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20-06-2006
  46
Wanderlust
 
Salvatore's Avatar
 
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Some people do not purchase anything but custom-made pieces I'm sure for the ultimate fit and palpable expression of creativity. It is a part of a luxury lifestyle and as long as luxury is in place and there's money, couture will stay intact.

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sounds like "dirty European aristocracy".....

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20-06-2006
  47
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It's sort of sad that we don't get to see much of the couture worn in public. It's all those anonymous, rich people who buy it and then wear it to their parties. I like it better when celebs where it because then at least the public can enjoy it too.

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20-06-2006
  48
rêverie
 
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i agree. haute couture will still be in existence for a quite while. it's part of history and if ever couture houses will close (which i highly doubt), their creations will always be documented (through celebrities, royals, exhibitions, etc...). in regards to the comment about dior, the house has been a pioneer early in its establishment but these days it seems to rely too much on theatrics (^ circus...). we never know of its true nature by what we're provided on the runway. unless one's willing to be personally outfitted, work closely with galliano or throw out some serious cash, dior will always be just what we see on the runway. it hasn't been interesting for a while apart from some pieces but as a whole, it's just okay i guess.

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21-06-2006
  49
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my friend's once told me that, the consumers of the haute couture are mainly the nobles in the small countries which are still ruled by the *Kings and Queens*, mainly in distanted areas

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21-06-2006
  50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefei
my friend's once told me that, the consumers of the haute couture are mainly the nobles in the small countries which are still ruled by the *Kings and Queens*, mainly in distanted areas
and The american Royalty-

Hollywood

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21-06-2006
  51
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if couture does die then it will mean a greater separation between the world of fashion and the world of art surely? fashion will be something really superficial without the Art dimension that couture brings. I'm thinking about this in terms of designers doing whatever they want, not in terms of clothes being made to order by the client.

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21-06-2006
  52
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Haute Couture is art. It's unwearable for the general public, but isn't that the whole point? I mean, the pieces are so exquisite that only certain people, royalty, Hollywood, etc, could get away with it. That's what makes it so interesting to everyone else.

The pieces in the post above are seriously beautiful. Especially the YSL dress with a train.

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21-06-2006
  53
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Haute couture is meant to be art only.. the designer's main creative outlet.

It will never die because there will always be creative people.

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15-09-2010
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Haute Couture: Is it on its last legs?
From infoplease.com
Quote:
What is Haute Couture?
Uncovering the business of high fashion by David Johnson


The term "haute couture" is French. Haute means "high" or "elegant." Couture literally means "sewing," but has come to indicate the business of designing, creating, and selling custom-made, high fashion women's clothes.

Strict Regulations


To be called a haute couture house, a business must belong to the Syndical Chamber for Haute Couture in Paris, which is regulated by the French Department of Industry.

Members must employ 15 or more people and present their collections twice a year. Each presentation must include at least 35 separate outfits for day and eveningwear.


Glittering Names

The syndicate has about 18 members, including such fashion giants as Coco Chanel, Christian Dior, and Pierre Cardin. The houses generate more than
$1 billion in annual sales and employ close to 5,000 people, including 2,200 seamstresses. Workers often specialize in one area, such as feathers, fabric, buttons, shoes, etc. Before World War II, 35,000 people worked at couture houses.


Staggering Prices

Made from scratch for each customer, haute couture clothing typically requires three fittings. It usually takes from 100 to 400 hours to make one dress, costing from $26,000 to over $100,000. A tailored suit starts at $16,000, an evening gown at $60,000.


A Small Market

Today only 2,000 women in the world buy couture clothes; 60% are American. Only 200 are regular customers. Often, designers will loan clothes to movie stars or other public figures for publicity.





During fashion's "golden age," after World War II, some 15,000 women wore couture. Socialites such as the Duchess of Windsor, Babe Paley, and Gloria Guiness would order whole collections at a time.

Despite the small market, designers maintain haute couture operations partly because the prestige helps sell other products, such as perfume, cosmetics, and their ready-to-wear lines available in stores.
I was reading the thread about what happens to Haute Couture pieces after they are made and it reminded me that most people don't even know the difference between haute couture and prêt-à-porter and I wondered why that might happen.

So I did a bit of research and it seems that the fashion industry may be partially at fault .....

From wikapedia.com
Quote:


However, the term haute couture may have been misused by ready-to-wear brands since the late 1980s, so that its true meaning may have become blurred with that of prêt-à-porter (the French term for ready-to-wear fashion) in the public perception.


Every haute couture house also markets prêt-à-porter collections, which typically deliver a higher return on investment than their custom clothing. Falling revenues have forced a few couture houses to abandon their less profitable couture division and concentrate solely on the less prestigious prêt-à-porter. These houses, such as Italian designer Roberto Capucci, all of whom have their workshops in Italy, are no longer considered haute couture.



Many top designer fashion houses, such as Chanel, use the word for some of their special collections. These collections are often not for sale or they are very difficult to purchase.



Sometimes, "haute couture" is inappropriately used to label non-dressmaking activities, such as fine art, music and more.




I find it interesting that some ready-to-wear brands have deliberately misused the term "haute couture" so often. It's almost as if it has lost it's true meaning and they don't even care.




So, if the designers are not making much money on their haute couture creations because fewer and fewer customers can or will pay the price for a one of a kind fashion statement ... why are some still doing it? Is it profitable or not?

The bolded part of the infoplease.com article says that sometimes they use the pieces on a celeb for for publicity ... but wouldn't any beautiful gown serve the same purpose? Press coverage is press coverage ... as long as they say the name of the designer. Why would it have to be haute couture? (Actually, it's usually RTW, nowadays, it seems.)



It seems to me that all of this indicates that real haute couture is no longer realevent to anyone, other than a few very, very wealthy matrons. Is this a sign of it's demise? Are we seeing the last of a dying breed?



What are your thoughts about this?




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15-09-2010
  55
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It has reportedly been on its last legs since I was first aware that fashion existed, and in that time, business empires have risen and fallen, the economic climate has swung to and fro, technology has continued to change, yet couture keeps going - mainly so that journalists can keep writing that it is dying, it seems, given how many times I have seemingly read the above quoted piece. Then again, fashion itself recycles old ideas for a new day, but usually with some twist that makes you see new meaning in the materials and sources being used, so drawing from that article, I would be more concerned about the future of fashion reporting than haute couture.

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Last edited by tigerrouge; 15-09-2010 at 03:57 AM.
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15-09-2010
  56
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I don't quite know since I honestly do not know enough to voice an opinion on this, but thank you for the information, this was quite eye opening. I really hope this tradition does not die, looking at the wonderful pieces is good enough for me. (It's my fix, honestly lol)

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15-09-2010
  57
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I believe for the remaining houses like Chanel, Dior, and others, haute couture is somewhat of a tradition that the house is identified by. It gives them some type of prestige I guess you could say. To me, haute couture fuels all of the buying of Chanel and Dior handbags, fragrances, and other accessories because people attempt to buy into this image.

I think houses like Balenciaga and Balmain are continuing with the haute couture feeling without actually doing it if that makes sense. The feeling of special pieces and exclusivity is the same idea so that could be considered demi-couture, no ?

I think that haute couture is not going to die, it will just take someone to come along and excite it and make it more relevant widely again. I think Tisci is changing things, but someone will come and take it even further.

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sounds like "dirty European aristocracy".....

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16-09-2010
  58
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I think that the power houses like Chanel and Dior will continure to do Haute Couture for as long as money can let them. But I think that in order for a house to maintain its Hature Couture it should have a very talented designer and the ready-to-wear collections should sell in seconds, just like Lagerfeld at Chanel and Galliano at Dior. Both houses make a great amount of money and thats because both designers are very talented and they've made the houses what they are today, so therefor Hature Couture cannot survive without ready-to-wear now adays. But I do believe that if the economy falls Haute Couture will stop or there will be less creations of couture. I think that only ways for Haute Couture to go extinct is if there is no money and no one is interested in buying it or if people do not want to continue the tradition.

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17-09-2010
  59
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I side with Salvatore on this... Chanel and Dior will continue to produce haute couture as long as the money is there and I doubt it will ever end in my lifetime. The new money in places such as Russia and the Middle East will keep this art alive for several decades. The question should be: With all these businesses/investors buying up designer brands, what will happen to fashion world? Will it become a Microsoft vs Apple vs Google?

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17-09-2010
  60
Wanderlust
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rompecorazones View Post
I side with Salvatore on this... Chanel and Dior will continue to produce haute couture as long as the money is there and I doubt it will ever end in my lifetime. The new money in places such as Russia and the Middle East will keep this art alive for several decades. The question should be: With all these businesses/investors buying up designer brands, what will happen to fashion world? Will it become a Microsoft vs Apple vs Google?
Very amazing point ! It's kind of like in the music industry where there are the four major record labels that have so many small labels under them and control a large portion of the music heard on the radio. Undeniably, the sound has the creativity and speciality that the smaller independent labels and artists are making. It could be the same thing in the fashion industry where the price for being bought out by a major group/investory/whatever, a lot of personality and creativity is being held back. And since they are most likely for the money (which is not bad since they have invested millions into the brands), things and people ... even designers ... get cut if they are not producing. Look at Lacroix.

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sounds like "dirty European aristocracy".....

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