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26-02-2013
  61
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flyme2themoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,260
Dolce & Gabbana
Makeup: Pat McGrath
Hair: Guido Palau






Quote:
Sophia Loren And A “Crowning” Achievement In Beauty, Backstage At Dolce & Gabbana
February 25, 2013

There are few designers who are as unwaveringly loyal to their core house codes as Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, and like clockwork, their twist on classic Italian glamour was very much on view for Fall. “They don’t need to reinvent [their woman] every season, because they really understand how a woman likes to look,” Guido Palau said backstage. “They bring back all the little tricks to beauty that in years gone by we’ve thrown away,” he continued, working on a slightly deconstructed updo.

“It’s all things that really flatter,” Palau explained of the style’s subtleties while prepping hair with Redken Guts 10 Volume Spray Foam mousse and its Quick Tease 15 Backcombing Finishing Spray, which he spritzed onto the crown before adding a bit of height. Creating deliberately short center parts, Palau gathered two front sections that he crisscrossed in the back of the head as he swept up lengths into something of a free-form twist-turned-chignon. “It’s as if they did it themselves,” he suggested of the look, which was kept deliberately flat to create a specific silhouette. “If you have volume up top and with the bun, they fight each other,” Palau pointed out, affixing eighteen bejeweled, Byzantine-inspired crowns to the heads of select models, including Kate King, Bette Franke, Karlie Kloss, and Jasmine Tookes.

Pat McGrath got the same brief as Palau—which included nods to the gilded mosaic tiles in Sicily’s Cathedral of Monreale that were reproduced on a series of dresses—as well as the mention of Mr. Dolce and Mr. Gabbana’s “favorite” actress, Sophia Loren. The beauty icon’s face was pinned up all over the makeup area, her signature crimson lips and black cat-eye serving as the ultimate inspiration for McGrath’s own interpretation of the classic combo. “It’s quite different because there’s no highlight, no hint of blush, no contour, but it’s still very effective,” the makeup artist explained of complexions that were kept purposefully powdered and velvety with Dolce & Gabbana’s new Perfect Matte Liquid Foundation, rather than kissed with hints of pink and apricot blush, as is often customary here. Coating the inner rims of eyes with its Crayon Intense Eyeliner in Black, before drawing on thick flicks with its liquid Glam Liner in Black Intense, McGrath treated lashes to multiple swipes of Dolce & Gabbana Intenseyes Mascara in Black. Then she started in on those mouths, which were built more than they were painted. Covering the entire lip surface with Dolce’s Precision Lipliner in Ruby, McGrath blended a mix of its Classic Cream Lipstick in Ultra and Amethyst, thus fashioning a berry-tinged scarlet shade that she subsequently blotted and powdered for a flat finish. “It’s a real process,” she joked of the technique, although if ever the “anything worth doing, is worth doing right” adage applied, it’d certainly be here.
Source: style.com

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26-02-2013
  62
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,260
Fendi
Makeup: Peter Philips
Hair: Sam McKnight





Quote:
“Punky” In Purple, Backstage At Fendi
February 21, 2013

The mulberry mouth that dominated the Fall 2012 shows is having a bit of a resurgence this season, although it’s popping up in a few unexpected variations. “Kiki de Montparnasse. That was the reference for the lip,” Peter Philips said of the burnt-purple pouts he masterminded backstage at Fendi, explaining that the vampy jazz-age Parisian artist and muse served as a good starting point for the conceptualization of “a retro element that at the same time looked punky.”

Keeping skin matte with Chanel Pro Lumière Professional Finish Makeup and a dusting of its Poudre Universelle Libre, Philips concentrated his attention on an equally powdery pout, which he coated with its Rouge Allure Velvet in La Provocante. “The brows are strong because there is nothing on the lids,” he continued, brushing up arches and grooming them with Chanel Crayon Sourcils Sculpting Eyebrow Pencils before lacquering nails with a complementary shade of Le Vernis de Chanel in Vendetta, a rich blackened aubergine.

Sam McKnight was going for a similar edge. “Punk’s an idea that has been floating around,” the hairstylist confirmed of one of the season’s reigning themes, which led him to prep strands with Pantene Pro-V Deep Moisture Soufflé before weaving a ridged, Mohawk-inspired braid. “Karl [Lagerfeld] loves a graphic shape,” McKnight continued of the creative process that evolved to include spray-painted fox-fur headpieces pinned to the top of models’ coifs to add an embellished element to the silhouette. Finishing the look with a mist of Oribe Superfine Hair Spray, McKnight left the length of his plaits varied—on purpose. “I love all the bobs,” he effused of the bevy of short haircuts models like Daria Strokous, Kel Markey, and Karlie Kloss brought to the casting. “I feel it’s a little old-fashioned to have everyone have the same hair for a show, anyway.”

Source: style.com

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26-02-2013
  63
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,260
Marni
Makeup: Tom Pecheux
Hair: Paul Hanlon




Quote:
“Blurry” Bordeaux Lips And “Vine-y” Hair, Backstage At Marni
February 24, 2013 9:32 pm

Tom Pecheux loves Marni, a point that is made ever clearer by the fact that, when you ask him about the makeup backstage here, his first priority is to tell you about the clothes. “It’s an insane, insane, insane beautiful collection,” he gushed about Consuelo Castiglioni’s Fall lineup, which, in a slight departure, was devoid of her signature bounty of prints and embroidery, and instead featured a masculine, monochromatic palette of luxurious fabrics. There was a single color that caught Pecheux’s eye, though: a deep, piercing raspberry fur that served as the inspiration for one of the best bordeaux lips we’ve seen yet this season.

“I wanted it to be a little blurry,” the makeup artist explained of the wash of MAC Lipmix in Crimson and its Lipstick in Hang-up that he painted onto pouts and topped with its Pigment in Basic Red to impart a dry finish. “Destroy the line,” he instructed his team while dipping Q-tips into MAC’s Invisible Set Powder and tracing them around the lip line for a diffused effect that called to mind old Sarah Moon photos. The powder was also integral to mattifying models’ skin, which was kept deliberately pale to make the mouth pop—and to contrast with the combination of MAC Lipmixes in Mid-Tone Nude and Orange that Pecheux layered across lids and underneath the lower lash line before topping them with its Gloss Texture for shine.

Acknowledging that Castiglioni’s woman was much “tougher” than usual for Fall, Paul Hanlon was compelled to add a masculine edge to hair via an extra-low side part that was coated with Tigi Catwalk Curlesque Strong Mousse and diffused through hairnets to achieve a “vine-y” texture that resembled ropes. “It’s a little bit twisted,” he admitted, making a purposefully bent mark in the back of strands to create the illusion of a scarf that had been tied around them causing a ridged imprint. The point was to move away from more whimsical notions and embrace something decidedly “deconstructed” instead, Hanlon explained. Mission accomplished.
Source: style.com

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15-03-2013
  64
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Join Date: Jul 2005
Gender: femme
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Rochas
Makeup: Lucia Pieroni
Hair: Eugene Souleiman





Quote:
“Forties Brows” And “Bad Perms,” Backstage At Rochas
February 27, 2013

“Someone like Lee Miller” is who Lucia Pieroni was channeling backstage at Rochas, where it was all about that kind of “incredibly rich, well-kept woman that doesn’t even need to bother,” according to the makeup artist. The resulting beauty look was a slight departure from the hyper-feminized makeup that designer Marco Zanini typically orders up here, which reliably includes a standout lip. “We tried a lip,” Pieroni admitted, while using Clé de Peau Luminizing Face Enhancers in No. 11, a cool silver, and No. 12, a warm gold, to sculpt the skin, “but it made it too pretty, too lady—too retro,” she conceded. As an alternative, Pieroni deliberately eschewed mascara, eye liner, and blush in favor of a neutral-tinted lid that was stained with Clé de Peau’s Satin Eye Color in No. 208, a dark taupe-y brown, and a “forties brow,” courtesy of its eyebrow pencils. “The arch is much wider,” Pieroni explained of the decade’s specific brow shape, which registers slightly differently than the grooming techniques popular in the fifties or even eighties. “It makes them look a bit straight,” she elaborated.

Eugene Souleiman was less willing to pin the hair to a specific era when talking about what appeared, at first glance, to be a style reminiscent of forties-inspired waves. “It’d be Guy Bourdin-y in 1973 if it were done really well,” he maintained, careful to emphasize that he was not trying to produce yet another iteration of the big, soft, seventies-cum-forties ringlets we’ve seen so much of already this season. Instead, Souleiman maintained that he and Zanini wanted to pay tribute to Nicoletta Santoro, the Italian fashion editor and stylist who has played muse to Zanini before—and who happens to have “incredibly curly hair that she tries to tame but can’t,” according to the coiffeur. Creating an extra-deep side part, “almost like a comb-over,” Souleiman flat-ironed strands about a third of the way through the lengths before switching textures entirely. “It’s like a bob, with a bad perm,” he elaborated of the tightly wound loops that were wrapped around an iron through the ends and then “stretched out” to produce a looser wave with some deliberate frizz. “It’s not supposed to be particularly attractive,” he insisted, “because everything else is.”
Source: style.com

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15-03-2013
  65
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Prada
Makeup: Pat McGrath
Hair: Guido Palau






Quote:
“Wet” Hair And “Undone” Makeup, Backstage At Prada
February 21, 2013

As catwalking legends including Mariacarla Boscono, nineties grunge icon Kirsten Owen, and even Victoria’s Secret Angel Adriana Lima moved about the crowded backstage area at Prada among a host of their younger, greener peers, Guido Palau stated the obvious about their hair. “It’s…wet basically,” the Redken creative consultant laughed, motioning toward the damp, stringy strands in his midst. “The clothes are superrich, so we wanted to break that,” he elaborated of the texture that was side-parted or pushed straight back, depending on the girl. “The ultimate ease is wet, just-out-of-the-shower hair. I mean, how chic is that?”

Applying copious amounts of Redken Guts 10 Volume Spray Foam mousse, Palau was going for a deliberate disheveledness—or “nonchalance,” as he called it—which offset the luxe, 1940s, almost twisted quality of Miuccia Prada’s Fall collection. Snipping a few inches off of models’ ends with a layering technique to make sure there were no blunt lines, Palau polished on an extra slick of Redken’s forthcoming Diamond Oil Shatterproof Shine across lengths to get a positively damp finish. “It’s sexy—and a little melancholy,” he surmised.

Makeup artist Pat McGrath fleshed out the story line a bit more. “We were obsessed with the contrast of rich and poor,” she said, stressing the word “undone” when describing the beautiful burgundy-stained mouths she was drawing in darker toward the center of models’ lips and then diffusing outward with a clear balm. “It’s the shadow of formerly amazing makeup,” she continued of what were essentially traces of pigment, including a gray tone on lids, that were used to mimic the animated shadows of tiny-waisted women (and cats) that had been projected onto the walls of Mrs. Prada’s runway. When asked about the growing prevalence of slate and asphalt smoky shadows this season, instead of more standard black incarnations, McGrath admitted that they’re not the easiest colors to wear. “It needs to be transparent to give it more depth,” she said, adding a greasy shine with “tons” of Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream as well as multiple licks of mascara on top and bottom lashes.
Source: style.com

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15-03-2013
  66
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Roberto Cavalli
Makeup: Lucia Pieroni
Hair: Guido Palau





Quote:
Backstage At Roberto Cavalli, “Tough, Boyish, Cool” Girls Still Reign
February 23, 2013

The makeup artist job at Roberto Cavalli has been something of a revolving door of late. The past three seasons have seen three different face painters take the reins backstage at the show, although the ever-present Cavalli girl herself—who will not be parted from her black eyeliner—has made the transition of power a relatively seamless one. For Fall, Lucia Pieroni was tasked with bringing her own spin to the house’s “sexy, punky” vibe, which resulted in an “oily eye”—not to be confused with a greasy eye. “I’m bored of greasy eyes,” Pieroni admitted.

Rimming lids with a black kohl pencil, she blended MAC Eyeshadows in Black Tied, a shimmering onyx, and Carbon, a matte obsidian, into an elongated shape underneath the lower lash line and on top of the lids. Adding multiple swipes of its Haute & Naughty mascara close to the lash line, she etched a taupe-y pencil along the inside of the eye to open things up. Then came the oily effect, for which Pieroni slicked on a new MAC Pro Eye Gloss prototype in Black Sea, a high-shine, glitter-flecked cream-gel hybrid that she blended to sheer perfection just before models hit the runway. “You can plunk it on, which makes it really thick, like tar,” she said of the multitasking product, “or you can fade it out so it doesn’t get everywhere,” Pieroni laughed, anticipating the pigment’s inevitable sticky aftereffects, as she toned down lips and patted MAC’s fortcoming Cream Eyeshadow in Oyster, a shimmering pearl, on the top of models’ cheekbones for a luminescent highlight.

Guido Palau was honoring the “tough, boyish, cool girl” code that has long ruled here as well, via wet hair that was molded to models’ individual head shapes. Blow-drying strands with Redken Shine Flash 02 Glistening Mist and its forthcoming Diamond Oil Shatterproof Shine Intense, Palau created severe center parts, which he flattened with his fingers and its Forceful 23 Super Strength Finishing Spray. “It has to be, like, a lot of it,” Palau stressed of the quantity of hairspray required to create the kind of reflective, damp surface he was after. “Using shine rather than dry [texture] feels much more luxurious to me right now,” he conceded of what has become one of his favorite looks for Fall—a sentiment that extended to the nails, which were given a clear, ultra-glossy finish courtesy of MAC Overlacquer.
Source: style.com

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15-03-2013
  67
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Rick Owens
Makeup: Lucia Pieroni
Hair: Luigi Murenu




Quote:
Kate Bush-Caliber “Ethereal” Beauty, Backstage At Rick Owens
February 28, 2013

There’s something inexplicably thrilling about a Rick Owens show—and we’re not referring to the production heroics of last season’s foam-waterfall backdrop that cascaded onto the runway, specifically, although that’s certainly part of the allure. (This season, Owens used wind machines and fog to sufficiently set the mood.) It’s more of the highly considered way the designer approaches his craft and his sense of showmanship, which affects every single aspect of his work. “The architectural style of Rick goes from the clothes to the hair,” Owens’ longtime coiffing collaborator, Luigi Murenu, said backstage, elaborating on the “homage to lightness” he was creating with a trio of brand-new BaByliss crimping irons. “It’s instant magic,” he continued of the style that relied on clean, product-free hair and brushed-out ridges, which allowed Murenu to get a texture similar to the incredibly graphic wigs he carved out for Spring, with a whole new level of movement, particularly when the wind machines intermingled with strands at the beginning of the runway. “Kate Bush would be in heaven,” he effused.

Lucia Pieroni did her part by swirling a synthetic brush with coordinating swipes of MAC Full Coverage Foundation in W10 and White and blending it all over models’ faces to essentially block out their features and create a certain sense of transparency. Using an opaque powder to get a “matte whiteness” in the middle of the face and around the eyes—”sort of like goggles,” she explained—Pieroni rubbed MAC’s Cream Colour Base in Pure White with the fleshy Painterly between her fingers and applied the neutral mixture to lashes and brows to eliminate them as well. “We want it to be see-through,” she explained of her endgame, while taking down lips with its Pro Longwear Paint Pot in Camel Coat, a tawny shade of grayish taupe. “They’re basically ethereal beings underneath all this hair.”
Source: style.com

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08-08-2013
  68
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Gender: homme
Posts: 4,357
Thanks for all these. Love Marni as always...

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