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17-09-2011
  1
flaunt the imperfection
 
softgrey's Avatar
 
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Social media and luxury brands...
i read an article recently about this subject...
the article questioned who these luxury brands are reaching with social media...
for example:
looking at the number of fans a facebook page might have...
is the number of fans what's really important? or is it the quality of those fans that counts...

does it matter if hundreds, even thousands, of people follow your page if none of them buy your product?...


what do you think?

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19-09-2011
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Softgray, at the moment, it is unfortunately all about the numbers of followers. And its not the brands at fault but rather the closed nature of social networks.

Facebook, Twitter, Google+ all are guilty of hiding the number of 'ghost users'. Someone postulated the other day that Facebook may well have almost 30% of its 700,000,000 (thats seven hundred million!) users as fake. The problem is its very hard to verify whose real and whose not a real person.

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25-09-2011
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I used to work as a PR intern in the local office of a renowned british designer. one of my main duties was to figure out ways to boost up the no. of followers on the company's social media accounts. it's used as an assessment of how well the department is doing.

I guess the no. matters far more than the quality, people are more convinced by the numbers.

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25-09-2011
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Are you talking about that Forbes article?

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27-09-2011
  5
flaunt the imperfection
 
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i dont' remember...
do you have that article?...
maybe it's best to post it here...

it was saying how everyone has been so concerned with the numbers but that it's not really adding up to more sales...
so brands might have to rethink how they use social media to actually increase sales volume rather than just popularity on the internet...

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27-09-2011
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yeah, burberry has 8.5 million "likes" on facebook. not all of those folks are customers.

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27-09-2011
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^^exactly!!!

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27-09-2011
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On top of it .. how many fans does "Mugler" has?

and how many afford or even wear their stuff? None ... having "liked" a lux page make their very own FB pages seem more "upscale".

Dont get me wrong, I love it when they get creative like with Gucci and releasing songs. But most of the fans of those pages are clueless.

I do think it is key and important for emerging brands, and maybe for big ones in order to gain control of their image (I created a fan page on FB for Haider Ackermann and it got deleted within THREE days, I still dunno why when I specified twas a fan page, but I didnt want to cross FB/Big brother).

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27-09-2011
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@ facebook only the numbers count, growth rates...

I see it as simple way (=cheap) to reach a potential customers that never read fashion ads... however I doubt it convinces them change their spending habits, only imaginary numbers like always on the www :p

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29-09-2011
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I think social media is more about labels being able to talk to real people in a different way. You can put up all the billboards / mag ads / etc. that you like, but you'll never really hear the response. When you participate in social media, you do. No one online is scared to tell me they think our pieces are too expensive!

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03-10-2011
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What an interesting topic, I've never thought of that when I "liked" brands on facebook. I'm sure like agneslo mentioned, it may be all about the numbers. Especially since unfortunately, most people who "like" high end brands may be unable to afford anything. I'm sure facebook is just another way to advertise like in a magazine though.

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07-10-2011
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Numbers shouldn't matter in an online world where Facebook likes and Twitter followers can be bought on eBay for a few dollars (something that many brands do, which I personally think is slightly pathetic). But all brands need to be relevant in social media these days and find a way to extend their brand universe to the online world - something that some brands have been great at and others not so much... I personally find it most interesting to see how brands with "traditional" and "historic" values try to implement these values on their Facebook and Twitter accounts.

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07-10-2011
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I run the unofficial fan page of a brand and have 4x more users than the official one (mine has 12,500+ users). I thought they'd contact me to ask me to remove mine after they created their official page, but thankfully they didn't. I guess it's way more interesting for them in term of exposure to let me do my thing with my unofficial page than lose all these "fans".

I emailed them right before creating the page a few years back. I just got a "thank you for your interest in the brand..." but nothing more. They should have just hired me

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07-10-2011
  14
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You probably drive "curious" viewers to their site via yours! LOL

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07-10-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by softgrey View Post
i dont' remember...
do you have that article?...
maybe it's best to post it here...

it was saying how everyone has been so concerned with the numbers but that it's not really adding up to more sales...
so brands might have to rethink how they use social media to actually increase sales volume rather than just popularity on the internet...

Oh ok, it was a different article, but I do believe this can tie into this discussion.

Quote:
Why Facebook Is A Threat To Lifestyle Brands
By Alexander Chernev


Polo, Gucci, Swatch, Dove, Gillette—all have become successful lifestyle brands. They play an important role in our lives by allowing us to express our values and define ourselvesto the world. At first glance, it seems the emergence of Facebook as a platform for social networking can only enhance the ability of these brands to create value for their customers. Indeed, social networking deepens brands’ connection with consumers by enabling brand loyalists to communicate directly with one another as well as with the company.

This, however, is only one side of the coin. The other side is that social interactions such as those enabled by Facebook also can have the opposite effect, weakening lifestyle brands and decreasing brand equity. The reason lies in the very essence of lifestyle brands.

Lifestyle branding appeals to managers because it offers what appears to be a relatively easy way to sidestep competition and connect with customers on a more personal level. The problem with this line of reasoning, however, is that consumers’ need for self-expression is not without limits and, like any other need, can be satiated. This means that lifestyle brands do not evade the competition; instead they end up competing for a share of a consumer’s identity. And as an increasing number of brands turn to lifestyle positioning, the competition among self-expressive brands intensifies. As a result, the competitive advantage a brand might have gained by pioneering a presence on Facebook is likely to fade away as the majority of lifestyle brands follow this lead and establish their presence on Facebook as well.

But Facebook can have even farther reaching consequences for lifestyle brands. Our need for self-expression is a fundamental human need that can be satiated by various means, not only by company-created brands. We express ourselves through our hobbies, by listening to our favorite music, cheering for our home teams, going to our favorite restaurants and clubs, and socializing with family and friends. Befriending personally relevant social groups and sharing our “likes” and preferences on Facebook allow us to further assert ourselves, ultimately decreasing our reliance on lifestyle brands to express our identities. And the more opportunities we have to express ourselves through social networks, the less likely we are to rely on lifestyle brands. Thus, by providing a platform for self-expression, Facebook can inadvertently make lifestyle brands less relevant.

This, of course, does not mean that Facebook is a threat to all lifestyle brands; there clearly will be winners and losers. Nevertheless, because our need for self-expression has boundaries and can be satiated via our social interactions, Facebook will make achieving a successful lifestyle positioning a whole lot more challenging.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarket...estyle-brands/

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