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05-04-2012
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Pamela Golbin - Author, Curator-in-Chief of Les Arts Décoratifs





*Zimbio.com


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Louis Vuitton / Marc Jacobs: In Association with the Musee Des Arts Decoratifs, Paris by Pamela Golbin
This fascinating publication presents the roles two men have played in turning a small workshop in nineteenth-century Paris into one of the most successful and recognized brands in the world.

Known for both craftsmanship and must-have high design, Louis Vuitton the luxury house was started by its eponymous founder in 1854. The first half of this publication traces the innovations by Vuitton, who turned the little-known guild profession of emballeur (packer) into the foremost luxury trunk maker in Paris, with a clientele that included in his lifetime the French nobility as well as the elite of a prosperous empire. Prime and never-before-seen examples of Vuitton’s craftsmanship, along with the fashion that went into them, are the highlights of these chapters. The second half of the book examines the role of Marc Jacobs as Louis Vuitton’s creative director (since 1997), who took the Louis Vuitton house into a new era with a series of collaborations with artists and designers—such as Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Stephen Sprouse—as well as designing a line of highly successful and desired clothing for the company.

By examining two divergent but often similar careers one hundred years apart, Louis Vuitton / Marc Jacobs is not only a layered study of the evolution of a luxury brand in the past 150 years but also a celebration of technical and design innovations in the new century.
*Amazon.co.uk





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LOVE Magazine #6 by Liz Collins


*anders-soelvsten.blogspot.co.uk

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One of the greatest books I've ever bought!

Balenciaga Paris
by Pamela Golbin & Fabien Baron


*Frillr.com

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Quote:
Pamela Golbin: fashion’s language defined

Lola Saab speaks with Pamela Golbin, the Chief Curator of the Musée de la Mode et du Textile at the Louvre, on her series of fashion talks for the Alliance Française in New York featuring Tory Burch, Lorenz Bäumer and Oscar de la Renta
PHOTOGRAPHED BY JULIEN VALLÉ

THE FRENCH INSTITUTE Alliance Française in New York City provides a small audience the chance to attain a designer’s viewpoint of the fashion industry. Four hundred viewers at the Florence Gould Hall listen to a 45-minute talk between the designer as well as Pamela Golbin, the Chief Curator of the Musée de la Mode et du Textile at the Louvre Palace. Towards the end of the talk, the audience already feels as though they know the designers on a personal basis. To fill in the gaps for certain unclear aspects, guests have the opportunity to ask questions in a 10-minute Q&A session. Such talks permit the audience to get up close and personal with the faces behind the high-end brand names.
This year, the series of talks are held from March 16 to April 4, with three iconic figures from the fashion industry: Tory Burch, Lorenz Bäumer and Oscar de la Renta. We spoke to Golbin, the host of the Art de Vivre Fashion Talks, to attain her perspective about the fashion industry.

Lucire: How much does fashion mean to you?
Pamela Golbin: Well, it’s been my life for the past twenty years … since I started at the museum. I love fashion but what I love above all is people; fashion is a wonderful way to understand people. You know, everybody has to get dressed in the morning and it is a second skin. So whether you like it or not, it does say something about you and historically it puts things into context, into perspective and most importantly fashion is an industry. So it has an incredible dynamic, it is creative … it brings together so many different fields all at once. That has always been very exciting.

I’ve heard that fashion has always been a part of your life, as well as a part of your family’s life; could you tell us in what way?
Well, the women in the family have always been very strong and confident women. My paternal grandmother has been a client of haute couture since the 1920s; she is now 99 years old … so, it’s been a long time. My mother was also and still is quite a lover of fashion. But it’s always been a tool to better express yourself, so for me and my sister, it has always been a wonderful and creative tool as wel l… it’s been a very positive experience in our lives.

Between New York and Paris, are there any major differences in terms of fashion?
Oh … very much so and I would add Italy for that matter, Milano. You know, in Paris the haute couture system was born, and the fashion system was born, thanks to Charles Frederick Worth, an Englishman … What he brought to fashion was a creative aspect, he sold himself as an artist … So Paris has always been the creative centre of fashion.
When it comes to New York, it came much later, obviously … It is more product-based. Historically, in New York and in America the space was so much bigger and there were so many more people to dress. It’s a very different vision, it’s more about quantity. That doesn’t mean there is not quality, but from the offset it was how to dress the largest amount of people at the same time.
It is an ‘industry’, whereas Paris was more hand-based, it was an artisan who created it …
Historically, Italy has also been the centre of fabric and textiles since the 14th century. In each case, they have a very different point-of-view, but together they compose of the incredible industry that it is today: the fashion industry.

You have also published many books pertaining to a number of major designers including, Yves Saint Laurent, Valentino and Balenciaga. What is the main goal that you aim to achieve when you publish such books?
For the most part, these books come in conjunction with an exhibition … They are not exhibition catalogues, they are books … What really interests me is the person, what did this designer bring to the fashion language? I always think of fashion as a language: it is obviously not an oral language, but it is a very complex and sophisticated visual language with all of its rules …
Every designer has brought something to the table. And so when I start working on a designer, I always try to figure out what his or her specificity is. And then the work behind what they have done. What characterizes them? So all of these books, whether they are retrospectives or more thematically based, they are always about the person: what is that person’s voice?

You are currently hosting Art de Vivre Fashion Talks with such a great series of talks with designers including Tory Burch, Lorenz Bäumer and Oscar de la Renta. Can you give us your perspective on the talks as well as on the designers that will be featured this year?
I started these talks four years ago because I thought it would be wonderful to have a platform, kind of a master class, where informally I can invite designers from all fields to come and talk and just have a very close presence with an audience.
Over the years, I have been able to invite all sorts of designers, whether it was for menswear, Veronique Nichanian for Hermès, or shoe designer, Bruno Frisoni for his own line but also for Roger Vivier, as well as incredible women like Donna Karan and Diane Von Furstenberg.
And now, for this season I thought it was interesting to follow how to define a signature style. So these three designers are so different: I mean between Tory Burch and Oscar, they are two extremes in the fashion spectrum, but they each have found their place in this incredible industry and each have found their own iconic language. How to decipher that language? And of course Lorenz, who is not even in fashion but in jewellery design, has created incredible designs not only for Chanel first and now for Louis Vuitton … It was really how to convey what a signature style is and how each one found their own signature style in a very different manner.

How long does it take you to prepare these talks?
It takes very long because it is not just, ‘Oh, I can just go up and ask questions’. Forty-five minutes on stage to keep the tension … you know, these are people who give a lot of interviews to a lot of people and to be in front of four hundred guests is a lot. First of all, to be live, you can’t be cut, you can’t rewrite, you can’t control what comes out … to give that personal touch is a discipline … it is a lot of work.
I know some of the designers very well and I’ve followed and I’ve worked within different capacities so it’s much easier obviously, but there is always a lot of work that goes behind these talks, to make them seamless and seemingly easy.

Are you already preparing for next year’s Art de Vivre Fashion Talks?
Yes, you know, the calendar is filled … designers, unlike artists, have a lot of rendezvous with the press, with the clients, with production, that are very tight every year so their schedule is completely booked … We really have to work a year in advance to get them to come in.

Are there words of advice you can give those who want to dive into the fashion industry?
The word starts with a w: work … The parties and the red carpet are just not even one per cent of the work… to get there is just incredible … Talent is very important but perseverance and discipline are even more important to survive. It is not just a one-shot deal, you have to stick around. •
*lucire.com

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I'm sure there is an accompanying article with her LOVE Magazine portrait so I will either scan it or type it up later on.

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I really wish there was more coverage on her conversations with designers at FIAF, here are afew more she's done, aside from the one I previously posted with Stefano Pilati, she also hosted ones recently with Dries Van Noten and Reed Krakoff in March 2012.




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Quote:
Fashion At FIAF 2012 Fashion Talks - Reed Krakoff
Pamela Golbin talks at Fashion at FIAF 2012 Fashion Talks at Florence Gould Hall on March 21, 2012 in New York City. (Zimbio.com)









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Quote:
All of fashion's elite -- Coco Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, Christian Dior -- hail from France, so it's only natural they were all inspired by legendary French dressmaker Madeleine Vionnet. You've probably never heard of her, but the "queen of the bias cut" is the reason we ladies no longer have to wear corsets, padding, or stiff dresses.

With her dress designs, she accentuated the female form, creating the body-skimming looks we still see on today's runways. She also brought the then-unusual chiffon, silk, crepe, de chine, gabardine, and satin fabrics into middle-class closets.

The book Madeleine Vionnet -- edited and partly written by the chief curator of the Fashion and Textiles Museum at the Louvre, Pamela Golbin -- is making its way to the Wolfsonian as part of a book talk and reception tomorrow night. Golbin, who was raised in Miami and educated at Columbia and the Sorbonne, has been curating exhibitions for one of the most popular museums in the world since 1993.

New Times caught up with Golbin before the book reading, to talk Miami influences, fashion, and Vionnet's rivalry with... Coco Chanel?

New Times: So you were raised in Miami?
Pamela Golbin: I was raised in Miami. I went to Ransom Everglades for Junior High and High School. So I guess that counts as being raised in Miami? [Laughs].

Do you feel like Miami influenced your sense of style and fashion choices?
Umm ... you know, maybe I should start by saying I'm quite a mixture of different cultures. I'm Franco-Chilean, born in Peru, and raised here. And I think that Miami was such a wonderful place to grow up, because it was such a melting pot -- not only of South Americans, but of Europeans, as well. So there's a wonderful mixture. And it was a time where South Beach wasn't really what it is today. But all of Miami was really moving forward. So fashion was definitely an expression that was very creative at the time. All designers were very well represented in Miami, so that it was a great fashion center as well.

So then what was it that first inspired you to get into fashion?
First of all, I'm an art historian by training. I went to Columbia University and majored in Art History and abstract expressionist art. So it's a little specific. But whether it be through my paternal grandmother who was a client of Parisian Haute Couture or from my mother, fashion was always a part of our lives. And fashion design was always seen as a very creative and wonderful element to appropriate into our personal style -- my sister and I. So I guess it was by chance that I got into fashion in museums.

There's a big difference going from art and art history into fashion.
Well at the same I was studying art history in New York, I was also interning at the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan while I was at school. And during the summer I was also interning at the Fashion Museum, which I also ended up being a curator. So by the time I actually finished my university studies, I had over five years experience at two of the most important museums that had costume collections in the world. Especially at the time -- this was over 20 years ago. There was no real program of fashion history or fashion in museums. So it was a learning process that was done directly inside the institutions. And I had that privilege to be able to see the two greatest collections in the world. So when I finished my studies, I was named the youngest fashion curator in France. So I stayed there, and I've been at the museum as the curator -- now curator-in-chief -- for the last 18 years.

Have you incorporated anything with a Miami flavor or Miami influence in anything that you've done at the museum?
Well I think that I always have Miami in my heart because I did spend such crucial years here. Junior High and High School are very important and formative years. I don't know how to describe Miami style if I had to, but it's definitely part of my vocabulary that I use on a regular basis. How, exactly, would be a more difficult question to reply to. But I guess it is just part of my culture.

You've published books on all the major designers, among them LaCroix, Yves Saint Laurent, Valentino, and Balenciaga... why was Madeleine Vionnet next on your list?
Well I'm quite lucky, because I oversee one of the most important collections of costumes and textiles. Madeleine Vionnet is the icon and the most important fashion designer in the 20th century. It just so happens that she herself made an incredible donation to the museum in 1952 and she gave all of her personal archives to us. So we do have the largest public collection of her work in the world. It was a project that I've been wanting to do for about 20 years, and finally all of the elements came up that allowed us to do it. We were able to do the first major retrospective in Paris of her work, and the book accompanied that exhibition.
*blogs.miaminewtimes.com


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Quote:
Valentino : Themes and Variations by Pamela Golbin

The name Valentino has been synonymous with high fashion for almost fifty years. Based in Rome, Valentino is only one of two couture houses recognized by the French government outside of Paris. His exquisite designs are coveted and worn by young Hollywood and high society the world over. On the occasion of his last couture collection, presented in Paris in the spring of 2008, this landmark book celebrates forty-five years of Valentino’s remarkable career. Published in association with a prestigious exhibition at the Museé des Arts Decoratifs’s famed costume department in Paris, this volume focuses on Valentino’s haute couture creations, highlighting the most important and iconic creations of his half-century in fashion through recurring themes in Valentino’s work—variations on the ideas of volume, line, and texture as well as motifs such as geometry, pleats, and flowers—through new photography, sketches, fabric samples, and commentary on the dresses by Valentino himself. In addition, unprecedented photography by François Halard of Valentino’s last fittings and backstage of his runway show reveals Valentino’s private world for the first time. "Valentino On Valentino," a chapter of first-person accounts of the designs of these iconic dresses, along with Valentino’s commentary on his fashion, will make this publication unique in the study of Valentino as a cultural and artistic icon.


Quote:
Madeleine Vionnet by Pamela Golbin

Famous for the "bias cut," Madeleine Vionnet’s sophisticated approach to couture remains a pervasive influence today. Eschewing artificial and restrictive padding and stiffening, she liberated the female form with designs that integrated movement and comfort into women’s fashion. She also championed unusual fabrics that were luxurious and sensual yet simple and modern—chiffon, silk, crêpe de chine, gabardine, and satin. Her most revolutionary creations—the handkerchief dress, cowl neck, and halter top—cling to and seamlessly move with the wearer. Vionnet’s principles of elegance, movement, architectural form, and timeless style continue to inform contemporary fashion. This lavishly illustrated book showcases Vionnet’s daringly original designs worn by 80 internationally famous models photographed especially for this book alongside original patterns and archival images by such icons as Horst and Steichen.
*Amazon.co.uk

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More of the Vuitton exhibit...




*Vogue.co.uk

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More....




*Vogue.co.uk

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^More from the Vuitton exhibit...








*Elizabeth Anne Fowler/Flickr

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