"Made in China" - the Fashion Spot
 
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18-02-2006
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"Made in China"
Does anyone have trouble buying clothes that are made in China? I've seen some nice clothes with some intricate details out there, but I just can't seem to shake the idea that they are some how "cheaper" than goods made anywhere else. I ask this because I am hearing that some of Dior Homme stuff might be made in China in the future, and that some of Cloaks clothes that are made here in N.Y. are not of the best quality either. I guess my question is: Does the place of origin matter in reality, or is it just perception?

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18-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyt
I ask this because I am hearing that some of Dior Homme stuff might be made in China in the future,
...prada is also currently looking for a factory in china...


Last edited by brian; 18-02-2006 at 01:14 PM.
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18-02-2006
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I don't think authentic goods made in China would be of any lower quality. I suppose people only think that way because of the heavy amount of cheap knockoffs made in China. Obviously, the manufacturers usually don't put as much time and energy into producing knockoffs, selecting the right fabric etc. as they do with authentic designer goods, and thus the quality will be inferior. But I don't think that the quality of authentic designer goods necessarily will be any different just because it's made in China, it'll just be cheaper for them to make

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18-02-2006
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I sort of have a little issue with so many products being produced in China. I think it is because of the cheap labor. That's one of the reason why I won't shop at Wal-Mart. Everything is so cheap because it is produced cheap and it takes away from smaller companies and businesses.

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18-02-2006
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Not Knock-offs
I'm just wondering if designer goods (ie. Prada, Dior Homme) carried a "made in China" tag, would that hinder your opinion of them? I know the quality can still be good. I'm just curious if there is still a stigma attached.

-j

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18-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnnyt
I'm just wondering if designer goods (ie. Prada, Dior Homme) carried a "made in China" tag, would that hinder your opinion of them? I know the quality can still be good. I'm just curious if there is still a stigma attached.

-j

I think there is still some stigma attached to goods produced in China. China has artisans and workers as skilled as any in the world. I think this is something that takes time to get the public to turn around. It used to be when one saw Made in Japan in the 1960s, people would think it was a cheap product. But look at what is coming out of Japan now. It took a while, but people turned around.

I don't need to look at a label, I can tell whether the craftsmanship is good by looking at it. But we can all learn that looking at a label of origin doesn't necessarily imply good or bad quality. I bought a small, beautifully made Japanese makeup case the other day, and found a Made in China label inside. It didn't detract how I now felt of the product, it made me realize that the label means nothing when one appreciates a product that is obviously very well crafted.

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18-02-2006
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I personally do my best to avoid purchasing any products made in China. Simply based on my knowledge from newspaper articles and media information. I believe that over eighty percent of employees within China’s industrialized economy are under paid and are of under legal working age. In fact a recent news article I read in the Global Mail stated that the average wage employees in such industrialized countries in China, is approximately three cents American.

In concerns to couture labels being produced in China, I find that appalling. As a consumer I pay a ridiculous amount of money for certain labels and I withhold standards that these products not be made in countries that the average worker gets a wage which is inhumane. I believe that if I am going to pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars on a product, that they be manufactured in a country where the minimum wage does not consist of cents.

I feel that as a society we as consumers have to stop and realize that those whom manufacture products we use, are human and deserve more than a few pennies an hour. If we as consumers allow such things as child labor and under paid to go unnoticed we are just as bad as those whom employee them. That’s my two cents on that whole situation.

One last note, how can companies like Prada and Dior of such luxury, whom have a net worth of billions of dollar, seek to save MORE money but producing their items in China, when we as consumers pay well over ridiculous amounts of money towards their items. I can guarantee you, that what we pay is WAY far above what they pay to manufacture them in countries, such as France, Italy, United States and so on.

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18-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unplugged66
One last note, how can companies like Prada and Dior of such luxury, whom have a net worth of billions of dollar, seek to save MORE money but producing their items in China, when we as consumers pay well over ridiculous amounts of money towards their items. I can guarantee you, that what we pay is WAY far above what they pay to manufacture them in countries, such as France, Italy, United States and so on.
Yep. But companies, especially publically traded companies, will do anything to maximise profit. Fact of life. I have personal experience, my former job has moved to China... And the quality has gone down, and will probably continue to spiral down...

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18-02-2006
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This has also been discussed a lot in the past. A quick search gave me these hits, but there are more topics regarding this:

http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...eas-32525.html

http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...xyz-10576.html

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18-02-2006
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unplugged66, karma for you....! terrific post.... I stand by what you had to say..! it is very true...!

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18-02-2006
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http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...ina-27677.html

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18-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimkhuu
unplugged66, karma for you....! terrific post.... I stand by what you had to say..! it is very true...!
i know this topic is discussed for many times, but what unplugged66 said only proved one thing: successful public propaganda.

The motivation for western media to do so is that the cheaper labor has been taking their business away. By nature, they want to protect their business through media and quota, etc.

The reality is that when the cost of living is 1/10 or even less than the developed world, you can't use the American/Canadian min. wage standard to judge how much the workers in China are paid for. My family has jewelry business in China. The workers make little in American standard, but their wage is more than decent in China.

I also look at it in this way: There are 1 billion agricultural population in China, but agriculture needs a lot less labor nowadays due to modernization. So what can those excess labors do to improve their lives? They come to the cities and work in factories. By doing so, they make more than before and they send money back to the rural area to build their houses. Whatever money they make is better than making nothing and being starved. If you are saying that you don't buy those products because they are underpaid, then not buying products only means you make them starved. Which one is worse?

This is simply how the global economy works. The manufacturing jobs are moving to the excess agricultural labors' hands. There will be people buying "made in China" products because it makes economic sense. At the end of the day, stock holders, you and me, benefit from the higher profit margins.

Finally, this is similar to what happened in England from 1470s to late 18th century: textile industry was a lot more profitable than agriculture, so the lords forced the peasants to leave their homes so that they could raise sheep in rural area and make more money. Agricultural population was reduced dramatically. At the same time, the peasants were forced to take manufacturing jobs and they made extremely low salaries (otherwise they would be penalized by law, say, to become slaves). It was a very dark period from a humanitarian standpoint, but it accelerated the industrialization and provided the labor for the developing manufacturing industry. I don't think that people at that time refused to purchase certain products because the workers were "underpaid".

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18-02-2006
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I agree with Caffeine's reasoning.

But I'm more concerned with the fact that these luxury companies are seeking to make even MORE profit than they do already from the huge cost-profit mark ups. It just doesn't make any sense. The whole point of getting things made in China is to be more cost-effective - something that high street/cheaper brands could benefit from. But why does Prada need to scrimp the pennies????

It's just absurd in my opinion.

I don't have a problem with buying something made in China because I don't necessarily think there's an inferiority of quality issue (though obviously, I'd need close inspection!) but I do have a problem of ppl's livelihood's being taken away in perfectly good factories in Europe/US.

Also just a note about the situation in England: Agriculture remained the dominant industry in England even up to the early 1920's. I couldn't believe it either when my tutor told me (I did pre-industry and industrial history of England). The agricultural population did deplete but continued to grow at the same time just at a slower rate (if that makes any sense). Labour forces for factories grew at will and actually wage dockets show that they were above average which actually accelerated a demand for consumer goods now that they had a better income. So in that respect, we're seeing the same thing in China - a factory job earns a lot more than say working in agriculture and which is why China's demand for luxury/consumer goods is growing.

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18-02-2006
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I also agree with caffeine's reasoning. My personal take on it is such: I'm doing some production work in L.A. for some local designers. Keeping production costs down and making the goods as cheap as possible while getting the best quality is the goal. I have found that when working with higher-end lines who want to use local labor, it can be hard to find good quality and sewing shops that want to do the difficult work, no matter how much they will get paid. A lot of the sewing contractors would rather do simple pieces than do a constructed/tailored piece. Most of the sewers are migrant workers who are happy to make minimum wage or slightly better. If a designer is selling enough units, he or she then has the option to use production facilities in China. The Chinese have NO PROBLEM doing the work no matter how labor intensive (hand sewing, tailoring, etc..), and I've seen amazing stuff from them. I have also seen some crap from local resources. To tell you the truth, it's difficult to find quality sewing contractors in Los Angeles. Yet, somehow, the idea that "made in the U.S.A." means better quality (not when it comes to cars, though) seams to permeate the customers consiousness.

-j

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18-02-2006
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I'm assuming the only reason high fashion designers would look for a factory in china or think of production there would be to shake down production costs. It's mostly (I'm guessing) going to end up costing them less to produce due to lower wages. The quality however will very VERY likely remain the same as the point of high-end brands and high-end prices are due to their high-end quality.

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