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25-03-2015
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Generation Z v Millennials/Gen X
How do you feel about magazines bombarding us with teenagers these days?

I wonder: do they buy High Fashion magazines when the new "It Girls" like Kylie Jenner appear on them? nowadays that almost everything is in digital format for free, do they spend money on mags?

Can they afford to buy HF clothes/accessories? even if their parents are buying them, will they continue to buy them when they´re older and have to pay for them themselves? (it´s easier to like a Celine bag when it´s for free)
meaning, is it worth it for magazines to try to influence them for the years to come but alienating their main demographic (Gen X and Millennials) in the process?

A little discussion in i-D Spring 2015 thread, which prompt me to start this thread:

http://forums.thefashionspot.com/sho...1&postcount=18

http://forums.thefashionspot.com/sho...5&postcount=25

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Last edited by kokobombon; 25-03-2015 at 01:25 PM.
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25-03-2015
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As a teenager, I can say that I buy a lot of magazines but at the same time I can't stand that whole fake fame based on likes on instagram or facebook so I wouldn't buy anything with any Jenner on the cover, just because I quite hate them. But I don't buy High Fashion clothes or accessories, they're too expensive and I wouldn't feel comfortable enough, I couldn't mix them in the same way as I do it with my cheaper pieces so at this point I don't think that teenagers are the best target for HF mags. And in my opinion teenagers should discover their own style. I mean their OWN, because now they look like clones and magazines would make it even more obvious.

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25-03-2015
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There have always been teenagers in high fashion e.g. Twiggy (60s); Brooke Shields (80s) & Kate Moss (90s). They were amazingly talented & are still thought of as icons of the fashion industry today.
The issue I have today is that reality tv is the lowest common denominator of entertainment but it appears to be ridiculously popular which gives it legitimate status higher then it actually deserves.
I love fashion so it is very disheartening that fashion today is bombarded with too many people who don't inspire me anymore. It is boring & tedious.

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25-03-2015
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There are and have been some great teenage fashion icons, but the ones that we get bombarded with now really have no merit and are...trashy. Dakota Fanning was a very fashionable teenager, and more actresses similar to her are equally known for their fashion sense. But what we're getting now are the likes of Kendall and Kylie Jenner, who don't seem too interested in fashion and have no place in it. They don't even seem like interesting people. Also, I doubt most teenagers care about high fashion even if they are rich, there probably aren't that many Blair Waldorf fashionistas out there.

I admit though I got interested in high fashion at age 12-13, and was glued to the computer looking at pics of Chanel and Dior couture, but I never met anyone else who liked that stuff(well maybe one I think, she liked Armani) of any age. I've met people who liked clothes and/or designer labels but never took fashion seriously or critically

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26-03-2015
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Well, I'm not a teenager any more so I don't get the appeal of these teen-insta stars, but I understand why the younger demographics worships them...
I guess this was inevitable with the rising of facebook/instagram/twitter

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26-03-2015
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^inevitable, yes. But do you think that publications aimed to older woman like Vogue should featured them or any really young looking models?
Look at Celine ads this season, isnt it aimed at older women yet Freya looks like a 12 yo... is that because privileged kids are obsessed with the bags?

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26-03-2015
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It's nice to hear opinions from younger members. I must agree with Kelles though that fashion has always been obsessed with youth, so this obsession isn't exactly a new phenomenon. It has been the state of affairs for the past, I dunno, 40 years or more. How do you think older women reacted when Twiggy came onto the scene with her childlike and unattainable physique? Or all those heroin chic girls which dominated the campaigns and magazines? The industry is filled with as much teenagers as it was ten years ago. There's too much awareness, even the Vogue editors pledged to not shoot underage models.

I think if we look at the type of people magazines feature nowadays, and the aesthetic they're aiming for, it's clear that they're looking to court younger readers. That to me makes sense to some extent because they're familiarizing the brand with the consumer. True, Gen Z might not make an immediate sales impact, but today's teenager is tomorrow's luxury consumer.

Personally I feel there's not much difference between Millennials and Gen Z. They both fixate on all things digital, which is the only way to attract their attention. Marketers will have a harder time with Millennials though. This is a generation which lived through a recession and are way more cautious when making big purchases.

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26-03-2015
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I guess, being from an older generation (lets call it Gen W)... I didnt quite live the whole fast fashion when I was younger. We had The Gap and Banana Republic and such.
Even high fashion wasnt like crazy prized high fashion (Helmut Lang jeans were $100-$200).
Recently a magazine did a note on fashion people and something I noted was that the younger the person, the more fast fashion you see incorporated into the wardrobe. The older, the more "investment pieces".

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27-03-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokobombon View Post
^inevitable, yes. But do you think that publications aimed to older woman like Vogue should featured them or any really young looking models?
Look at Celine ads this season, isnt it aimed at older women yet Freya looks like a 12 yo... is that because privileged kids are obsessed with the bags?
I think there should be some kind of balance... I don't know, I don't think younger models should be so heavily included...
But then again, new money people are on the rise, there is a influx of young rich people and fashion houses are trying to sell THEM their products in any way possible, and that primarly means relating to them...

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27-03-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thecpatient View Post
I think there should be some kind of balance... I don't know, I don't think younger models should be so heavily included...
But then again, new money people are on the rise, there is a influx of young rich people and fashion houses are trying to sell THEM their products in any way possible, and that primarly means relating to them...
I read somewhere that the technology millionaires/billionaires are apparently not interested much in fashion, which is a problem to the fashion industry because these are supposed to be the new customers replacing the old ones and that's not happening. Apparently the likes of Mark Zuckerberg aren't interested in high priced clothing.

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27-03-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squilliam View Post
I read somewhere that the technology millionaires/billionaires are apparently not interested much in fashion, which is a problem to the fashion industry because these are supposed to be the new customers replacing the old ones and that's not happening. Apparently the likes of Mark Zuckerberg aren't interested in high priced clothing.
Maybe the high-visibility American tech million/billionaires are not interested in fashion, but there are lots of wealthy tech people whose names you don't see in the media, but whom you do see in Barneys or high-end boutiques and out on the town wearing thousands of dollars worth of fashunz. They are often people who recently made their money in tech and came from humble origins. So I am not offering the fashion industry a tissue just yet, they can wipe their eyes on their laser-cut leather sleeves.

I agree with everyone who has said that fixation on youth is not a new phenomenon in fashion. I also find the labels/demarcations amusing. We all start out young and get older™.

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27-03-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squilliam View Post
I read somewhere that the technology millionaires/billionaires are apparently not interested much in fashion, which is a problem to the fashion industry because these are supposed to be the new customers replacing the old ones and that's not happening. Apparently the likes of Mark Zuckerberg aren't interested in high priced clothing.
Well, maybe Mark isn't interested... but what about his wife?

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30-03-2015
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Quote:
Fashion’s Two-Faced Relationship With Age

By VANESSA FRIEDMANJAN. 7, 2015

For the last three years at about this time — which is to say, in the nascent days of the new year, when the calendar lies clear and the sense of possibility is at its apex — Selfridges, the British department store, has dedicated its windows, all 13 of them, to a new class of Bright Young Things: dozens of up-and-coming stars of fashion and art, including names like Simone Rocha, Christopher Shannon and Maarten van der Horst, who it thinks will shape what we wear and how we shop in the year to come.

New year, new generation!

But this year, things look a bit different. On Thursday, the emporium will unveil its first windows of 2015, all dedicated to the work of Bright Old Things (BOTs): 14 men and women of a certain age, who changed careers late in life, moving into the worlds of fashion and art at a time most people start thinking about saying goodbye to fashionable things.

“It’s traditional at this time of year to focus on what’s new and what’s next,” Linda Hewson, Selfridges’ creative director and the woman behind the project, said when I called to discuss the initiative. “We decided to turn that on its head.”
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Julia Roberts, 47, is part of the latest Givenchy ad campaign. Credit Givenchy

The young are so — well, old hat. Or so it increasingly seems.

Selfridges, after all, is simply the latest member of a movement arguably commenced in 2010 by the photographer Ari Seth Cohen and his “Advanced Style” blog/book/documentary series, which was quickly followed by the 2013 British documentary “Fabulous Fashionistas,” featuring the happening wardrobes of six women with an average age of 80; the elevation of the nonagenarian Iris Apfel to icon status (she was most recently the subject of a documentary by Albert Maysles); and a river of beauty- and fashion-ad campaigns featuring “older” women: Charlotte Rampling (68), Helen Mirren (69), Diane Keaton (69) and (this week) Joan Didion (80).

Even the 47-year-old Julia Roberts is currently the face of Givenchy, and three unnamed grandmas star in Dolce & Gabbana’s new ads.

Oiled by the “longevity revolution,” so named by a 2014 Bank of America Merrill Lynch report on the “silver economy,” which found that the average wealth of 50-plus households in the United States is $765,000; the average for 50-plus households in Britain is £541,000 (about $690,000), and it’s £723,000 for ages 60 to 64. Add the shrinking spending power of the employment-challenged younger generation, and fashion’s sudden embrace is shaping up to be a bona fide trend.

But while it’s one thing to pay lip (and advertising) service to the importance of the mature market, it’s another thing entirely to design for it. And the truth is, catwalks are still speckled by short skirts and skinny trousers, the sheer and the sleeveless.
Continue reading the main story

“Here’s my motto,” said Sue Kreitzman, 75, one of the Selfridges BOTs (and a former cookbook writer and TV personality, now an artist): “Don’t wear beige — it might kill you.” She was referring to the lack of choice for older women when it comes to fashion. She has her clothes made for her, customized by artist friends.

I remember sitting at a Bottega Veneta show a few seasons ago, watching a parade of pencil skirts and peplum sweaters, and trying to figure out why they looked so different — and then realizing it was because if I were a child, this is exactly how I would want my mother to look: elegant, streamlined, not old but grown-up. It was a surprising idea (not that such garments would be made, but that they would show up on a runway).

Which speaks to a reality that the Selfridges project exposes for all to see: the fashion world’s contradictory relationship with the concept of age.
Photo
Dolce & Gabbana’s spring 2015 ads feature three grandmothers. Credit Dolce & Gabbana

Because here’s the thing: The BOTs range in age from women like Molly Parker, 82 (a fashion writer turned painter), to Sand Laurenson (a policewoman turned artist), who is in her 40s, which, speaking as someone in her 40s, does not seem that old. Middle-aged, sure. But old?

Well, Ms. Hewson said, somewhat uncomfortably, “We really removed age from the equation.”

Huh?

“We decided age was irrelevant — what mattered was the career change,” she said. The title was just a hook to keep things consistent.

The cynical response would be “only in the fashion world,” where the downward slope of aging occurs somewhere around 27, and the message is often a perversion of Keats’s “beauty is truth” lines from “Ode on a Grecian Urn”: “Beauty is youth, youth beauty; that is all ye know on earth and all ye need to know.”

Except it’s not, because you should also know that the fashion world is largely run by older people, from designers like Karl Lagerfeld and Giorgio Armani, each in his early 80s, Ralph Lauren (75) and Donna Karan (66) to the editors Anna Wintour, Carine Roitfeld and Franca Sozzani, all in their 60s.

Indeed, that world is so heavily tilted to the older generation that designers like the 36-year-olds Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler are generally known as “the boys,” and the Milanese team Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi of Aquilano.Rimondi, in their mid-40s, are universally referred to as “young designers.”

Here’s the disconnect: On the one hand, fashion pays endless aesthetic homage to youth; on the other, it remains firmly in the thrall, and power, of the mature. Even for an industry that has made something of an art form out of holding contradictory ideas at the same time (loving both pelts and pets, for example; showing spring/summer in autumn/winter), this is hard to reconcile.
Photo
Sue Kreitzman, 75, can be seen in the windows of Selfridges. Credit Todd Selby
Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main story

Is it sheer hypocrisy? A terrible case of the Dorian Grays?

Part of the problem may be that for years, from its birth in the late 19th century under Charles Frederick Worth, a.k.a. “the father of couture,” high fashion was largely the province of the grown-up. It catered to women who could afford it, which implied a certain stage in life had been reached.

Post-1960s, Saint Laurent and the rise of ready-to-wear and street style, all that changed. Suddenly the old names on the label had to focus on the new ones. And thus it has been ever since, forcing fashion world denizens of today, who are not oblivious to the issue, to jump through some interesting hoops.

“As it relates to fashion as a whole, I think the concept of ‘young’ points to being relevant and adaptable, excited about newness,” the 31-year-old designer Joseph Altuzarra said by email. “And having fun. And I think in a way that is more a frame of mind than an age thing.”

The designer Erdem Moralioglu (in his late 30s), agreed. “Young can be a 70-year-old with a cheeky smile; old can be a 21-year-old who is tired with a smirk,” he said. “It’s all relative.”

But I’m not entirely convinced. After all, at a certain point in life there is nothing relative about melting triceps — they are an incontrovertible fact — or a thickened middle or, dare I say it, back fat. They need to be taken into account.

If there really is a new market class of 60- and 70- and 80-year-olds with disposable incomes and minds of their own, perhaps it’s time that fashion, and designers, grappled with their needs.

Some of them are beginning to. You can see it in Mr. Altuzarra’s gingham suiting; the Christian Dior frock coats (admittedly, the latter were worn over board shorts, but still). “I think it’s changing,” Ms. Kreitzman said. “It’s necessary.”

You can’t have your consumers and not cater to them, too. I, for one, am old enough to know that.
Source: www.nytimes.com

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30-03-2015
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Quote:
Generation Z Is A Complete Nightmare For Retailers

Hayley Peterson

Jun. 27, 2014, 11:53 AM

The youngest generation of consumers, Generation Z, are traditional retail's worst nightmare.

Loosely qualified as anyone born after 1990, most of them are still too young to have their own income. But they have significant control over household purchases, such as toys, groceries, and clothing, according to a study by Sparks & Honey, a New York-based marketing firm. They also have an average allowance of nearly $70 a month, which translates to $44 billion a year, the study found.

But unlike generations that have preceded them, they lack brand loyalty.

"The products themselves are more important to Generation Z than the brands that produce them, and these consumers will change brands easily in search of higher quality," according to Arkansas-based marketing agency Martin-Wilbourne Partners.

When millennials were teens, they were spending the majority of their budgets on clothing, according to Piper Jaffray's semi-annual survey on teen spending.

Members of Generation Z, on the other hand, spend most of their money on food and beverages, Piper Jaffray's most recent survey found. Starbucks is their favorite restaurant brand, followed by McDonald's, Chipotle, Olive Garden, and Taco Bell.

This shift in spending has contributed to the downfall of shopping malls, which were once considered prime destinations for teen meetups. Mall traffic among teenagers has declined 30% over the past decade, according to the Piper Jaffray survey. American teens visited malls an average of 29 times in 2014, compared to 38 times in 2007.

The trend has spelled disaster for many mall-based teen brands, such as Abercrombie & Fitch, Aeropostale, and American Eagle, which are all experiencing sales declines.

To make things even more difficult, today's teens are making it harder for retailers to track their activity online.

"As social media natives attuned to NSA surveillance issues, they are more concerned about disabling their phone's geolocation than their privacy settings," according to the Sparks & Honey report. "Gen Z are drawn to incognito media such as Snapchat, Secret and Whisper."

To reach the youngest generation of consumers, companies must engage them across multiple social media platforms and never attempt to stifle conversation about their products, according to Kathy Savitt, the founder and CEO of Lockerz, a Seattle-based social commerce site.

"Companies that expect Generation Z to be loyal based on a carefully crafted brand image and marketing message will find that their effort is wasted," Savitt writes in an editorial published by Mashable. "Generation Z simply doesn’t buy it. Instead, the product itself is what’s important, regardless of marketing campaigns."

"What does Generation Z care about?" she writes. "Finding and sharing the best stuff in the world. They aren’t just consumers, they are curators... As a result, marketers need to make it easy to share what their Gen Z customers love. From Facebook 'Likes' to branded tweets to Polyvore’s brand expression collages, it’s never been easier to share your opinion online."

But companies should be careful not to moderate or hide negative reviews, she adds.

"Promoting an 'open brand' ethos will lead to better informed and more passionate curators," Savitt writes.
Source: www.businessinsider.com

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