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18-10-2011
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I've always dressed in a feminine way, no matter what trends I shift to. I enjoy fun, bold and lady like type looks. Being a lady doesn't mean you are weak or boring. My strength comes from God, within myself, loved ones and my life experiences. I dress for God and myself, not for male or female approval.

Fashion allows us to dress how we want. Different strokes for different folks. If a female wants to dress super feminine, that's her business.

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24-10-2011
  92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Plain Jane View Post
But it's interesting, isn't it, that during the 1920s and the 1960s, clothing was very freeing for women at the same time that women were allowed more social freedom, whereas during the VIctorian period and the 1950s, when women were "angels in the house" and Betty Crockers, then they also wore corsets, and white gloves, and cinched in bell skirts, and pill box hats. To me there is a correlation that speaks loudly and clearly.
I know this post is a bit old, but I just noticed this thread.

It's interesting that you mention that in the Victorian period women were expected to be "angels in the house," I think that it's important to remember that first wave feminism began in the 19th century, so while there was this cloistering of women, in a sense, there was more to the picture. Women often argued that the vote was necessary for them to protect their role in the private sphere. There's a great difference between what was expected of women and what actually occurred.

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25-10-2011
  93
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There's nothing wrong with wearing and loving the fashions; women have choices these days, and shouldn't be judged on how they choose to dress. It is, however, problematic when you romanticize the 50's and take on that "born in the wrong era" mentality.

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What I find regressive is the notion that women should try to dress like eternal teenagers - or worse, like overgrown children - so I always welcome the return of any form of adult fashion.
IA, that's more anti feminist than anything.



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Originally Posted by rosiecheeks View Post
I do.. sort of. They were perhaps a bit, but I think it is a mere detail in mass of things that defined the era as opposed to the main 'theme'..
Oh totally. If I were living in the 1950's I would be forced to sit in the back of the bus, attend a different school and basically be treated like a 2nd class citizen. I'm sure oppression would've been the last thing on my mind.

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25-10-2011
  94
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^ Exactly ... mere details. The kind of things you'd hardly notice amid the joys of poodle skirts and watching 'Father Knows Best.' The kind of idyllic era where you can whistle in the wrong place at the wrong time (with skin the wrong color) and end up dead.

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25-10-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueorchid View Post
I know this post is a bit old, but I just noticed this thread.

It's interesting that you mention that in the Victorian period women were expected to be "angels in the house," I think that it's important to remember that first wave feminism began in the 19th century, so while there was this cloistering of women, in a sense, there was more to the picture. Women often argued that the vote was necessary for them to protect their role in the private sphere. There's a great difference between what was expected of women and what actually occurred.
Well sure. A period of unhappiness and repression can often be a catalyst for change. But it takes the efforts of many, and those who are willing to break with convention, to actually create change. The "feminist" movement on the 19th C was spurred on largely, at least in England, by the abolitionist movement. The women who were arguing that it is wrong to enslave people started to realize that they, too, were oppressed and they used that same language to fight for the vote. But when did women actually get the vote?!! It took a while.

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Last edited by Not Plain Jane; 25-10-2011 at 10:40 PM.
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27-10-2011
  96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Plain Jane View Post
Well sure. A period of unhappiness and repression can often be a catalyst for change. But it takes the efforts of many, and those who are willing to break with convention, to actually create change. The "feminist" movement on the 19th C was spurred on largely, at least in England, by the abolitionist movement. The women who were arguing that it is wrong to enslave people started to realize that they, too, were oppressed and they used that same language to fight for the vote. But when did women actually get the vote?!! It took a while.
WWI also played a part in securing women's right to vote in Britain. Since so many women did their part to help out the war efforts by being nurses and whatnot giving them the right to vote was almost seen as a reward. In 1918 women over the age of 30 were given the right to vote (mind you they had to own a home, or be married to a man who owned a home, and/or university graduates). It wasn't until 1928 that universal suffrage was granted. Sorry I just had to add this to the conversation just to put it into perspective even more. But I also wanted to add that clothing during this era was also changing. So while women were campaigning for rights clothing was getting looser and less constricted. In the years after WWI the corset lost it's popularity in fashion. Some women even dared to wear bloomers! The correlation between the two should certainly be noted. And in the 50's women's clothing I think was much more conservative and constricted. Also, in the 1940's- early 1950's the corset made a revival of sorts. So to me the way women dress and how they are treated go hand in hand.

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27-10-2011
  97
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Originally Posted by Pastry View Post
^
And this is season, it's just, "bam!" images of women dressing for men, not themselves.
It's just a strange move. I guess it reinforces the fact that fashions fade...and we all know the rest.
I think you've got a good point. But this whole thread is about how times have changed. Women dressed for their men like this in the fifties. Now, some men want, is a girl wearing a thong. Only a thong. But women don't do that, they're more independent. The fifties for them is the way they want to dress, not how their husbands want them to dress.

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27-10-2011
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I didn't see a lot of women choosing to dress like this on their own, with bandeau tops, cinched waists, white gloves, etc. Rather, shows like "Madmen" and the nostalgia of a few designers - esp in Milan - have suggested that this is the "new look" for the future, i.e., Spring 2012. This thread questions if it's a good "new (old) look," taking into account all the baggage it carries.

YoninahAliza, good points.

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28-10-2011
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yep i think its all about how independent we have been becoming through the years

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13-11-2011
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If women want to base their dress around the 1950s then they're either unaware of the hostile social environment of the time and are dressing for the sheer fun of it, or they ARE aware but the current present is so horrifying that the 1950s seem like a haven to return to. I'm not quite sure which is worse.

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13-11-2011
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^I think you make an interesting comment Squizree. I do think perhaps the resurgence of a 50's lady like look is a call for the comforting, fuzzy, happy family feelings the decade is remembered by a midst our own trying times. Of course the 50's were not all about that. But often decades of long ago are generalized into one mood because many do not have enough knowledge on the subject to think otherwise. I personally like the 50's look. But only the outward appearances of it. I admit when I emulate elements of the decade I am not thinking of the social implications those looks suggest only the outward elegance women of those days gave off.

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14-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squizree View Post
If women want to base their dress around the 1950s then they're either unaware of the hostile social environment of the time and are dressing for the sheer fun of it, or they ARE aware but the current present is so horrifying that the 1950s seem like a haven to return to. I'm not quite sure which is worse.
What about wearing something medieval-inspired, or ecclesiastically inspired? I have never seen anyone here freak out about that ...

The 50s were heaven for women compared to the Middle Ages ...

What about wearing something tribal or folk-inspired? Two regions of the world come to mind when I think about women being egregiously mistreated today, and both have had a recent influence on fashion.

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15-11-2011
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^ Sorry, I'm not getting what you mean. I'm not saying we should abject all thing 50s, in fact I really like that particular look and some pieces from Miuccia's latest collection were a testimony of that.

You also have to remember that no one remembers the Medieval times. The treatment of women during that time was worse to the Nth degree than the 1950s, but we can but only read about those times. They're not as personal as the 1950s because the women of today didn't experience the 1300s nor do they know anyone who did.

About woman-repressive nations influencing fashion... you would be surprised and shocked at how many people have no idea about the cultural origins of fashion. The reality is that most people will buy something if it looks good, not giving a second though about the cultural environment that it came from. I know this because I am from one of those places.

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15-11-2011
  104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squizree View Post
^ Sorry, I'm not getting what you mean. I'm not saying we should abject all thing 50s, in fact I really like that particular look and some pieces from Miuccia's latest collection were a testimony of that.

You also have to remember that no one remembers the Medieval times. The treatment of women during that time was worse to the Nth degree than the 1950s, but we can but only read about those times. They're not as personal as the 1950s because the women of today didn't experience the 1300s nor do they know anyone who did.

About woman-repressive nations influencing fashion... you would be surprised and shocked at how many people have no idea about the cultural origins of fashion. The reality is that most people will buy something if it looks good, not giving a second though about the cultural environment that it came from. I know this because I am from one of those places.
But people don't know what looks good. They have to be told. At least most people. To most people what looks good is what gives them the appropriate (or higher) social status.

There are certain things that appear to be pre-programmed, such as the fact that we find an hour glass form (slender or not so slender) attractive. However, even that has been tampered with in later years - leading in fact to that celebrities and models took drastic measures to decrease the female form by testosterone injections.

I mean, I think one of the main reasons that 50s fashion has been mostly gone as a powerful influence since the early 90s is because those types of fashions are very forgiving to the female problem areas. A couple of years ago you would see comments about how people wanted to wear skin-tight outfits primarily to show that they were still "perfect". With ideas like that you've got to ask yourself just how free we are....


Last edited by iluvjeisa; 15-11-2011 at 10:22 AM.
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15-11-2011
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^ Of yea for sure. It hardly needs to be said that what people consider to "look good" is often very manufactured. No doubt about it. I feel that's what modern trends are all about. But this problem starts all the way back in adolescence for most people, which is the fakest and most artificially constructed regime ever in modern society. From that young age kids are bombarded with what the world thinks "looks good" and it never leaves them. But that being said I think there are definitely some things that we naturally think looks good, such as the hourglass figure you mentioned.

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