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30-03-2009
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roisin's Avatar
 
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the people at my local UO kind of suck. they're always carrying their own conversations amongst each other and make you wait to ask questions. I was there last night and asked to used the fitting room and the girl told me to wait...because she was talking to one of the other employees. I would understand if she was putting something away or whatever but no, she was just talking.

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30-03-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roisin View Post
the people at my local UO kind of suck. they're always carrying their own conversations amongst each other and make you wait to ask questions. I was there last night and asked to used the fitting room and the girl told me to wait...because she was talking to one of the other employees. I would understand if she was putting something away or whatever but no, she was just talking.
wooow. that's so rude and unprofessional. you should've talked to the manager about her.

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31-03-2009
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^ yes it was really frustrating. I know I probably should have gone to the manager. But to be honest, they're ALL like that at this particular store, I doubt the manager would do anything about it.

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01-04-2009
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i mean, they signed up for that job. the least they can do is do a decent job of it.
the UO near my place has very good costumer service. one girl was even nice enough
to give me some of her employee discount! but i said no, cos i couldn't let her do that
for me.

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01-04-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by December_25th View Post
On topic with the thread... for me, American Apparel consistently has the WORST. customer service.
The staff in the AA stores in London are all nice in my experience! (the ones in Camden and Covent Garden anyway)

One the one hand being ignored by staff is annoying and frustrating but I hate pushy staff too! I was trying on a top in Selfridges a few days ago and the guy insisted on loitering outside the changing room and then pulled the curtain aside to tell me how amazing he thought it was and wouldn't go away! I ended up not buying it because the guy wouldn't leave me in peace to make my own mind up!

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01-04-2009
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For me, Gucci & Louis Vuitton on Sloane Street in London. I actually had to call the main office and complain. I never stepped back after 3 years into their boutique.

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01-04-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hautechild View Post
The staff in the AA stores in London are all nice in my experience! (the ones in Camden and Covent Garden anyway)

One the one hand being ignored by staff is annoying and frustrating but I hate pushy staff too! I was trying on a top in Selfridges a few days ago and the guy insisted on loitering outside the changing room and then pulled the curtain aside to tell me how amazing he thought it was and wouldn't go away! I ended up not buying it because the guy wouldn't leave me in peace to make my own mind up!
Was he looking for a date?

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02-04-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionista-ta View Post
Was he looking for a date?


I think it's more likely he was looking for a commission on the sale!

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02-04-2009
  279
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzling85 View Post
For me, Gucci & Louis Vuitton on Sloane Street in London. I actually had to call the main office and complain. I never stepped back after 3 years into their boutique.
I'm just curious on how the handled the incident after you complained. Did they offer an apology, anything free??

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02-04-2009
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I'm just curious on how the handled the incident after you complained. Did they offer an apology, anything free??
No, they didnt. They just they were really sorry.

LV were closing in 20min. They wouldnt let me look ath their jewlery collection because they said they were closing. I went to look at the shoes and no sales person would help and when a sales person came after 15min she said she was busy with another customer and that they were closing.

Gucci, I brought a few things. Went home, realized my top wasnt in the bag. I went back to the sales person who served me and she instintly in a loud voice said I put it in, I will also show you security tapes, I did not take it (I didnt accuse her of that). I asked to see the manager, who was quite nice but the sales lady gave me such looks.

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03-04-2009
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Gucci and LV have always been very nice to me, despite usually walking in in jeans and a tank top. The Tiffany's store is another story - they would barely give me the time of day. What does a girl have to do, whip out her Platinum credit card and throw it down on the counter to get some help?

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03-04-2009
  282
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Denimology View Post
Gucci and LV have always been very nice to me, despite usually walking in in jeans and a tank top. The Tiffany's store is another story - they would barely give me the time of day. What does a girl have to do, whip out her Platinum credit card and throw it down on the counter to get some help?
Or a Black AMEX.

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03-04-2009
  283
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Carlings is horrible. They nearly force you to buy stuff, I (and many others) haven't been there for years because of their bad service.

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03-04-2009
  284
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzling85 View Post
No, they didnt. They just they were really sorry.

LV were closing in 20min. They wouldnt let me look ath their jewlery collection because they said they were closing. I went to look at the shoes and no sales person would help and when a sales person came after 15min she said she was busy with another customer and that they were closing.

Gucci, I brought a few things. Went home, realized my top wasnt in the bag. I went back to the sales person who served me and she instintly in a loud voice said I put it in, I will also show you security tapes, I did not take it (I didnt accuse her of that). I asked to see the manager, who was quite nice but the sales lady gave me such looks.
When I worked in retail, the best manager I worked for told us that he made one of his best sales ever to someone who came in 5 minutes before closing and bought a bunch of shoes. Anyone who wanted to come in at closing time, he was happy to have them and encouraged us to think the same way. We were on commission, I certainly didn't care what time someone arrived or what they were wearing. Frequently I would sell big-ticket items to women who were dressed down for the weekend, and they would tell me the other SAs wouldn't help them. I'm not a snob, but I certainly was never interested in paying to be a snob, which is what they're doing when they judge someone & lose the sale ...

In the shocking category, I had a pretty nice shopping experience in Neiman's shoe dept last night. Not only that, my SA didn't seem to be the only nice one. I guess they are feeling the pinch

I also noticed they seemed to have quite a selection of flashy shoes--what you might expect to see in the Moscow outpost, if they had one (and maybe they do ). I am a believer in statement shoes, but these were way beyond what I would consider wearing.

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09-04-2009
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I thought this was really interesting..
Quote:
Snooty Service Falls Out of Style

A new solicitousness at high-end boutiques

Angel Yimsiriwattana still remembers feeling intimidated when she walked into a Chanel boutique in New York two years ago.
When she approached a salesman, he "was snooty and reserved," she says, and barely spoke to her. Clad in a casual sweater and jeans, she figured the sales staff sized her up as someone unlikely to buy. Even though she spent $7,000 that day, she still felt unwelcome.
The atmosphere is a lot different at the Chanel boutique in Soho these days. On a recent visit to the same store, the 27-year-old says she was treated like a princess. "As soon as I walked in, [the sales associates] were smiling and said 'how are you?,"' she says. "Everyone circled around me like little fish. They were extra nice and helpful." Even though she didn't buy anything, the sales staff cheerfully wished her "a nice day" as she walked out of the store.
As the luxury goods industry suffers a massive slump in sales - many sales clerks at designer stores who were famously haughty and patronizing suddenly have changed their styles. In the boom times, the aloof service was part of the exclusive aura cultivated by some brands, sending a message that only the coolest or richest customers were worthy of a purchase. Now, "that arrogant and snobby attitude of feeling people should be grateful to buy at their temple is a dinosaur mentality that is going extinct," says Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, a consumer-research firm. "Now those brands have to be grateful for a customer."
In some cases, the new solicitousness is such a dramatic change from the past that it is catching consumers off guard.
When Tony Brown shopped at the Paul Stuart shop in New York in the past, he was used to being generally ignored. But recently, when he walked into the store he was approached by "four or five" associates who each said hello, welcomed him to the store and asked if they could be of assistance. "It was like a popularity contest," he says of their lavishing attention on him. With the store nearly empty, "it's more of an event if a customer comes in. It's like 'we've got one!"' he says.
While shopping at a Bottega Veneta boutique in New York recently, Britton Warren said he noticed an almost strained attentiveness, with sales associates "giving me all kinds of oohs and ahhs when I tried things on."
When Mr. Warren bought a pair of brown loafers discounted to about $430 from about $720 at a Fendi boutique, three employees complimented him on his choice, offering effusive praise. "They would go back and forth telling me how wonderful the shoes are and say things like 'oh that's a great pair of shoes,'" Mr. Warren says.
He was even more surprised when he received a handwritten note from the sales person thanking him for buying the shoes and hoping to see him again soon. "That's never happened before," says the 24-year-old paralegal from Washington D.C.
Retailers generally don't want to discuss the shift in service. Bottega Veneta and Paul Stuart declined to comment and Chanel and Fendi did not respond to requests for comment. But some do acknowledge that they've instructed their sales clerks to be less abrupt, spend more time with customers and refrain from being pushy.
At Neiman Marcus, sales associates are being encouraged to be "more patient" with customers. "We have seen that customers are more anxious and there is some concern out there," says Ginger Reeder, a spokeswoman for Neiman Marcus. "So it behooves all of us to remember to be a little more patient."
Sales clerks have mixed feelings about their new marching orders. Dena Webb, who worked at Barneys New York's Beverly Hills store as a sales associate and supervisor, says that last fall store managers began requiring sales associates to send a weekly minimum of 10 handwritten thank-you notes to customers, including first-time customers. "I thought it was kind of a little pushy to send thank-you notes to people I had only helped once," says Ms. Webb, who left Barneys in December. "It felt forced." Barneys had no comment.
Kristina Bowers, a sales clerk at a Miu Miu boutique in London, said that when store traffic slowed last fall and sales targets weren't met, she was told by a manager to approach every customer who walked in.
"They wanted us to jump on them," she says. The manager also encouraged sales associates to make eye contact and be "more approachable, really approachable and make everyone feel welcome no matter who they are, even if they clearly looked like someone who couldn't easily afford to buy anything," she said. "They put an extra emphasis on being friendly."
Ms. Bowers, who left the store in November when she got a graphic design job in the U.S.., says she and her colleagues were uncomfortable with the new aggressiveness. Pouncing on a customer "is not really my style. I like to give them a minute to look around, to think about it," she says. "It was different from how I normally operate."
Ultimately, she said clerks did as they were told because they worried about losing their jobs. "We just wanted to hit our sales targets," she says. The company declined to comment.
On Kristen Dawson's previous visits to a Burberry store in Towson, Md., "it was more self-service" with little interaction with a sales associate "unless you had a question or brought something to a register," says the 31-year-old stay-at-home mom from Baltimore. "The attitude [of the sales staff] was 'I'm not going to waste my time on you unless you're ready to buy something.' They were very haughty."
But when she and her husband entered the store in late December, they were greeted by a cheerful salesman offering assistance – a first, she says. He stayed with them as they looked through scarves, amicably peppering them with questions about what color and style they were looking for and for whom they were buying it. The clerk proceeded to strike up friendly banter with Ms. Dawson's husband as he wrapped the gift and she looked at purses. "All the time he was trying to be friendly and kept asking if there was anything else he could help us with," she says. "It was a nice surprise." A Burberry spokesman declined comment.
Some stores are learning that extra-friendly service doesn't always yield extra sales. Lauren Mitinas-Kelly, a 29-year-old manager at a luxury travel services company, still remembers the unusual service she received recently at the Anne Fontaine store in New York, an upscale French boutique known for its expensive white shirts.
When she walked in, the saleswoman "was so overly on top of me it actually got to the point where I was getting annoyed," she said. When she went into a dressing room, the saleswoman kept bringing more and more clothing back that Ms. Mitinas-Kelly had not requested. "She would say 'this is our most popular item,"' she recalls. "Or, 'these are our newest' (designs), trying to bring new suggestions."
Ms. Mitinas-Kelly began to feel sorry for the woman. "With no other customers in the store, she's got to do what she's got to do." Still, the effort didn't do any good. She only bought what she originally intended to buy in the first place. "I ended up buying one white blouse."
online.wsj

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