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27-07-2010
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it'd be great for fashion if there were some outsiders coming in
no more overeducated students from central saint martins who have memorised the archives on catwalking.com
give some wacky architect a creative director position and get him a good team at some defunct label to wake up this ugly beast called fashion.

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28-07-2010
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^Completely agree....bring in some people with an art focus. But obviously people who love fashion as well - but have a deep understanding of art.

I'm wondering how everyone became so generic...

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28-07-2010
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These weren't post. But I guess they are accurate to this thread ...

The Future Of Fashion - style.com

As we enter a new decade, the fashion business, like the rest of the world, is encountering significant economic and technological changes. In this new series, Style.com’s editor in chief, Dirk Standen, talks to a number of leading industry figures about the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

Robert DUFFY
Cathy HORYN
Hedi SLIMANE
Olivier ZAHM
Julie GILHART
Alber ELBAZ

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29-07-2010
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This is very interesting thread and something I often spend a great deal of time thinking about.

There was an article published shortly before the death of Lee McQueen, whereby Cathy Horyn of the New York Times discussed with him where he could see fashion going. You can google 'future of fashion' and get many farfetched and out-there responses that hint at the possibilities of the future, but it was his response that put a reality to what is really capable.

"It could be said that McQueen is an incurable romantic. His clothes, after all, frequently make reference to the 18th and 19th centuries. When he tries to do something futuristic — clothes with winged shoulders, say, or the illusion of morphing — journalists slap him down. I remind him that he had once told me he wanted to be as revolutionary as his hero Kawakubo. He wanted to be known as a 21st-century designer. He nods. “Five years ago, designers like myself would look at Rei and pay homage,” he says. “Today we’re thinking faster than Rei. You have no choice.”

The truth is that McQueen tends to think in three dimensions. That’s partly because, unlike many of his contemporaries, he actually knows how to cut fabric. But it’s also because he wants to push the physical limits of fashion. This desire was never more evident than with a 2006 show that ended with a hologram of his friend Kate Moss. Filmed with four cameras and shown within a huge pyramid, the images of Moss looked amazingly lifelike. McQueen says that he was intrigued by the thought of people being able to view an entire show within a little pyramid mounted on their desks. “And I’d just send it to you over the internet,” he says with a giggle. “I’m talking fantasy, but I don’t think it’s that far from reality. Five years.”

His latest obsession is to do a live stream of a show over the web, while offering a handful of commercial looks for immediate sale. In his view, digital technology allows designers to move away from the narrative form and, inevitably, the runway itself. Or, as he puts it: “You can’t keep rehashing the same concepts of the good, the bad and the ugly.”

McQueen may just be winding me up. At one point, discussing the 15 minutes of transcendent joy that a show gives, he says: “God, I sound like I’m contradicting myself, but that’s me all over.” Still, he knows that for farsighted designers such as himself, the real hurdle to progress isn’t money or balky corporate honchos. It is creating a fabric that can produce a new, 21st-century silhouette.

Before us are some prototypes that, magically, appear to do just that: swirls of fabric suddenly blurring into a carapace. McQueen, though, isn’t satisfied: “Yeah, but what’s in my head isn’t feasible at this time. I’m trying to weave a fabric that goes from a structure into a chiffon, but the loom doesn’t exist. We’re all thinking about it.”

Never have I been so fascinated by so few paragraphs. The possibilities are truly endless. When I studied at Saint Martins, I spent six months of my course working towards our final project which for me explored this exact concept. I was fascinated by the east end of London and the nightclub boombox, and how in particular the aesthetics of this movement spearheaded by Henry Hollands slogan tees, Gareth Pughs abstract designs, the kitsune music label, and figures such as Richard Mortimer and Matthew Stone. Whether you liked it or not it was utterly modern because the ideas of these people reflected a contemporary moment in time. By that I mean that the opinions, attitudes, and philosophies of these people were all provoked by the actions and movements of the generation before it, and thus no moment in time ever remains the same. In turn this mind set manifests itself in the visual culture that becomes a direct reflection of our time. I wanted to explore how I could take that further and took the simplicity of the slogan t-shirt and using a ridiculous amount of LED light bulbs created a vest top with a simple design created with the bulbs to directly show how you take the ideas of others and with your own mindset - make it modern.

I digress somewhat because my main point really stems from this mix of cultural zeigeist and breakthroughs in technology as illustrated in the conversation between Horyn and McQueen. You have designers on two levels - those who romance with life and culture and then those intrigued by the factuality of technology and the new visual aesthetics it brings. McQueen sadly was both which makes his death just a little more bitter for those who loved his work and those who could comprehend from this article alone some of the feats he may have gone on to achieve.

Essentially I think what I'm trying to say is that modernity can never be predicted. There is no formula to it, yet paradoxically is perhaps one of the most formulaic things that exists. Through a raft of random, complex and incoherent actions modernity is achieved by the reactions of those who live their life through visual expression.

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29-07-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by runner View Post
maybe the fragments of the future are everywhere, but it takes some time for them to be incarnated as the future.
they are waiting for their complement to come. so some of them can be looking even like old things already.
or they may first appear as expensive useless stuff without being recognized as the future, just like some of CCP inventions do. but curiosity and sacrifices are necessary so that the future can start and develop.
also it can come from a sheer personal viewpoint. so the universality of it cannot be noticed soon.
the last time a designer named maurizio altieri very quietly presented his collection which partly dealt with the
future, the buyers did not order anything from the future line. the work is yet to see the light of the day.
that's usually the way we advance. we hardly leap.
hmm...yes---
i see what you mean...
it's like having some items in my closet for a long time that never get worn and are no longer 'new'..
until one day i find something that is just the perfect complement to that item and then it is suddenly the most perfect thing in the world...

i suppose there are elements of the future in the air right now...
the challenge is to find the right way of putting them together to create that 'perfect' new thing...

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29-07-2010
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i think everyone should read that article that missmagaddict posted...
...

so good...
real industry professionals speaking their minds and not pussyfooting around...
very very cool...

thanks for posting mma!



'fashion is hard work and not a lot of money'...
too true...
*sigh*..


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15-11-2010
  112
etre soi-meme
 
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could the future of (mainstream) fashion be somehow shaped by Tom Ford's hush hush/intimate/exclusive-to-clients womanswear launch strategy?

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16-11-2010
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^ Yep in a keep it hush-hush and exclusive when he had to compete with dozens of other designers and then break it out during the November and December doldrums so that he can sell a whole lotta perfume and lipstick during the holidays kinda way.

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18-11-2010
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I think having people trained in architecture, fine arts, literature... or other forms of creative faculties before joining the fashion industry may help to diversify the skills set involved in fashion training.

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19-01-2011
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3D printed clothes.

http://www.boingboing.net/2010/07/29...=Google+Reader

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19-01-2011
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AWESOME. That would be soooo cool. And fabulous. No more tailoring.

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02-02-2011
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The "invisibilty cloak"



youtube.com
posted by kingofthedemons


I actually think there's some potential for the use of this technology in fashion design(once it becomes cost effective); if nothing else, it would re-emphasize the need to create original cuts, since a designer couldn't rely on color and patterns.

Of course, if everyone wore this while clubbing, there'd be a lot of injuries on the dance floor.

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05-03-2011
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Fashion hasn't changed too much in the last few thousand years (Cleopatra could be a fashion diva even today) so I don't expect too much of exciting changes in the short-term future but...

...what if we could possibly fast forward 10,000 years from now? How different fashion is going to look like? What will people wear? Will fashion bloggers still be around?

I'd like to think that folks will be using just one piece of clothe, with no fashion whatsoever, like permanent uniforms, wearing auto-generated, self-sustainable garments made of our own discards (yay!), items of clothes interacting with our emotions and brains, making us feel and look great at all times.

In the meantime we will see a lots of experiments coming from scientists and creatives (not only designers) playing together with the latest technologies, struggling with religion and ethics, creating for most of the time unwearable and/or expensive stuff rather than desirable clothes.

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08-03-2011
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IMO the whole Tom Ford exclusivity crap is crap, but I do think that he is onto something when it comes to the fashion calendar. I don't think that the retailers and the editors need the same amount of lead time to present clothes from a collection and therefore obviating the need to present your spring / summer clothes in September.

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08-03-2011
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I actually like the fact that they launch spring/summer in september and fall/winter in feb/march

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