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18-04-2012
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I actually agree with Jane's reasoning for not wanting to go to college, her point about not wanting to rack up debt when she already has a career going is a logical and wise one. Moreover, many intelligent and successful people don't go to college, or even finish high school. However, I think she could use a certain "real world" education where a person's biggest problem in life is not which shoe(s) to bring home from Barneys. Her tone on her blog, and worse her Twitter, was very similar to the girl that was portrayed in the newspaper article -- a condescending, naive, spoiled brat. She is still very young though, what 19?, maybe she'll grow out of it.

Personality aside, I'd probably still follow her blog, but I feel like her style has swung in a direction that doesn't appeal to me. I actually don't think she's contrived, I think she genuinely has eccentric (and I'll even say interesting) taste in movies, clothes, art, etc. but she has become a little too avant-garde for my liking over the past year or so.

I agree with iluvejeisa's point, that at least she's not a mindless cookie-cutter girl who dresses and looks like everyone else, and has these over-thought scripted ingenue answers for everything. ...To me that's a fate worse than being a little snobby.

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18-04-2012
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I find Jane and her mother a bit creepy to be honest ( and that article just confirmed my opinion) but it was actually an interesting read, i think it's fascinating that we got to a stage that some people only live through their online persona. Like they are not "real" if they do not have thousands of people confirming their existence on the internet.

I do not understand the furore this article caused, it is not a negative piece. So what if she does not want to go to college, she does not have to, and earns a lot of money blogging? Actually her reaction to backlash, to me was the worst of it, you do not go happily on TV to promote the article with the writer, and then because people did not like what you said about your sister or your horror of sales, decide to claim the piece is all lies.

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19-04-2012
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I also find it odd that Jane and her mom just sit around their house taking pics of themselves in fancy clothes. Jane lives like she is in a gilded cage. I'm guessing all Jane's high school friends went away to college and have to wonder who she hangs with in Dallas? What does she do all day with no school or work to occupy her time after she's done with the days photo-shoot?

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23-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lapin de Lune View Post
I tend to believe there is a fashion blog out there to suit all (or most) personal tastes.
Elitism? Haven't we evolved beyond this type of classism?
Many people cannot afford to get an education, yet they still have a right to express or indulge in a passion for clothing and style.
but her parents can afford to spend 70,000grand on shoes for her..

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27-04-2012
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My comment was in response to an earlier discussion, not at all to do with Jane. I think I wandered in haphazardly there

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29-04-2012
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I'm actually disappointed that Jane isn't going to college. I think it would be a great experience for her and it would add a different dimension to her blog. While many applaud her having these tastes while living in a remote part of Texas, it doesn't work for her social skills. It's easy to have a conversation online and create a persona, but to back it up live and in person is a different story and I think the college experience could've added to it.

To each there own.

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30-04-2012
  397
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^ I totally agree. College is such a different experience and I think it would have been great for her style evolution and writing. Obviously, everyone is different, but it could add a new level to her blog and help her develop.

She's been blogging for so long though, so she clearly enjoys it and if she's doing what she loves then fair play to her.

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30-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by educo View Post
I'm actually disappointed that Jane isn't going to college. I think it would be a great experience for her and it would add a different dimension to her blog. While many applaud her having these tastes while living in a remote part of Texas, it doesn't work for her social skills. It's easy to have a conversation online and create a persona, but to back it up live and in person is a different story and I think the college experience could've added to it.

To each there own.
That's part of the reason I think she's content to stay in Texas. Unless she goes to one of those liberal arts colleges on the East Coast known to harbor rich kids and socialites she'd really be out of place at a traditional campus where kids are more worried about midterms and finals than high designer clothes. I'm wondering if she doesn't already feel terribly isolated. There can't be too many people her age who have the resources to not work or go to school and can chill with her all day.

I agree her blog would be more interesting from a college student perspective. She could have maybe demonstrated how she stayed true to her style while being practical in a college environment.

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30-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loladonna View Post
That's part of the reason I think she's content to stay in Texas. Unless she goes to one of those liberal arts colleges on the East Coast known to harbor rich kids and socialites she'd really be out of place at a traditional campus where kids are more worried about midterms and finals than high designer clothes. I'm wondering if she doesn't already feel terribly isolated. There can't be too many people her age who have the resources to not work or go to school and can chill with her all day.

I agree her blog would be more interesting from a college student perspective. She could have maybe demonstrated how she stayed true to her style while being practical in a college environment.

Well that's my point. She should go to a place that's not within her comfort zone. That will show you what she's made of. But by being in her comfort zone with her mom answering her emails and booking appointments, how many other challenges could she be possibly confronted with? Not many.

It's just a shame that she has these very particular tastes, and they sort of just exist in this bubble. I would've love to see her take her imagination to the streets.

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01-05-2012
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that article about the sea of shoes jane...

it is actually quite scary to read.
she acts like ridicilous little 12 years old girl.
wich is not suprise because she have gotten everything
she wanted in her life.
she just can point finger here and there
and her dad and mom will buy it.

i really think collage would have made her grow up a little bit.
a lot actully.

it also seems like she have zero social skills.

anyway, whatever everyone likes.
but reading this article made me even more happy about my life.

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02-05-2012
  401
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenna-maria View Post
she acts like ridicilous little 12 years old girl.
wich is not suprise because she have gotten everything
she wanted in her life.


it also seems like she have zero social skills.
It's very dangerous to make assumptions about people based on what you read about them in the media.

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02-05-2012
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i think its safe to make an assumption after thousands of blog posts...

i wonder if any of these luxury brands provide bloggers with a 1099 tax form for all the luxury goods they are receiving. it is income after all.

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06-05-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucy92 View Post
i think its safe to make an assumption after thousands of blog posts...
Not really, because a blog is not a reflection of the blogger's life as a whole. Fashion is just one of many segments of a blogger's life. I once wrote on my own blog that a blog is not an accurate representation of the blogger's life because it only shows what the blogger wants you to see. It's not objective. Even if it were, my point remains that you can't make assumptions, judge a person or think you know them until you've actually spent a considerable amount of time in their company.

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06-05-2012
  404
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeatherAnne View Post
I agree with iluvejeisa's point, that at least she's not a mindless cookie-cutter girl who dresses and looks like everyone else, and has these over-thought scripted ingenue answers for everything. ...To me that's a fate worse than being a little snobby.
Well, lets just say I wish every snobby person had taste like hers. It would be a better world.

All fashion personalities build up an outer persona that has little to do with their inner being.

To me, at the end of the day, she has a blog that doesn't contain one ugly image, not one boring image....whoever does the work (because obviously she can't do it all alone) is doing a fantastic job.

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05-06-2012
  405
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To Pay or Not to Pay: A Closer Look at the Business of Blogging

The love affair between bloggers and fashion brands and retailers is entering its next phase. And like in many relationships, money is a big part of the question.

There’s been some backlash from designers and brands as they question having to pay bloggers from $5,000 up to $50,000 to work with them. Skeptics question whether paying bloggers results in significant return on investment, especially in comparison to a magazine or television ad. Besides, some brands contend, if bloggers are journalists, journalists aren’t paid for writing about a company.

Bloggers argue back that their fees have substantial ROI because blogs can drive millions of page views a month both on their sites and the brand’s Web site. So why shouldn’t they be paid? And while some bloggers are journalists in the true sense, most of them don’t consider themselves journalists on par with those at The New York Times or the The Wall Street Journal. They are more like columnists, expressing opinions about what they see.

“When you want to work with a blogger in a way that you would with any influencer — whether it’s a photographer, a stylist, a designer for your windows, a public endorser of your brand, advertising or a design collaboration — that’s where you have to compensate because you would compensate anyone for those things,” said Karen Robinovitz, co-founder and chief creative officer of Digital Brand Architects, who considers herself the pioneer of “blogger agents.”

She pointed out that if a brand sends a blogger a box of clothes with the intent of having them create four dedicated full looks that they need shot for posts, the talent has to location scout — and is responsible for styling, hair, makeup, photography, art direction, retouching, copywriting and posting.

“That takes a magazine sometimes 20 people to pull off,” Robinovitz said.

The tension between brands and bloggers is resulting from the ever-evolving world of the Web. As brands increase their involvement with bloggers in terms of coverage and projects, the line between what they should be paid for and what they shouldn’t is growing increasingly blurry.

For between $5,000 and $20,000, a brand can work with an influential blogger to host an event (plus airfare, hotel and entertainment, of course) — one that gets upward of a few million page views a month and will cross-promote the brand on the blogger’s site (although the jury is still out on proving ROI from page views, with sales being the only concrete measure). Starting from $20,000 to $25,000 (and up), a company can book a blogger for various weeklong projects during Fashion Week — with some bloggers fetching nearly $50,000 for even longer-term partnerships. In 2010, Bryanboy’s Bryan Grey Yambao boasted that he made more than $100,000 a year from blogging (and got a lot of flack for it) — which by today’s standards seems quite low for a top-tier blogger, especially when one factors in the partnerships with advertising and other heavily integrated projects.

But how can brands know the money is well spent? Neiman Marcus measures the effectiveness of a campaign by tracking page views, uniques, impressions, referral traffic, as well as engagement through “likes,” comments, retweets, replies, brand mentions, shares and increases in in-bound and out-bound links, according to vice president of corporate public relations Gabrielle de Papp.

She recently voiced a complaint about the going rates for bloggers at a panel with Song of Style’s Aimee Song at the Lucky Blogger Conference in Santa Monica, Calif., where she said, “editorially sized budgets” sometimes hinder the ability to work with bloggers.

De Papp later clarified her comments, explaining that although she believes bloggers are as integral to the brand as traditional journalists, there needs to be a differentiation between a blogger getting paid for a campaign (which is more advertising and p.r.) versus editorial outreach. “This is where the boundaries are murky,” she said, justifying that the retailer will pay a blogger a rate that climbs into the tens of thousands of dollars for advertising or e-mail campaigns because the company is in effect hiring talent to validate the brand name and who can also leverage their followers.

“From an event perspective, we don’t have enormous p.r. budgets, so if we have to pay $10,000 or $20,000 for a blogger to host an event for us, that can be really challenging and not always realistic. It’s a shame because there’s so much value in having blogger-hosted events. They have authenticity and followers, and it brings their audience into our store,” de Papp said.

She drew a distinction between blogger appearances for the retailer and advertising, though. “We don’t pay for celebrities to host events or to wear our clothes, we don’t pay for designers to come to our store, and we don’t pay them a fee to make a designer p.a. at the store,” said de Papp.

She stressed that her team pitches bloggers the same way they do journalists — and if the pitch doesn’t work with their blog then that’s fine. What she calls challenging is when a blogger responds saying they will write about a product or concept, but for a fee. “We would never do that. We don’t pay journalists,” de Papp said. “I have the utmost respect for the blogger community, but I don’t have a budget to pay for product placement and the line between what’s advertising and what’s editorial just needs to be clear.”

Song’s blog, which received 2 million page views in April, has worked with Seven For All Mankind, True Religion, Fossil, Levi’s, Smart Car and Macy’s — all for compensation.

“Although bloggers aren’t celebrities — a lot of us have a decent audience, and sometimes with social media, we can have [even] larger audiences,” Song said, pointing out that when she posts an article of clothing and links to it on an Instagram post — where she has over 100,000 followers — the item can sell out that day. “Before, when I was super naïve and starting out, I would collaborate with brands without getting paid and do it for free,” she said.

She is currently traveling cross-country with Macy’s on behalf of its Bar III collection, and said fees range from a couple of thousand to be at a store hosting all day — tweeting and uploading images to Instagram throughout — up to about $50,000 for a collaboration deal with a brand, which she declined to name (she is, however, in talks to work with them again).

Coach has been at the forefront of collaborating with bloggers — in late 2009, it became one of the first to enlist bloggers to design, style, blog and even appear in its ad campaigns such as Leandra Medine, Hanneli Mustaparta, Into the Gloss’ Emily Weiss and The Glamourai’s Kelly Framel.

“We see bloggers as editors, influencers and entrepreneurs who reach a very specific and unique audience,” said David Duplantis, Coach’s executive vice president of global Web and digital media. “We find great value in working with those who are relevant to our brand, and are willing to pay fairly for projects.”

Duplantis believes the relationship between brand and blogger to be symbiotic — and it’s not just about the monetary reward. So, although the brand benefits by reaching a blogger’s audience in addition to its own, the blogger also benefits from the cachet of working with a brand as large and influential as Coach.

“We don’t look at our blogger partnerships as advertising. For us, this is about content creation and the opportunity to work with a very creative, vibrant community,” Duplantis added. “It’s incredibly valuable to work with bloggers. They are creating so much interesting content, we’d be remiss not to partner with them. It’s fascinating to see how they interpret our brand through their eyes.”

More recently, Coach has begun to work with lesser-known bloggers, opting to discover online talent still relatively unknown to the fashion masses and introducing them to its audience in place of established bloggers — such as Downtown from Behind (a series with photographs of subjects riding their bicycles from behind — all snapped in downtown Manhattan) and Things Organized Neatly (recent college graduate Austin Radcliffe’s blog of aesthetically pleasing, highly organized imagery). Coach remains just as interested in working with established digital influencers (it will reveal projects with several well-known bloggers in the near future), and Duplantis added that as long as a blogger is original, creative and has a genuine affection for the brand, it doesn’t matter if they’ve been blogging for one month or five years.

Robinovitz, who represents Song, The Glamourai’s Framel, Ramshackle Glam’s Jordan Reid and From Me to You’s Jamie Beck, believes the role of blogger partnerships is increasingly important industry-wide. More and more brands appear to agree.

BCBG Max Azria Group tapped The Glamourai’s Framel to style the BCBGMaxAzria ready-to-wear resort presentation on Wednesday and Thursday — the first time the brand has ever worked with a blogger in this capacity. According to BCBG Max Azria Group creative director Lubov Azria, Framel was paid a fee of $5,000 for her role as a stylist, which includes a tie-in with the brand and Framel’s respective Twitter, blog, Facebook and Instagram posts (the number of posts wasn’t specified, as Azria wanted the partnership to be “natural”).

“We took a fresh approach to styling resort this season,” Azria said. “Kelly has a chic, effortless sensibility and approach to fashion that is very BCBG — and clearly she’s very influential. We’re just obsessed with her.”

A BCBG-clad Framel will be on hand during one of the days of the presentation for several hours to walk editors through the collection, and she also attended the CFDA Awards Monday night with Azria and model Selita Ebanks. Tonight, she will co-host an editor and blogger dinner in New York City — wearing the brand, of course.

“I worked in the fashion industry for years before founding my site, and I appreciate when brands see that I have more to offer than a p.r. gimmick,” Framel told WWD.

Late last month, Dove Hair revealed it inked a one-year deal with Ramshackle Glam’s Reid, the brand’s first ambassador. In her role, Reid will cross promote and interact with fans on her blog and on Dove’s Facebook page, as well as test new products, attend events on behalf of the brand and even host reader giveaways. According to her blog, she will serve as a “real world” counterpoint to the celebrity stylist who works with the brand, Mark Townsend.
- WWD.COM

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