going through my wardrobe; looking at each individual tags to see not only where they were made, but what materials they are made from (if they create toxic waste, etc.), and if they have any sustainable or fair trade labels. I'm so excited for this part, but also secretly horrified because I just know that a lot of the brands that I have in my closet aren't always on the "good list." But I'm interested in seeing how this changes my buying habits (I like to think just being a little more conscious of it already has changed my shopping habits a bit).

My professor is also looking into having me work with a sheep or alpaca farm too, like I mentioned above as well. And I still plan on interviewing my local fair trade business. Apparently we'll also have to share our projects at the end of the semester at the "college day," where students and faculty share information about what they've learned this year. Which makes me a bit nervous but I think it'll be a good experience to have. So glad everything seems to be working out just the way I was hoping it would! Thank you so much for your support and suggestions it's really helped me out a bunch!

__________________
http://miss-rumphius.tumblr.com/ "It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable." Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  Reply With Quote
05-02-2013
  398
V.I.P.
 
lucy92's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,245
YoninahAliza, one thing you might want to check for is if you have a garment from H&M...unfortunately, they refuse to stop using hazardous chemicals in their clothing production until 2020.

check out Greenpeace International’s investigation report, “Toxic Threads – The Big Fashion Stitch-Up,”

__________________
Large Avatars for Everyone!
  Reply With Quote
06-02-2013
  399
fashion icon
 
YoninahAliza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Avonlea
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,406
^Thank you lucy92 for sharing that link and info. I do, unfortunately have several items from H&M. I'd also like to look into the "organic" line of clothing they have, to find out if it's really true or not. A label like that can get thrown around a lot, without it really being true (like if they use organic cotton but then continue to use toxic chemicals on it). I've started reading the Greenpeace report, there is some really interesting and shocking findings, I'll definitely be citing the report in my project.

__________________
http://miss-rumphius.tumblr.com/ "It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable." Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  Reply With Quote
13-02-2013
  400
Power to the 99%
 
fashionista-ta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hardly ever at Barney's
Gender: femme
Posts: 13,732
from o magazine:

Quote:
... SoleRebels is the world's first fair-trade certified footwear company. its 300-plus factory workers, many of whom had been unemployed for years before being hired, earn around 3x the avg industrial wage in ethiopia & receive comprehensive medical coverage for their families. they showcase their textile craftsmanship using good-for-the-planet materials like organic cotton, local fibers, & rubber repurposed from worn-out tires.

__________________
There's a need for more individuality today, and my job is to cater to women, not dictate to them.
--Alber Elbaz
  Reply With Quote
08-03-2013
  401
front row
 
EvaH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 316
Great ressources ta-ta and everyone else I will check the SoleRebels. Generally I try to always spend time at local markets while travelling. Now I am trying to stay connected and find more "global" endeavours.

On another note, I have started to make purchases with Muzungu sisters. I was lucky enough to discover them through a friend and went to their pop up sale in London last year. Has anyone hear about it?

My style doesn't really fit the brand but I was able to get some really nice jewellery so I will keep checking it.

Quote:
Dana and Tatiana created the revolutionary concept of providing the global online retail market with exclusive products handcrafted by local artisans from diverse cultures. In promoting the products featured on Muzungu Sisters, Dana and Tatiana hope to shine a light on the rare artistry found in various communities, and to stimulate those local economies, all while providing customers with timeless, hand-selected items of impeccable quality and style

__________________
Success isn't about how your life looks to others, it's about how it feels to you. - Michelle Obama

Last edited by EvaH; 08-03-2013 at 06:22 PM.
  Reply With Quote
09-03-2013
  402
rising star
 
ssgghh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: London
Gender: femme
Posts: 130
There was a Muzungu fair trade café in Zagreb. Not sure if they still exist, but they sold jewlery and stuff like that. I wasn´t really feeling the jewlery, but its a nice initiative.

  Reply With Quote
09-03-2013
  403
fashion icon
 
YoninahAliza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Avonlea
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,406
Oh very cool, I hadn't herd of Muzugu, it seems like a nice company though! Also, I was on Yoox today and stumbled upon their eco-commerce part of the website, Yooxygen, which I hadn't realized before they had. I was actually quite impressed with the variety of brands they carried and the range in prices too. Maybe it's just ignorance speaking here, but is anyone else aware of other "big name" websites that have a section devoted to 'eco' clothing? It was the first time I'd really come across something like this.

__________________
http://miss-rumphius.tumblr.com/ "It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable." Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  Reply With Quote
14-03-2013
  404
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: UK
Gender: femme
Posts: 39
Yes Yooxygen is amazing. ASOS also have the Green Rooms although I am not completely sure that everything featured in there is completely ethical/ sustainable so it is well worth checking out the different brands individually. Zalando also have a good seelction of Eco brands but they don't have an actual eco section so you kind of need to know what you are looking for to start with. If you want an easier way of finding eco clothing style-is.co.uk has clothes from lots (probably at least 100) eco brands.

__________________
Ceri
Style Eyes Ethical Fashion Blog
  Reply With Quote
02-04-2013
  405
V.I.P.
 
lucy92's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 12,245
A documentary revealing the miserable conditions faced by Cambodian factory workers producing goods for the fashion retailer H&M was aired on Swedish national television last night. Campaigners and the media are calling on H&M to respond to allegations of poverty pay in the industry.
“The documentary revealed the reality behind the glamorous veneer of fast, cheap fashion sold in H&M stores,” said Klaus Melvin Jensen, Coordinator for Clean Clothes Campaign Denmark. “I fear many of H&M’s customers will lose their appetite for cheap clothing after seeing this film.”
In recent months H&M have held a number of high profile meetings with dignitaries such as the Vice Prime-Minister of Cambodia, and officials from the wage board of Cambodia to call for a higher minimum wage to be implemented for workers. Yet campaigners say that meetings and good intentions are not a sufficient response to the pressing health risks and poverty conditions faced by factory workers.
“Low wages come at a high cost. Last year, over 2400 workers passed out in Cambodian factories due to malnutrition as a direct consequence of low salaries. But H&M, one of Cambodia's main buyers, continues to refuse to pay a living wage to its workers,” says Jeroen Merk of the International Clean Clothes Campaign. “This is unacceptable.”
The Clean Clothes Campaign Network in collaboration with the Cambodian trade union C.CAWDU launched in September a European-wide campaign called 'No more Excuses', demanding that the company take a proactive role in paying a wage that allows its workers to live with dignity. The campaign aims to draw attention to the fact that whereas the minimum wage for garment workers is USD 61 a month this amounts to less than 25% of a living wage in Cambodia.
In an attempt to respond to the documentary's findings, H&M announced plans on Tuesday for a project to strengthen union – management dialogue at some production units in Cambodia. Campaigners and unionists have welcomed this step, but have expressed concern that it offers no guarantee of living wages for workers who need them most.
“We support the idea of building a respectful dialogue between the trade unions and the employers in Cambodia,” says Athit Kong, Vice President of the Coalition of Cambodian Apparel Workers' Democratic Union (C.CAWDU), “but H&M must also play its part. It is absolutely necessary that any project includes trade unions at the local and the nation level and really reflects the worker’s voices. This is the only way to achieve visible changes on a grassroots level. We call upon our Swedish union friends to make sure H&M is brought to the table to negotiate a real agreement with Cambodian and international unions that will improve the conditions for the Cambodian workers”

Clean Clothes Campaign activists are calling on H&M and other garment buyers from Cambodia to take immediate action to address the poverty caused by the low wages in Cambodia. They are asking H&M to support the Cambodian trade union's 131 USD minimum wage goal by issuing a public statement of support and engaging in building an action plan for paying this figure with suppliers. To ensure long term results on the ground and guarantee considerably higher wages for the garment workers, H&M needs to adopt an action plan for its whole supplier base with a clear benchmark for a living wage, a timeline, and a follow up procedure for delivering this at a factory level.

You can see the documentary (with English subtitles) here:
http://www.tv4play.se/program/kalla-...deo_id=2232717


cleanclothescampaign

__________________
Large Avatars for Everyone!
  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
brands, clothing, consumer, ethical, fair, human, movement, rights, trade
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:31 AM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.