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31-07-2010
  136
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PonyShow's Avatar
 
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I blog about fashion, things that interest me. I present the topic and pictures, and then put a quick sentence of my opinion. I'm not about to go into some really long essay about what I think about this and that and this and that, because frankly, I know people are just looking at the pictures anyway. Hahah... It's not that serious to be honest. Yes, I spend a lot of time updating my site, but it's fun! Fashion is FUN to me, not taken so seriously.

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31-07-2010
  137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PonyShow View Post
I blog about fashion, things that interest me. I present the topic and pictures, and then put a quick sentence of my opinion. I'm not about to go into some really long essay about what I think about this and that and this and that, because frankly, I know people are just looking at the pictures anyway. Hahah... It's not that serious to be honest. Yes, I spend a lot of time updating my site, but it's fun! Fashion is FUN to me, not taken so seriously.
It should be just fun, it should be passionate....all of those things. You can be serious and sincere about image composition as well.

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31-07-2010
  138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shockalika View Post
I must confess, my opinion on the subject is veeeery serious. How do we know a real fashion blogger? There are some pretty simple people out there who simply get a white blog on an easy platform, and start to post pictures every now and then. Usually pics from catalogues, maybe last season (year?!), podiums if they're lucky. And they post it without any particular order or serious purpose at least. The only reason they do it is because they find the term "fashion blogger" very hip and think what they are doing gives them the right & evidence to go and say - hey, I'm a fashion blogger! Only they are not.

Take Tavi for example. Only recently she began to add text to her blog, which I look at pretty irregularly as there is loads more interesting (and truly professional) blogs out there. She got popular because she was one of the first ones who took fashion blogging so sreiously - and quickly progressed to a certain wide audience of readers. The designers, knowing this, invite her to their shows, give her gifts and all that in hope of her writing a goooood report on her blog for a few thousands to read. So what happens? Tavi is just a little kid who can't say "no", she doesn't have any qualifications (does she even have secondary education yet?!) and her trying-to-stand-out-of-the-crowd style has gone horribly, horribly WRONG. I am not saying that a person of a young age is forbidden to show talent, but I do not tolerate unprofessionalism. Therefore, Tavi cannot give a professional opinion of ANY of the collections she sees, and neither can she say anything bad about the designer now, for he/she has invited her to the front row. Result? An unobjective opinion and false reports to blog.
I've been blogging for YEARS, since I was 10 years old (when I began designing websites), which means I've watched trends rise and fall in the blogging world for over ten years. Fashion is honestly just one of the more recent ones. I think people are taking it seriously because it's so far turned out to be one of the more profitable trends, and that's okay.

A fashion blogger is someone who blogs about fashion, simple as that. We can choose to separate good from bad fashion bloggers, serious from recreational fashion bloggers, but it is what it is. There is no "real" or "fake." I don't think any elitism should be attached to the term, because blogging, in the end, has always been about expressing personal opinion on an open forum. There are no "rules" to blogging, and there never have been. There is no minimum word count, minimum photo count, or age requirement. Posting runway photos from three seasons ago does not disqualify someone as a fashion blogger, lol.

I am sure that designers know what risks they are taking by giving a young girl front-row access to their shows. Perhaps the designers see her as qualified because she takes fashion risks, dresses insanely for someone her age, and most importantly, loves fashion (whether or not her definition of loving fashion is the same as yours.) Their "qualifications" may be separate from yours.

Rather than scoffing at a young girl who is propelled into fame for keeping a blog, I think we should all see what great opportunities blogging can provide. When I see someone who dismisses these things at trends and approaches blogging with an elitist attitude, I have to wonder how new they are to the blogging world, because honestly this is just a cycle that is replaced every few years by something new (at one point it was travel, then it was photography, then it was food, etc etc).

It has never been easier to be an artist or writer since the age of the internet, and rather than trying to latch on to the elitism that previously prevailed in creative fields, I think we should let go of it.

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01-08-2010
  139
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I agree with some and disagree with others with respect to the comments already posted.

I like that blogging allows us "little people" to contribute (as we see fit) to the world of fashion (or whatever a person chooses to blog about). Personally, I'm a little tired of being dictated to by the powers that be. Blogging brings power to the people.

As for the post about if you "put yourself out there", you should expect (embrace?) criticism -- nope, no way. To me, that is the equivalent of saying that unless you are perfect, you should hide yourself away from the the world. *Everyone* deserves to have the freedom of using the blogging platform. I would say that it is OK to constructively criticize, but since almost no one IMO has mastered the art of tact, I no longer think that even "constructive criticism" is OK. Besides, who has the right to judge others? And no one has to read what they don't like, as has been already posted.

I have a ps blog and don't expect anything from it -- no merchandise, no trips, etc. Mostly it is a hobby and, to a lesser extent, a way for my family and friends (who live far away) to "keep up" with me somewhat.

Are bloggers narcissistic? Maybe. Confident? For sure.

This was a very good idea for a thread topic and is quite enjoyable reading.

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01-08-2010
  140
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Blogging has democratized media, so you vote with your mouse. If you don't like a blog or think its unprofessional or fake, don't click the link.

I blog, I'm not a writer by trade, I'm nowhere near a teen. I have a professional career but want to develop my skills in the off chance that with time perhaps I could do it professionally. If that never happens, fine. But you never know until you try.

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02-08-2010
  141
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spottie View Post
I agree with some and disagree with others with respect to the comments already posted.

I like that blogging allows us "little people" to contribute (as we see fit) to the world of fashion (or whatever a person chooses to blog about). Personally, I'm a little tired of being dictated to by the powers that be. Blogging brings power to the people.

As for the post about if you "put yourself out there", you should expect (embrace?) criticism -- nope, no way. To me, that is the equivalent of saying that unless you are perfect, you should hide yourself away from the the world. *Everyone* deserves to have the freedom of using the blogging platform. I would say that it is OK to constructively criticize, but since almost no one IMO has mastered the art of tact, I no longer think that even "constructive criticism" is OK. Besides, who has the right to judge others? And no one has to read what they don't like, as has been already posted.

I have a ps blog and don't expect anything from it -- no merchandise, no trips, etc. Mostly it is a hobby and, to a lesser extent, a way for my family and friends (who live far away) to "keep up" with me somewhat.

Are bloggers narcissistic? Maybe. Confident? For sure.

This was a very good idea for a thread topic and is quite enjoyable reading.
i agree with you in many things.
one example is that everyone has the right to blog, no matter who they are/what they do/if they're in the industry or even complete outsiders. i believe that this diversity can be very inspiring as people that come from various places and backgrounds see fashion and style in different colours. i always like hearing others' opinions, it's interesting and can make me discover new things to like.
however i believe that constructive criticism is a very good thing - it motivates you to develop and become better all the time. i'm personally very thankful for this kind of criticism although in the beginning it was hard for me to accept it.

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06-08-2010
  142
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this is a very interesting topic and i thoroughly have enjoyed reading the comments for this one. as for me i do not follow or read opinionated fashion blogs like Tavi’s or Bryanboy’s though i am not entirely opposed to them blogging about fashion, though i do follow streetstyle ones which i find more visually informative and inspiring. it educates the reader about style and trends and even fashion photography, without intentionally inviting ridicule on itself.

as for the more popular type of fashion bloggers who chronicle and comment to whatever fancies their noggin’, i find it pleasantly amusing and downright ludicrous at the same time. blogging has completely revolutionized fashion commentary, turning it into the primary form of fashion entertainment in the web; the most original fashion bloggers have all risen from anonymity to the forefront of fashion celebs all due to their uniqueness, and their intrepidity, posting with a devil-may-care attitude, posting away regardless of the validity of their comments to the eyes of the fashion industry... which is i think what draws thousands of fans to follow them, and the higher fashion personalities to adore them. i find this both positive and negative at the same time, since ofcourse, blogging is for everyone, and if everyone can express their love for fashion then all the better.

however, a few years ago it was still an astounding feat for fashion bloggers to be able to acquire such a huge audience just by relentlessly posting how crazy they were for this bag or that collection or that model, but now that fashion has entered the digital age, the supply has far outstripped demand when it comes to fashion blogs and clearly there is a form of elitism that has developed from having too much of the same thing; that a fashion blog can be deemed preposterous unless its relevance is proven, either by content or by popularity. and this again leads to the significance of a blog, whether the blogger is just an abject famewhore who only wants to gain popularity out of blogging through fashion (fame is the #1 perk with fashion blogging imo), or whether the blog really is worth the fuss because the content is good without the blogger making a spectacle of himself.

blame it on how the internet has expanded freedom of speech into monstrous proportions; even a dog can blog about fashion nowadays (and probably get famous for it). but at the end of the day i think it all boils down to the fact that fashion blogging is just an outcome of fashion being made more accessible in this age, which is always a pro for everyone.

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09-08-2010
  143
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@spottie
Constructive criticism goes with almost everything though. Art, literature, music, culinary endeavors, television, etc. So how can you say that people who blog shouldn't be allowed to be criticized constructively by other people? It sounds like a bit of a cheat to me. "Oh, I would like to have a blog, but I don't want the people to criticize it.. well unless they're giving me praise, well then yes I'm okay with that!" That reminds me of a small essay I read by Chuck Klosterman about how an author wrote a book about how the internet has negatively affected our society.(i.e. the anonymity, and scathing criticism people give) But Klosterman noted that the only reason the author wrote such book was because he himself received scathing criticism on his own website. If such thing had not happened, the author would've continued with the masses in conducting with anonymity and not written that book at all. Which makes me believe that's why you think bloggers shouldn't be criticized. Maybe you've been though something similar like that author?

Look there will always be people on the internet who are just out there to be just plain rude and mean, because they've gotten nothing else to do, and they find it gratifying to put other people down (visit YouTube, and you'll get my drift). Criticism can be beneficial because, it not only helps you build a tough skin when those types of people who only go out of their way to say just mean and horrible stuff, but it also helps you analyze and get better at what you're lacking in. When a person says, "Listen the reason I'm not interested in your blog, is because it's only content seems to be of you taking pictures of yourself in pre-conceived pretentious positions. I'm a person that's interested in a little more content than just pictures of yourself. And that's why I'm not interested in you're blog, and that could possibly why you're blog isn't as big as you want it to be."

To say that fashion bloggers shouldn't have to be given criticism just seems absurd and a bit of a cop out to me. Yet somehow fashion bloggers are allowed to still give their critique of a fashion show, or an editorial? Right, just as long as you don't critique my blog.

Even the most prestigious prints and online prints still receive criticism! Just recently The Sartorialist, Scott Schumann has been receiving flack for shooting more famous people as opposed to his older stuff of just regular people.

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Last edited by micahslope; 09-08-2010 at 03:59 PM.
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09-08-2010
  144
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^^Well said!

For those who are looking for popularity (admittedly not something I really encourage anyone to look for, but ...) you should know, when you reach a certain degree of popularity there will be criticism. It's more or less a guarantee. Some receive it more than others, yes, however, in regards to everyone well-known that I can think of, I know people who like them and people who don't. Odds are if you're a true individual and not attempting to please everyone (which is essentially impossible), there will be people who not only dislike, there may also be people who absolutely detest you (and perhaps unfairly, in some cases, but that's how it goes). This can be a good thing in my opinion, if you receive much praise, a little criticism can go a ways to keeping you grounded. And as Winston Churchill quite wisely said, "You've got enemies? Good. That means you actually stood up for something in your life."

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09-08-2010
  145
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I'll try my best to make sense instead of sounding like I'm rambling about nothing. I have a blog (non fashion related) and it's rarely updated simply because most of the time I don't have anything important or meaningful to say. For the past couple of days I thought about adding new content which is kind of useless because no one reads it besides a 17 year old kid. Well from my angle-my blog which I overhauled last spring I mainly focus on my poetry and blogged about my perspective and briefly touched upon personal beliefs about poetry and writing in general.

Just like poetry the online world breathed life into it but also takes something away. Fashion blogging is similar to the online poetry movement. It helped to open a door, a barrier and allowed people to share something that they wouldn't or couldn't before the the world of blogging existed. In some strange way it gave a voice to the voice-free. But there is also a drawback. Over saturation or perhaps over population. Eventually most will get tired, bored, too busy or move on from the world of blogging or maybe I'm saying this because I blog sporadically.

I'm not quite sure how to explain this. Most of us (including myself) blog about something we love. And to love something there is no real requirement to understand it or the terms and technicalities behind them. Look, I have a blog about my poetry and I never took a poetry class. I'm not an expert and have no real interest to be an expert. And my experiences comes from years of writing and reading poetry.

Blogs are now and the future. I don't think they'll ever go away. It's ingrained in our culture.

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09-08-2010
  146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silk skin paws View Post
I'll try my best to make sense instead of sounding like I'm rambling about nothing. I have a blog (non fashion related) and it's rarely updated simply because most of the time I don't have anything important or meaningful to say. For the past couple of days I thought about adding new content which is kind of useless because no one reads it besides a 17 year old kid. Well from my angle-my blog which I overhauled last spring I mainly focus on my poetry and blogged about my perspective and briefly touched upon personal beliefs about poetry and writing in general.

Just like poetry the online world breathed life into it but also takes something away. Fashion blogging is similar to the online poetry movement. It helped to open a door, a barrier and allowed people to share something that they wouldn't or couldn't before the the world of blogging existed. In some strange way it gave a voice to the voice-free. But there is also a drawback. Over saturation or perhaps over population. Eventually most will get tired, bored, too busy or move on from the world of blogging or maybe I'm saying this because I blog sporadically.

I'm not quite sure how to explain this. Most of us (including myself) blog about something we love. And to love something there is no real requirement to understand it or the terms and technicalities behind them. Look, I have a blog about my poetry and I never took a poetry class. I'm not an expert and have no real interest to be an expert. And my experiences comes from years of writing and reading poetry.

Blogs are now and the future. I don't think they'll ever go away. It's ingrained in our culture.
So beautifully put.
I too blog non fashion related content, mainly to showcase my visual art because I run a little online business and communicate with customers and clients in this way. I also blog because I love to share the work, sharing thoughts and ideas with others of a like mind.
I have been blogging for many years now, and I can fully identify with your comment regarding over saturation: there were points when I simply felt overcome, almost contaminated by similar content, which for some reason seemed to dilute the experience to a certain extent. I dare say the same goes for fashion bloggers, and all of those who begin to do so as a result of passion for the subject matter - be it professional or not.

Because I am not a fashion blogger, I do occasionally enjoy perusing them (perusing, what a word!), but tend to become a little phased after a while, for so many seem to cover the same content, exhibit the same style, influences, etc. Perhaps this is how it is supposed to be, but it tires me somewhat.

I used to enjoy fashion related imagery on Flickr, although again that daunting 'sameness' prevails.......pigeon toed, vintage clad girl in sun-shot wheat field holding up a spray of balloons.....pretty, inspirational, but so, so repetitive.

However, I am quite fond of blogging, more so because I do not expect or crave popularity, only to share and learn, to communicate. I prefer to keep a balance between business related content and the more 'everyday' aspects of my art. And once in a while the thrill of discovering a brand new gem by another blogger (fashion, art or otherwise) makes it all worth while. I have learned to take the rough with the smooth, so to speak. I wonder if we will ever 'come of age' with blogging.......I certainly have a different, more relaxed attitude to it now than say 5 years ago. I also wonder what our attitude to blogging/blog reading says about ourselves. Such a fascinating wilderness it is!


Last edited by Lapin de Lune; 09-08-2010 at 10:33 PM.
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13-08-2010
  147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spottie View Post
I agree with some and disagree with others with respect to the comments already posted.

I like that blogging allows us "little people" to contribute (as we see fit) to the world of fashion (or whatever a person chooses to blog about). Personally, I'm a little tired of being dictated to by the powers that be. Blogging brings power to the people.

As for the post about if you "put yourself out there", you should expect (embrace?) criticism -- nope, no way. To me, that is the equivalent of saying that unless you are perfect, you should hide yourself away from the the world. *Everyone* deserves to have the freedom of using the blogging platform. I would say that it is OK to constructively criticize, but since almost no one IMO has mastered the art of tact, I no longer think that even "constructive criticism" is OK. Besides, who has the right to judge others? And no one has to read what they don't like, as has been already posted.

I have a ps blog and don't expect anything from it -- no merchandise, no trips, etc. Mostly it is a hobby and, to a lesser extent, a way for my family and friends (who live far away) to "keep up" with me somewhat.

Are bloggers narcissistic? Maybe. Confident? For sure.

This was a very good idea for a thread topic and is quite enjoyable reading.

I agree, but this is a bit of a romanticized view. I try to be open minded when it comes to fashion blogs because I do like seeing how people outfit themselves in their everyday lives as a form of expression. And perhaps I am being too cynical (actually, I'm sure I am), but I think fashion blogging has become a showcase for delusional attention seekers & narcissists.

I find it all a bit overwhelming yet underwhelming at the same time. Most of the time I find it to be just one big trendy showcase full of overworked fashion. I suppose this is the beauty and the beast of the fashion world--keeping up with fun cultural moods/trends, yet remaining an individual, but the internet has added a whole new element of annoyance...it has completely sucked the life out of any personality or individuality and bastardized a lot of fashion.

...And I do think most bloggers are well meaning people just trying to be fashionable and express themselves. I suppose I really just don't like how fashion blogging has become a platform for fame and free stuff for something that should be lighthearted and fun.


Last edited by ladi; 13-08-2010 at 12:43 AM.
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14-08-2010
  148
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micahslope View Post
@spottie
Constructive criticism goes with almost everything though. Art, literature, music, culinary endeavors, television, etc. So how can you say that people who blog shouldn't be allowed to be criticized constructively by other people? It sounds like a bit of a cheat to me. "Oh, I would like to have a blog, but I don't want the people to criticize it.. well unless they're giving me praise, well then yes I'm okay with that!" That reminds me of a small essay I read by Chuck Klosterman about how an author wrote a book about how the internet has negatively affected our society.(i.e. the anonymity, and scathing criticism people give) But Klosterman noted that the only reason the author wrote such book was because he himself received scathing criticism on his own website. If such thing had not happened, the author would've continued with the masses in conducting with anonymity and not written that book at all. Which makes me believe that's why you think bloggers shouldn't be criticized. Maybe you've been though something similar like that author?

Look there will always be people on the internet who are just out there to be just plain rude and mean, because they've gotten nothing else to do, and they find it gratifying to put other people down (visit YouTube, and you'll get my drift). Criticism can be beneficial because, it not only helps you build a tough skin when those types of people who only go out of their way to say just mean and horrible stuff, but it also helps you analyze and get better at what you're lacking in. When a person says, "Listen the reason I'm not interested in your blog, is because it's only content seems to be of you taking pictures of yourself in pre-conceived pretentious positions. I'm a person that's interested in a little more content than just pictures of yourself. And that's why I'm not interested in you're blog, and that could possibly why you're blog isn't as big as you want it to be."

To say that fashion bloggers shouldn't have to be given criticism just seems absurd and a bit of a cop out to me. Yet somehow fashion bloggers are allowed to still give their critique of a fashion show, or an editorial? Right, just as long as you don't critique my blog.

Even the most prestigious prints and online prints still receive criticism! Just recently The Sartorialist, Scott Schumann has been receiving flack for shooting more famous people as opposed to his older stuff of just regular people.
Perhaps I was unclear ... my point is that way too many people consider destructive criticism to be the same as constructive criticism. Until people learn how to criticize with tact, I'll forego the "constructive criticism". That said, I forego the praise, as well. I don't accept any commenting on my blog.

To be even more clear ... I consider this to be a good example of constructive criticism --> Have you considered (that with your coloring) you'd look amazing in purple? Destructive criticism (trying to be passed off as constuctive) example --> You look like Swamp Thing in that outfit.

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Last edited by spottie; 14-08-2010 at 05:02 AM.
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14-08-2010
  149
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I'm feel so-so about bloggers. On one hand I love to look at the pictures that bloggers post from magazines and of themselves. On the other hand, I think it's silly to sit on the corner or sometimes literally IN the road similar to a homeless person and take pictures. I wonder what goes through the minds of the blogger, the photographer, and the people passing that scene. I could understand if you were a model and getting paid to sit there, but if the outcome is only to put a picture up on your blog, well that's just silly to me. Yet, I enjoy those pictures...or at least what they're wearing in them. So that's my mixed feelings on this subject. Love it? Yes. And think it's pretentious at the same time.

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14-08-2010
  150
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How much can the cut, fashionista's bloggers get paid? just out of curious mind

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