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10-09-2007
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Glenda Bailey
current editor-in-chief of bazaar

i just found one pic of her(the second person from the left)



style.com


feel free to discuss her,guys

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13-11-2007
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so no one is interested in her???

btw...which issue was her first full-edited issue?anyone knows???from 2002??

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13-11-2007
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I like Bazaar (although I despise their cover choices) but I find Glenda rather uninteresting.. Nothing about her style or personality stands out. She edits a fairly interesting magazine and that's it.

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14-11-2007
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i don't know that much about her...
i could even say : i know NOTHING about her...
more... since when did she take h&b???
oh wait i've seen her... or maybe i'm wrong... but i think i know who she is...
she loved paris and all the flowers for ss08...

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14-11-2007
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I don't know much about her, but I like the magazine.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BerlinRocks View Post
more... since when did she take h&b???

A.D.C. answered this question in the magazine forum....her first full-edited issue was 2002 feb with gisele on the cover.....well...i saw the 2002 jan issue yesterday...it was katherine betts's last issue..well..i should buy it

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26-05-2008
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an old article,from jyanet.com

Quote:
Welcome back, Harper’s Bazaar


Harper's Bazaar's redesign, predicted by the author, comes early with a new editor-in-chief whose mission is to raise circulation while redefining its brand
Jack Yan

TWO of my predictions came true this year. One was that Harper’s Bazaar, with its February 2000-launched masthead, would not do too well. That led to the news that editor-in-chief Kate Betts would not have her contract renewed. The second, which I committed to print in Visual Arts Trends early last year, has come early: that Harper’s Bazaar would require a redesign because the 2000 effort wouldn’t last.
I predicted the latter for 2003, but with the changes made by new editor-in-chief Glenda Bailey, there is a new Bazaar. As with February 2000, Gwyneth Paltrow is on the cover (an actress I declined to put on Lucire’s recently; let the American media champion their Gwyn). But we see the welcome return of the original masthead, in the HTF Didot typeface, gracing (is there a better present participle here?) the cover.
I must have given about 12 or more lectures since February 2000 on the faults of the "other" masthead, which must now rank as a black-sheep version or a bad experiment. But in each lecture I gave the designer the benefit of the doubt. ‘Maybe he’s trying to redefine the market-place.’ ‘It’ll give the magazine greater differentiation.’ But I always qualified it with, ‘It doesn’t say what the magazine truly is: establishment.’
Every student of typography will know two facts: one is that the selection of a typeface is partly subconscious, partly logical and partly competitive; the second is that typefaces convey the social position of the piece, determined by the reader’s upbringing and earlier influences. It is as much common typographic and design knowledge as the fact that Bill Cosby looks less menacing in his trademark woolen sweaters.
Still, if there weren’t failures then Harper’s Bazaar would never know it had once tried to push the envelope, to lead instead of following (even if the use of a modern typeface, such as HTF Didot, was established by the magazine’s legendary Ukrainian art director Alexey Brodovitch). That in itself is refreshing, even if the magazine paid for it with circulation and money, those determinants of an editor-in-chief, and, as it turned out, an art director’s careers.
But why was it such a bad idea? I’ve dealt with the design elsewhere but Harper’s Bazaar forgot that the visual expression of any product must match the product. Yes, Ms Betts did change the magazine after Liz Tilberis died; she had moved Bazaar on after Karin Upton Baker, then-editor of Harper’s Bazaar Australia, came in as a caretaker with the mission of keeping the Liz formula going. But she hadn’t revolutionized it. Harper’s Bazaar had a core readership that needed to grow. To get them, it packaged its product differently, but it was fundamentally the same—at least when it came to casual readers like me.
And it wasn’t that adventurous design-wise. The magazine didn’t suddenly go grunge. It wasn’t Ray Gun on steroids. No: it was well-ordered—which didn’t explain the godawful masthead and the choices of typeface.
In a recession, Harper’s Bazaar’s adventurous experiment would probably not go down that well, either. It’s like dressing sexy at a time when the mood is somber. It’s all right if you’re the Hilton sisters and terrorizing the social scene, but it’s not all right if you’re trying to be the grande dame as well. And that was where Bazaar was at: a brand undefined, through no fault of any one editor-in-chief or one art director, but the way things just didn’t gel.
Art direction of a magazine, like any other discipline, is one where identity and branding are paramount, along with the theories behind them: organizational vision, marketing strategy, typography, graphic design, image, marketing performance, tracking. Bazaar expressed this more than any other.
And of the new Bazaar? The story is not unlike that of Colombe Pringle’s last Vogue Paris. The French edition went avant-garde for 1994, using Akzidenz-Grotesk and Garamond—which, incidentally, are typefaces that the new Harper’s Bazaar has adopted along with Linotype Didot (right)—using asymmetric layouts, white space and other DTP-layout-inspired features. It didn’t work, even if the magazine looked cooler than it ever did with the staid and same-again-in-fashion Berthold Bodoni Antiqua. Pringle found herself out of a job and Joan Juliet Buck and Donald Schneider came in. The magazine promptly went back to the pre-1994 look. In fact, it probably went further back in time, looking duller than it ever did artistically. I didn’t buy any more after that, but maybe the experiment in design mediocrity worked: (a) we are about fashion so look at the photos because the Newhouses paid a lot for them; (b) we are the establishment and now we look it.
So Bailey’s Bazaar is of that ilk: a safely, safely trek to more evocative times, using the Brodovitch-inspired, Hoefler-digitalized masthead, more conservative type choices and instant familiarity. Nothing exciting, artistically, but Lucire’s fount of fashion features, Phillip Johnson, gave it the thumbs-up when I spoke with him today. It works, because it’s Bazaar: a return to what it knows and hopefully, the Avis rule will apply: ‘We try harder.’
The cover works. Ms Paltrow looks about as characterful as a Chinese rice pudding but she’s helped by the split-line Linotype Didot Italic text—not to everyone’s tastes but the message to me is: the type style you’re so familiar with is back. It’s the second rule and there are enough readers who understand it.
It looks establishment. Its features hold the institution together, with a bit of celeb-kissing thrown in. (Who doesn’t kiss celebs now in that market?) There are beautiful photos by Terry Richardson. And a layout that obeys the rules because Harper’s Bazaar is about defining the rules. (I know, I know: ‘We don’t dictate!’ But we on the fringes in the independent press think you do.)
Content-wise, there’s less dumbing-down. The articulate Georgina Howell looks at Frida Kahlo: for great research, it’s hard to go past Georgina. The type is Adobe Garamond; ITC New Baskerville, used in the Betts days, takes up more room. (New Baskerville was the smart-*** student’s typeface of choice when I was at law school: it made your papers look bulkier because you’d get fewer characters per line. Oh, I was the smart-*** law student.) If you have a lot of pages and it’s in Garamond, it’s bound to be meaty. Let’s face it: people don’t really want dumbing-down. Not at $3·50 per issue. And right now, we want to be a little safer and not sense that we’re under siege, which is how the east coast still feels.
In a recession, and in a post-September 11 world, when we look to the past with even rosier glasses, when Hovis Bread and Dvorak’s New World Symphony go together with sepia tones, familiarity mightn’t breed contempt—it might breed sales. Hearst, Bazaar’s publisher, is betting on it.

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26-05-2008
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Thanks for the article kasper, it was really interesting.

I remember that Glenda Bailey came over from US Marie Claire I think, and even before that she was an editor in the UK... I believe also at Marie Claire but I may be wrong. I recall reading that she did a lot of good for that magazine won a lot of praise and awards there... I'm a bit sketchy on the details, I'll try to come back with more

Personality wise she's a bit of a non-entity for me though, but I don't think she intends to really exert her identity as much as other others.

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26-05-2008
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There's not much out there about her and she doesn't seem to pose for pictures much. But the following is good information about her and her career.


I found this from Hearst Publications ... obviously a press release:






Glenda Bailey
Editor-In-Chief
Harper's Bazaar


Glenda Bailey became editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar in May 2001. Prior to joining Bazaar, she served in the same capacity at the U.S. edition of Marie Claire beginning in June 1996. In the nearly five years under her editorship, Bailey built Marie Claire into the best-selling fashion magazine on the newsstand and one of the fastest growing magazines in the industry.

Bailey brings her in-depth knowledge of fashion and trends, along with a sense of originality and personality, to the magazine she edits. She is not afraid to be controversial and knows that success relies on unique ideas –and making them happen.

While at Marie Claire, Bailey created many unique features and initiatives, including the cover celebrity “challenge”, where celebrities agree to do such amazing tasks as live in an igloo, travel to Africa, and survive in the desert in lieu of giving a typical boring interview. In addition, Bailey was instrumental in producing Marie Claire's What Women Want event in November 1999. This groundbreaking event brought together the likes of Oprah Winfrey, Meryl Streep, Sarah Jessica Parker and Trudie Styler to share their experience and raise awareness on issues affecting women today.
Bailey has received many industry accolades during her career. In March 2001, she was named “Editor of the Year” by Adweek for her “innovative, expansive and democratic approach” to editing a fashion and beauty magazine. In addition, during Bailey’s tenure as editor, Marie Claire was named one of Adweek's Top 10 Hottest Magazines in 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000 and as Best Publication by industry newsletter The Delaney Report in 2000. The title was one of Capell's Circulation Report's Best Circulation Performers in 1998. During her time at Marie Claire, the title was the recipient of the Community Action Network Award in 1998 and 1999 for its feature stories on women and AIDS and genital mutilation and was the first magazine in the United States to be given the Amnesty International Award for Journalism in September 1997.

Prior to her move to New York, Bailey served as the Editor of British Marie Claire, which she launched in 1988. Under her editorship, Marie Claire became the biggest-selling fashion magazine in the United Kingdom and earned virtually every publishing honor. In the eight years she was Editor-in-Chief of British Marie Claire, she won three Magazine Editor of the Year Awards, five Magazine of the Year Awards and two Amnesty International Awards. In August 1995, she was made International Editorial Consultant of all 26 editions of Marie Claire. Born in Derbyshire, England, Bailey earned a degree in fashion design from Kingston University.

Before embarking on her career in magazine publishing, in 1983 Bailey produced a collection for Guisi Slaverio in Italy. She then became editor of Honey in 1986 and went on to successfully launch Folio, a quarterly fashion magazine before being appointed as launch editor of the British Marie Claire.

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Last edited by BetteT; 26-05-2008 at 08:43 PM.
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26-05-2008
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And I got this from Forbes:

Most Powerful Fashion Editors
Glenda Bailey
Editor-in-Chief, Harper's Bazaar
Circulation: 722,359
Bailey became top editor of Bazaar in May 2001, fresh off her highly successful reign at Marie Claire. She had a lot to prove, taking over from beloved editor Liz Tilberis, who died of cancer in 1999. (Kate Betts had a short tenure in between.) But since Bailey began, there has been a 30% increase in newsstand sales. She created the two-cover concept for Bazaar: one on front, another on back. While she doesn't have quite Wintour's cachet, her Harper's Bazaar is more approachable and more accessible than its rival--as Bailey is said to be.

© AP

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26-05-2008
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And here's an interview last Sept. that she did with Media Bistro:


What's the best part of Fashion Week?
The clothes. It's all about what's new.

And the worst part?
Waiting for the shows to begin. Sometimes shows don't start for an hour. In Europe, they can be two hours late.

To the outsider looking in the fashion industry is like some exotic tribe that has its own idiosyncratic customs and mores. What's the protocol when it comes to wearing something from the designer to their show. Is that just the province of celebrities and socialites?
I don't know how anyone would find the time to change. (Laughs). The mind boggles. It's like being Superman and changing in a telephone kiosk in Bryant Park. I certainly don't have the chance to change for a show. I have such a passion for fashion. I love shopping -- it's my hobby as well as my job. I relish getting the clothes and putting my looks together in what I think is my personal style for the season.

Do you have a Fashion Week uniform? How do you style yourself for the shows?
I really don't like to wear one designer head-to-toe. That says everything about the designer and very little about me. I try to buy clothes that complement my existing wardrobe. I try to practice what I preach which is personal style and updating your look every season. The days are over, thank goodness, where you rushed out and bought everything new. It's all about expressing yourself and putting together looks that you love with [clothes] that you have worn forever.

Ever leave a show because you didn't like your seat?
[Laughs] I've only ever sat in the front row, so no... [Laughs] This is a very serious business. I'm there because I represent Harper's Bazaar and I'm looking for the very, very best fashion that my readers are going to want to know about. I take that job very seriously; I don't take myself very seriously.

Did you always want to be a fashion editor?
I always loved fashion and I always loved magazines. I studied fashion design and I realized I wasn't going to be the next Karl Lagerfeld and I wanted to be really good in an area. I was really fortunate enough to do a placement [internship] at IPC Magazines back in England and then I did my dissertation on their magazines. I was very strategic about my career in magazines.

What magazines do you read?
I've always read so many magazines. I collect magazines. I've got some really great issues of Jil. It was a French magazine edited by Babeth Dijan. The first three issues of Italian Elle are so well done... I love looking at all sorts of magazines, from Popular Mechanics to Pop magazine, if they're really well-edited.

You actually read Popular Mechanics?
Yes -- which is particularly interesting because I don't drive. I love the art of editing. You don't have to know about the subject to know whether something is well done.

What's a typical day like for you?
During the shows, it's quite an early start with shows starting at 9 o' clock and 8 o'clock for previews. Then there are presentations and dinners after all that. It's even more intense in Europe because you sometimes find yourself out until 1 or 2 in the morning. If you haven't got an early show in the morning, you're inevitably trying to see the designers or presidents [of companies] to catch up on the business. Back in the office my day could be described as "Yes, no, yes, yes, no" -- because that's what you do when you're an editor. That's your job.

There's been so much about fashion in recent years in pop culture from The Devil Wears Prada and Project Runway to Ugly Betty. How do you think they stack up against the real thing?
Anything that gets the general public more aware of the fashion industry and creates more excitement about it I'm all for. In the same way, one of the reasons for our success at Harper's Bazaar is that we really embrace popular culture. We put fashion in context of popular culture. It's really quite unique positioning in our market. In the September issue Chloe Sevigny in the rehab story totally reflects what people are talking about. [EDITOR'S NOTE: the actress is depicted in a fashion spread as a starlet in rehab].

How did the idea for that photo shoot come about?
The idea was mine. It came about a very long time ago at the shows as more and more celebrities were going to rehab. That's what people were talking about so I thought how great it would be to put it into context of a fashion story. It was about six months ago and we were waiting for Chloe to be free. I'm very proud of the results because I thought she really got the spirit of the piece.

You've shown yourself to have an uncanny knack with your timing for celebrity covers. You put Paris and Nicole on your cover and featured them in a fashion story as fugitives just as Hilton was sentenced to jail, and this month you've got Kate Hudson when the tabloids are speculating on what role her breakup with Owen Wilson might have played in his recent troubles. Do you have ESP? How do you pick your stars for your covers?
[Laughs]. We're interested in the stars everyone is talking about. As you mentioned about Paris and Nicole, we shot that in early February and it was our June cover. Paris went to prison on our on sale day. I trust my instincts. I always wanted to be innovative and inventive -- not just to report on what's going on, but to create ideas that people talked about.

Like having the Simpsons go to Paris?
Laura Brown, our celebrity and special projects editor, and Stephen Gan, who is our creative director, were talking about the Simpsons movie and they had the idea of sending the Simpsons to Paris. So we concocted a storyline that was executed really well by Elizabeth Hummer, our design director.


You can't deny the influence that Paris, Britney -- and Lindsay -- have had on fashion.

Which celebrities have sold the best for Bazaar?
They've all done very, very well. It's really hard to pick one or two out. Jennifer Aniston sells really, really well. Indeed so did Madonna, Katie Holmes, Demi...

Which was the best selling one?
It's probably Jennifer Aniston. That sold incredibly well. So did Ashley Olsen -- her first fashion magazine cover. That's something else I'm very proud of -- I'm not afraid to give somebody her first cover. I gave Sarah Jessica Parker her first cover and Teri Hatcher. It's timing. It's all about the right idea at the right time.

Have you had a disappointing celebrity cover?
No. We were fortunate enough to win the ASME award for best [celebrity] cover [in 2006 for the January issue] and that was Julianne Moore and she's not known for being a newsstand success. What I loved about that cover is we even covered her face -- which is something you're not supposed to do and it was all green, which is also not successful with a cover. Obviously that sold very well. Often you see a list of people who don't sell very well. I would just say to every editor it's whether the person is right for that particular magazine and the timing is right.

Your pregnant Britney Spears cover [in August 2006] was named one of AdAge's Ten Best. Would you put her on the cover given what's become of her now?
Again, it has to do with the right timing and the right idea.

Britney, Paris, and girls like them occupy a curious position in fashion. What role do they play in fashion? They're certainly not icons -- or are they?
You can't deny the influence that Paris, Britney -- and Lindsay -- have had on fashion. One of our best sellers of all time was Ashley Olsen. What's exciting about that is that I love that fashion can come from the street, it can come from celebrities. Generally, it's coming from the culture.

So it's all good -- reality stars as models or designers, bad girls as fashion leaders, and lower priced lines from stores like Target and Kohl's that have made fashion much more accessible and less elitist. Ever think fashion has become too egalitarian?
Our job as editors is to find the very best fashion at the best price. The more variety there is, the better it is for the reader.


Have you ever been approached to do a reality show? Would you ever open up the Bazaar offices for television?
People have asked but the answer has been "no."

Has the diva factor played up on shows like Project Runway given fashionistas a bad rap as super bitchy, overly competitive strivers?
Fashion is the entertainment industry and attracts lots of characters. Long may that continue.

Anna Wintour, the editor of your rival publication, is very much a "celebrity editor." You seem to keep a much lower profile. How do you see yourself in that context?
[Laughs] I just get on with my job.

Okay, let's have the real story between the rivalry between Vogue and Bazaar. How would you describe the rivalry between the two magazines?
I don't think there is [a rivalry]. I'm very fortunate that my competitors are really good at their jobs and that's good because competition is the thing that gets us all really excited. Everyone in this area of the industry has their particular market, which they serve very well.

You really don't think there's a rivalry between Vogue and Bazaar?
No. They're good at what they do and I'd like to think the reason why we've become so successful is because we hopefully provide a magazine for women who love fashion and beauty, that have a sense of humor, that love entertainment, and that want to see popular culture reflected on our pages. I think the biggest reason Bazaar is a success is because of all the franchises we have. You mentioned you liked 'Fabulous at Any Age' -- that's just one of many franchises I either brought back or created. Whether it's 'Smart Shopping' or 'Personal Style' or 'What's In, What's Out,' these are all areas of the magazine the reader enjoys or comes back to every single month. That's something that's happened over the last five years. That's really set us apart from our competitors. So often with fashion magazines they take themselves very seriously and it's often about head to toe a particular designer. I think it's very important to have the very best fashion in Bazaar and I take that job seriously. We work with the very best photographers and stylists in the world. We have these beautiful aspirational images so people can dream, but at the same time we also know that even the most fashionable, knowledgeable woman wants ideas.

What has been your greatest contribution to Bazaar?
It's what I've just been saying. The first thing I did with Stephen Gan when we took over was to put the logo back, and from then on it was a question of building up franchises which people could enjoy every month at the same time creating "talk about" features that were unique in a fashion magazine.

What are the qualities you look for when you're hiring someone regardless of position?
They have to have a sense of humor. They have to have original ideas. I think there is way too much magazine fodder out there which is very boring. I get bored very easily.

How would you say you've gotten to where you are?
Hard work and good shoes.

What do you see yourself doing five years from now?
I've learned that life happens when you're making other plans.

Do you have a motto?
Good is the greatest enemy of great.

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Last edited by BetteT; 26-05-2008 at 09:13 PM.
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10-06-2008
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Source | WWD | June 9th

Quote:
Glenda Bailey turned up at Buckingham Palace Wednesday to receive her Officer of the Order of the British Empire honor from Queen Elizabeth II for services to British journalism and British fashion in the U.S. And the British editor in chief of Harper's Bazaar made sure she pledged her allegiance to England in sartorial terms on the day. While Bailey wore a navy blue Chanel suit to her investiture, she accessorized it with a Philip Treacy hat and a quilted Chanel bag printed with red and white stripes, so that it resembled a miniature Union Jack flag. "It all went so smoothly," said Bailey. "My family was in the front row. Her Majesty the Queen of course asked me about Harper's Bazaar." And naturally, being the editor of a fashion magazine, Bailey took note of what the rarely fashionable queen had on: "She was wearing a peppermint green shift dress, three strands of pearls and a brooch. I thanked her for being so elegant, and such an inspiration."

Bailey joins several British fashion figures who have been recognized by the British honors system in recent weeks — Stuart Rose received his knighthood last week and Nicole Farhi was made an honorary Commander of The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire last month.

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at a party for armani



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i just became interested in her after watching the fashion show. i really like harpers bazaar and i think she is doing a wonderful job!

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Quote:
Is Glenda Bailey Leaving Harper’s Bazaar?

There was a gossipy little item in this morning’s WWD suggesting Glenda Bailey is about to resign from Harper’s Bazaar. “Perhaps Harper’s Bazaar’s Glenda Bailey is on the way out?” writes reporter Zeke Turner. “She has a new counterpart on the business side, hard-charging Carol Smith, who can’t be happy with the magazine’s current numbers and will want to turn the magazine around right off the bat.”

We’ve heard similar rumors, but dismissed them as pure gossip. Turner does go on to cite an unnamed Bazaar source who reiterates that notion: “Glenda rumors come all the time, it’s just like the boy who cries wolf,” the source told WWD. “For the past two years, there have been Glenda rumors.”

We reached out to a Bazaar spokesperson for comment, and she said, “We don’t speculate on rumor, especially when it’s from unnamed sources.”

But as the Hearst-Hachette deal comes to fruition, there’s bound to be some major shakeups at the tower. So stay tuned.
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