Anna Wintour (February 2012 - September 2014) - Page 35 - the Fashion Spot
 
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11-03-2013
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maybe (stupid) question, but does she have a stylist or someone who helps her with her clothes? or do you think she puts everything together on her own?

 
12-03-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinksofa View Post
maybe (stupid) question, but does she have a stylist or someone who helps her with her clothes? or do you think she puts everything together on her own?
I don't see how she could possibly do it all herself- I know she has makeup and hair done at home after her tennis session in the morning...Just imagine how many outfits she would need for the fashion week trips and all the parties...

 
12-03-2013
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yes we never know her style assistant,what is her/his name?It must be so hard to do that since she really has a solid yet wired taste!!!

 
13-03-2013
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Condé Nast Adds to Job of Longtime Vogue Editor
Quote:
Anna Wintour, who will mark her 25th anniversary as the editor of Vogue magazine this summer and who for the last year has been the subject of persistent rumors about a possible ambassadorship in the Obama administration, is taking on the additional role of artistic director of Condé Nast, the company plans to announce on Wednesday.

The move up into Condé Nast’s executive ranks, while ending speculation that Ms. Wintour, 63, was leaving the company or retiring from Vogue, also establishes her as one of the most powerful women in magazine publishing. Martha Nelson, who was promoted to editor in chief of Time Inc. recently, is in that group.

In her new role, Ms. Wintour is assuming some of the responsibilities once held by S. I. Newhouse Jr., who has controlled the editorial management of Condé Nast as chairman for more than three decades.

Beginning last fall, Mr. Newhouse, 85, quietly yielded his day-to-day involvement in the magazines and transitioned from the executive suite on the 11th floor of Condé Nast’s headquarters in Times Square to an office on the sixth floor, where members of the Newhouse family manage the parent company, Advance Publications.

“Si Newhouse leaves a void, inevitably,” Charles H. Townsend, the chief executive of Condé Nast, said in a joint interview with Ms. Wintour on Tuesday. “Anna, without even having to think twice about it, is the most qualified person to pick up that torch and carry it into the future.”

While Condé Nast has had several editorial directors in its history, including Alexander Liberman beginning in the 1960s, and James Truman in the 1990s, the role of artistic director is new. It was created in part to keep Ms. Wintour at the company, Mr. Townsend said. Thomas J. Wallace, who became editorial director in 2005, will retain that position, focusing on operations and developing new platforms for content.

“I would go to great distances to avoid losing Anna, particularly in the prime of her career,” Mr. Townsend said.

Ms. Wintour said that she viewed the role as “almost like being a one-person consulting firm,” advising other editors on ideas or directions they might take with their brands, much as she has expanded the purview of Vogue.

She will remain the editor of Vogue and the editorial director of Teen Vogue, in addition to assuming broader creative duties throughout the company, and having a say in its expanding portfolio of platforms, including the recent development of an entertainment division.

“It is something I do a lot anyway in my role at Vogue,” Ms. Wintour said.

“I advise all sorts of people in the outside world, and really, I see this as an extension of what I am doing, but on a broader scale.”

Ms. Wintour, like Mr. Newhouse, will be a sounding board for editors. But it was unclear whether she will take on a role he relished over the years, vetting the monthly covers of glossy magazines like Vanity Fair, GQ, Glamour and Architectural Digest.

Like all publishing businesses, Condé Nast has struggled with the continuing pressures of a plodding economic recovery and the loss of readership and advertising to the Web.

In 2009, the company closed Gourmet and three other publications. Fashion magazines in particular have cut lavish budgets for photo shoots, car services and editorial production, a hallmark of Condé Nast publications. Time Warner’s recently announced plan to spin off Time Inc. underscores what will probably be further cost-cutting and commodification of magazines in general.

“Without this statement,” Mr. Townsend said of Ms. Wintour’s new role, “I fear we could end up looking more like Time Inc. I don’t want to look like a gray-suited business.”

Last year, Ms. Wintour, who raised millions of dollars for President Obama’s re-election, was reported to be lobbying for the position of ambassador to Britain. Ms. Wintour said she was not disappointed that she was not selected, “since the talks were purely in the press.”

“It was an honor to work for President Obama,” she said. “I loved supporting him and getting to know the people working on the campaign, but there was never a long-term discussion about anything.”

Ms. Wintour said it was too soon to say what she would do as artistic director, and the company took pains to say it was a different job. It may be closest to that of Mr. Liberman, who brought Ms. Wintour to Condé Nast and who largely shaped the image and culture of the company.

Part of her job will be to look for new talent and to reinforce aesthetics.

“It isn’t about a machine or an iPhone or an iPad,” Ms. Wintour said. “It’s about people.”

Diane von Furstenberg, who has worked closely with Ms. Wintour as the president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, said that her reputation as a chilly personality is at odds with her accomplishments. Ms. Wintour inspired the book and movie “The Devil Wears Prada.”

“She can be so intimidating and all of that, but she is just so incredibly positive,” Ms. von Furstenberg said. “And she makes things happen. She’s tough, but she’s not cruel.”

David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, which is published by Condé Nast, said that he would not hesitate to ask for Ms. Wintour’s opinion.

“I don’t expect Anna to be picking the cartoons or directing our war coverage,” he said. “But I have asked her advice numerous times and always been grateful for it. She’s a great editor. Period.”
nytimes.com

 
13-03-2013
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^ Good for her. I must admit my heart stopped while reading the title because I thought they were announcing her quitting!

 
 
13-03-2013
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Yes good for her, but i cant help and wonder if this means in near future she will leave Vogue and dedicate more to the new role, i wont be surprised, but hopefully not for a long while yet.

 
13-03-2013
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Another article from New York Magazine:

Quote:

Anna Wintour Got a Big Promotion!
BY CHARLOTTE COWLES


After all the noise about Anna Wintour landing an ambassador job turned out to be just that — noise — it should come as no surprise that she's focusing on her current empire instead of politics. On Wednesday, Condé Nast will announce Wintour's promotion to the new role of artistic director at the company, the Times reports. She'll remain the editor of Vogue and the editorial director of Teen Vogue as she assumes her new responsibilities.

The artistic director job was created specially for Wintour, although it includes many aspects of what Si Newhouse, Condé's chairman, used to oversee more actively. (Newhouse, who is 85, has recently begun to scale back on his presence in the company.) Condé CEO Charles Townsend says Wintour is a fitting heir for those responsibilities: "Si Newhouse leaves a void, inevitably," he told the Times. "Anna, without even having to think twice about it, is the most qualified person to pick up that torch and carry it into the future." He adds, “I would go to great distances to avoid losing Anna, particularly in the prime of her career." The prime! Ambassador, shmambassador.

So what exactly will Wintour's new position entail? She says she views the job as "almost like being a one-person consulting firm," which is something she does lots of already. “I advise all sorts of people in the outside world, and really, I see this as an extension of what I am doing, but on a broader scale,” she says. Basically, she'll be a catch-all branding counselor of sorts for any editor who needs advice. As for Condé's long-term digital plan — well, she didn't have much to say about that. "It isn’t about a machine or an iPhone or an iPad,” Wintour told the Times. “It’s about people."

As for the most concise statement about Wintour's new gig, that prize goes to New Yorker editor David Remnick: "I don’t expect Anna to be picking the cartoons or directing our war coverage," he says. "But I have asked her advice numerous times and always been grateful for it. She’s a great editor. Period." Congrats to you, Anna. You've certainly earned it.
nymag.com

http://nymag.com/thecut/2013/03/anna...=twitter_nymag

 
14-03-2013
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Another fantastic article, i recommend everyone to read it. I think even if she leaves Vogue, which looks likely to me after reading this, she will remain a CN legend;

Quote:
Anna Wintour Expands Reach at Condé Nast
By Erik Maza

Denizens of 4 Times Square woke up Wednesday to discover they had a new pope — and it wasn’t Francis I.

For the last several years, Condé Nast has been preparing for when chairman S.I. Newhouse Jr., now 85, would wind down his duties at the publishing group. For a company whose prestige and reputation are so closely tied to one man, the question of who would follow in his footsteps has all the gravity of a papal succession.
At a time when other companies are shrinking or being spun off, the preservation of Condé’s image was all the more important. The executives in place are all money guys — consumer marketers, really, and even by their admission, unlikely to inspire the cult of personality Newhouse stoked for decades. Condé was in need of its own version of the Columbia Pictures’ logo, someone to symbolize the culture of the place as much as the image it sought to convey.


In Condé’s view, there was no one better suited for that role than Anna Wintour, 63.

“She’s maybe the greatest marketer we have in this organization,” said chief executive officer Charles H. Townsend. “What she stands for is the epitome of what Condé stands for — her accomplishment, her success, her unyielding commitment to excellence and content creation.”

As WWD reported in December, Condé executives had been looking to elevate Wintour to a larger corporate role. On Tuesday she was anointed artistic director, a newly created position that encompasses duties once held by Newhouse and, much earlier on, by Alexander Liberman, the group’s legendary editorial director. In theory, the role grants her enormous influence over the editorial direction of the company’s magazines, from The New Yorker to Vanity Fair.

What does that mean in practice? That was the question bouncing around 4 Times Square Wednesday. Wintour’s coronation was received by some as a positive development for a company that some believe had lost its shimmer as Newhouse became less involved. But there was also confusion. Save for Vanity Fair editor in chief Graydon Carter and New Yorker editor David Remnick, Condé’s not in the habit of consulting with top editors about major institutional announcements like this. So when the official statement went out, it raised more questions than answers. Will Wintour attend print order previews? How would she divide her loyalties between Vogue and the magazines she’s ostensibly been tasked with advising?

“We have a lot of autonomy as editors,” one source said. “And certainly while working under [Thomas J. Wallace, editorial director]. No one wants to see that go away. People need a little more clarity.”


“We’re not all friends here,” said another insider. “This is a competitive building. We use the same photographers. We compete for the same celebrities. This will be a gradual process as she finds areas she’d like to investigate. Why else would she take the job if she wasn’t going to do things with it?”

Wintour has been part of the Condé family since 1983, rising from editor in chief of British Vogue to the company’s shiniest star. In that time, she’s also broadly expanded the definition of editor in chief. She is the ultimate brand manager — there are Vogue-branded events, documentaries, online encyclopedias — and a power broker, one of the most influential forces in fashion, with a say on everything from the stewardship of the world’s oldest fashion houses to the industry’s place in the American economy.

What was there to do after all that? Last year, the question came up during a casual get-together with New York editor in chief Adam Moss. They were both restless, eager to do something else. But Wintour came down on the side of pragmatism, said sources familiar with their conversation. The minute she leaves Vogue, she told Moss, she would just go back to being another former editor.

One way to expand her circle of influence beyond fashion and media was politics. She campaigned and raised substantial sums for Barack Obama in 2008, and repeated her efforts in the last election cycle, hosting lavish fund-raisers in his honor. As the campaign was drawing to a close, she lobbied hard for one of the sought-after ambassadorships that are usually passed down to influential donors, such as Paris or London, several sources said.

“She already had this idea in her head that she was in a new stage in her life,” said an insider familiar with her thinking. “She was restless and she had a desire for a new adventure.”

For the last several years, Wintour’s been dogged by speculation about retirement — she’s been on the job for 25 years. But Condé seriously got the message as she stepped up her extracurricular efforts. With Newhouse playing a less prominent role in the company for the last year, there was also a leadership vacuum, and Condé risked tarnishing its image. Townsend, under particular pressure to not lose his marquee talent, started coming up with options. If she didn’t leave for an ambassadorship, it would have been something else, and that would have been an unmitigated mess.

“They don’t want her going anywhere else. If she had left, that would have been a disaster for [Townsend],” an insider said.

Last summer, Wintour signed a three-year contract that came with financial penalties if she left early. Though the possibility of a new corporate title had been discussed, by December no firm agreement had been reached.

Townsend confirmed he and Wintour had talked for over a year about expanding her purview but hadn’t come up with the right offer. There was talk of Wintour having oversight of some brands, but not all, according to sources. She had already played that role once in the past, overseeing editorial direction of several titles, not just Teen Vogue, but also Men’s Vogue and Vogue Living, two titles that were subsequently shuttered.

Townsend was aware of Wintour’s desire for a change, though they never discussed the possible diplomatic post.

“Twenty-five years is a long time,” he said. “I do think it’s almost the ideal moment to expand her horizons and maintain her enthusiasms for all the things this company stands for.”

At the same time, Townsend felt he needed a creative leader to “ensure the preservation of the [Condé] culture” in the wake of Newhouse’s diminishing role.

In January, Wintour’s path to an ambassadorship looked narrower — other more prominent donors, with experience in finance and foreign policy, had better chances. Townsend said while attending a session during the WWD CEO Summit in early January with Karl Lagerfeld that he came up with the right offer for Wintour. He saw her as playing a similar role to Lagerfeld at Chanel: brand Condé’s most visible ambassador.


“We picked up the conversation that week,” Townsend said. Then, he brought up the ambassadorship, he said, for the first time. “I said, ‘I really feel this is the right role. We’ve been looking for the right handle. The company genuinely believes it.’” But, he warned, ‘‘If you accept it, you can’t then come and tell me you’ve accepted at a later date a job as an ambassador.’”

Townsend said the new title ensures Wintour won’t entertain other distractions, political or not.

“It’s not just a title. It’s not just to entice her to stay. The equation is pretty clear. Yes, I do want her to spend her glory years at Condé Nast,” he said.

The role of artistic director is somewhat unprecedented. While Liberman had a say in every major decision, including who got to replace Grace Mirabella at Vogue, Townsend emphasized Wintour will not have direct oversight over editors and publishers — they’ll continue to report to him. Instead, she’ll operate as an executive sounding board, a role she already plays in some capacity for the company’s creative class, and for fashion’s most important executives. He compared her duties to Newhouse’s in the later years. “He was not picking covers, changing cover lines and shaping content. He was really available as a constant source confirmation and commitment to excellence,” Townsend said.

Will she have a say in hiring and firing, like Liberman did? Townsend said he’d seek Wintour’s counsel on those kinds of questions. What about editorial director Tom Wallace? He will continue to be involved in managing operational problems at the magazines, said Townsend. While the description may be vague, Wintour’s arrival could give Wallace a powerful ally in fighting the editorial side’s corner.

Though Condé is eager to underscore Wintour’s continuing role as editor in chief of its chief money machine, Vogue, few within 4 Times Square believe she can carry on that job at the same pace while also playing the part of roving ambassador. More likely is that her deputies, including whomever fills the opening left by the retirement of longtime managing editor Laurie Jones, will come under greater pressure to handle the day-to-day responsibilities at the magazine. One of her most trusted aides, Sally Singer, returned to the magazine as creative director, digital, after her unsuccessful stint at T: The New York Times Style Magazine, and was a ubiquitous front-row presence during fashion week.

Wintour will have a chance to address her new subjects Friday at an all-hands-on-deck meeting of editors in chief that had been scheduled prior to the announcement of her new title.

Perhaps many of the raging questions of what she will do as artistic director will be answered then. Or perhaps not. Regardless, Wintour is clearly Condé’s star — and Townsend is unlikely to do anything to tarnish it.

“It gives her a very wide berth to do whatever she wants,” an insider said of the new job. “And financial security that goes beyond anything we can imagine. She’s been taken care, in the old way Condé used to be.”

Wintour declined comment.
wwd.com

 
14-03-2013
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Thanks Ms D- very good article...it should be interesting to see how this all comes together...

 
16-03-2013
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^indeed....

 
16-03-2013
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whoa, do you really think she will leave vogue?!? i always thought fashion is her one and only (besides tennis, maybe )
... but its so crazy: i think everybody would be more than happy to have her postion and her power - which goes far beyond the fashion world - but she just goes on and on! i mean, shes in her 60s, she also could buy herself a beautiful house at an island and enjoy the rest of her life!

 
18-03-2013
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Quote:
How Kanye West is 'begging' friend Anna Wintour to put girlfriend Kim Kardashian on the cover of Vogue

Kayne West is apparently trying to help Kim Kardashian land a spot on the cover of Vogue.
A source told Star Magazine that the rapper is 'practically begging' the title's editor, Anna Wintour, to feature his five-months'-pregnant girlfriend.
But to date, his pleas have not worked.
Indeed it was previously reported that Ms Wintour said that Kim would grace the front of her magazine 'over her dead body.'
An insider said to Star that while Ms Wintour thinks Kayne is 'terrific', she declared Kim to be 'the worst thing since socks and sandals'.
Kim and Ms Wintour's supposed feud has been well-documented.
Last year it was claimed that Kim, 32, was banned from the Met Gala following an edict from the Vogue honcho.
While Kayne attended the New York party in a bow-tie and suit, his girlfriend stayed at home in LA and tweeted about the star-studded event instead.
A source told Radar Online at the time: 'Anna hates Kim. Why would she be invited to the event?
'It is all the biggest stars in the world and Kim doesn’t fit that bill at all.
'The Met Gala is $25,000 a ticket, but Kim couldn't even buy her way in.'
However, with Kayne set to perform at the this year's punk-themed May 6 event, it is likely that Kim will finally score a plus one spot.
According to Star, Ms Wintour also refused to acknowledge Kim at New York Fashion Week last September.
But despite the alleged animosity, Kanye appears to have no qualms about maintaining a friendship with Ms Wintour, especially given that he runs a high-end fashion label.
dailymail.co.uk

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18-03-2013
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^ Good! I hope Anna sends her a dead fish wrapped in newspaper...

 
29-03-2013
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WOW she was once the girlfriend of Christopher Hitchens...! That seems so out of left field

 
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^that's funny, is kayne still running his so called "high-fashion" label? I thought they closed it down actually...

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