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13-03-2006
  46
scenester
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 81
all i can say is NO NO NO! Many of these products contain a chemical called arbutan (sp?) that prevents skin from obtaining pigment. Here in Canada, the FDA will not let this chemical into the country. Who knows what the long term effects will be. Not reccommended.

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13-03-2006
  47
V.I.P.
 
eternitygoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Gender: femme
Posts: 8,032
Don't go into the sun often. That's the best way.

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30-07-2006
  48
windowshopping
 
jassen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: usa
Gender: femme
Posts: 24
skin whitening products
so i had heard of papaya whitening soap but when it comes to my skin, i'm very choosy about what i put on it: i was born with dark hair, blue eyes and fair, fair skin, and being fair is one of my best features, or so i think. so i could never find a really reputable looking source for papaya whitening soap.

i tried the diorsnow whitening line by dior skincare and i have to say, while not getting the results i expected (come to think of it, i don't know what i expected! bleached skin? i hope not!) i have never been happier with a skincare product. i've used clinique, l'oreal and chanel products before and i just use the diorsnow foaming cleanser and my skin is more even (i used to have problems with flushing) and it keeps my fair skin that wintry porcelain color even in the summer.

i only wish that they were paying me to stay this stuff but i just wanted to suggest it to anyone who was concious of their fair skin! the prices for dior stuff are a little bit steep, but hopefully that was kind of assumed.

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30-07-2006
  49
fashion insider
 
VainJane's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Virginia and Seattle
Gender: femme
Posts: 2,043
What a bloody coincidence! I had just logged onto TFS looking for reviews of the Diorsnow line! I have pale skin and I was hoping that Diorsnow would even out my skin tone more (I already tried Shiseido's brightening moisturizer and that hasn't done a damn thing for me). I'm planning on buying one of the diorsnow moisturizers as soon as possible and trying it out.

Thanks for the review, it was very helpful!

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30-07-2006
  50
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marqueemoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,854
Good whitening products don't bleach your skin, apparently. I've never done whitening because my skin is already fair, but I've read about it. Here's a helpful article:

Combination Treatments
Melanin is stimulated by a complex process partially controlled by an
enzyme called tyrosinase. Most skin-lightening treatments are aimed at
inhibiting this enzyme, which can reduce or block some amount of melanin
production. There are many options to consider when searching for a solution. The
most successful treatments use a combination of topical lotions or gels
containing melanin-inhibiting ingredients along with a well-formulated
sunscreen, and a prescription retinoid (such as Renova or generic versions
containing tretinoin, a type of retinoid). Depending on how the skin responds
to these treatments, exfoliants-either in the form of topical cosmetic or
chemical peels-and lasers are also able to further affect pigment and can
definitely enhance results.

Sunscreen
Store shelves are lined with products claiming to lighten skin. But
without question, the first line of defense is smart sun behavior (meaning
avoidance) along with the daily use (365 days a year) and liberal application
(and, when needed, reapplication) of a well-formulated sunscreen. Diligent
use of a sunscreen alone allows some repair as well as protection from
further sun damage, which is what created the problem in the first place.
(Source: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, May 2005, pages
786-792; American Journal of Epidemiology, April 2005, pages 620-627; and The
British Journal of Dermatology, December 1996, pages 867-875). No other
aspect of controlling or reducing skin discolorations is as important as
being careful about exposing your skin to the sun and the use of sunscreen,
SPF 15 or greater (and greater is usually better), with the UVA-protecting
ingredients of titanium dioxide, zinc oxide or avobenzone. Using
skin-lightening products, exfoliants, peels or laser treatments without a sunscreen
(and sun-savvy awareness) will prove to be a waste of time and money. Sun
exposure is one of the primary causes of melasma, and other treatments
can't keep up with the sun's daily assault on the skin. Before you look at
any other option for brown or ashen skin discolorations, applying sunscreen
and reducing sun exposure is the most practical step to start with.

Topicals
Aside from sunscreen, topical hydroquinone is considered the next step in
reducing or eliminating skin discolorations. In fact, topical application
of hydroquinone is considered by many dermatologists to be a safer, as
effective (if not more so), and far less expensive option than lasers or deep
peel treatments. Topical hydroquinone in 2% (available in cosmetics) to 4%
concentrations (available from a physician or by prescription), alone or
in combination with tretinoin 0.05% to 0.1%, has an impressive track
record. Research has repeatedly shown hydroquinone and tretinoin to be powerful
tools against sun- or hormone-induced melasma. (Source: Dermatologic
Surgery, March 2006, pages 365-371)

Some research has shown topical azelaic acid in 15% to 20% concentrations
to be as efficacious as hydroquinone with a decreased risk of irritation.
Tretinoin by itself has also been shown to be especially useful in
treating hyperpigmentation of sun-damaged skin. Kojic acid, alone or in
combination with glycolic acid or hydroquinone, also has shown good results due to
its inhibitory action on tyrosinase (though kojic acid has had its share
of problems in terms of stability and potential negative effects on the
skin and is rarely being used nowadays). Several plant extracts and vitamin C
also have some research showing them to be effective for inhibiting
melanin production (Sources: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, May
2006, pages S272-S281; International Journal of Dermatology, August 2004,
pages 604-607. and The American Journal of Clinical Dermatology,
September-October 2000, pages 261-268). The most reliable and best ones by far to
look for are review below.

Hydroquinone
Hydroquinone deserves more discussion because it has long been established
as being the most effective ingredient for reducing and potentially
eliminating melasma. Over-the-counter hydroquinone products can contain 0.5% to
2% concentrations of hydroquinone, while 4% (and sometimes even higher)
concentrations are available only from a physician.

In medical literature, hydroquinone is considered the primary topical
ingredient for inhibiting melanin production. Using it in combination with the
other options listed in this section-especially tretinoin-can greatly
reduce and even eliminate skin discolorations (Sources: Cutis, March 2006,
pages 177-184; Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, September-October 2005, pages
592-597; Journal of Cosmetic Science, May-June 1998, pages 208-290;
Dermatological Surgery, May 1996, pages 443-447). Interestingly, hydroquinone is
not only a hero for those with sun- or hormone-induced melasma, but its
components have potent antioxidant abilities. (Source: Journal of Natural
Products, November 2002, pages 1605-1611)

Hydroquinone is a strong inhibitor of melanin production (Source: Journal
of Dermatological Science, August, 2001, supplemental, pages 68-75),
meaning that it prevents skin from making the substance responsible for skin
color. Hydroquinone does not bleach the skin, which is why calling it a
bleaching agent is a misnomer as it can't remove pigment from the skin cell.
Hydroquinone can only disrupt the synthesis and production of melanin
hyperpigmentation, which is actually true of any skin-lightening ingredient.
When you prevent melanin from being generated, as new skin cells are formed
and move to the skin's surface, they do not contain the excess pigment
(melanin), therefore reducing or eliminating these darkened areas.

Some concerns about hydroquinone's safety on skin have been expressed, but
the research when it comes to topical application indicates negative
reactions are minor or a result of using extremely high concentrations or from
other skin lightening agents such as glucocorticoids or mecury iodine.
This is particularly true in Africa where adulterated skin lightening
products are commonplace. (Sources: British Journal of Dermatology, March 2003,
pages 493-500 and Critical Reviews in Toxicology, May 1999, pages 283-330)

According to Howard I. Maibach, M.D., professor of dermatology at the
University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, "Overall, adverse
events reported with the use of hydroquinone... have been relatively few
and minor in nature.... To date there is no evidence of adverse systemic
reactions following the use of hydroquinone. and it has been around for over
30 years in skin-care products." Maibach also has stated that
"hydroquinone is undoubtedly the most active and safest skin-depigmenting
substance..." Research supporting Maibach's contentions was published in the Journal
of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 1998, pages 301-317. Concern about
hydroquinone having carcinogenic properties is mostly from
industrial-grade materials and uses. For cosmetic use there appears to be no similar
evidence.

Because of hydroquinone's action on the skin, it can be a skin irritant,
particularly in higher concentrations of 4% or greater and predictably when
combined with tretinoin. Some medications have been created that combine
4% hydroquinone with tretinoin and a form of cortisone. The cortisone is
included as an anti-inflammatory. The negative side effect of repeated
application of cortisone is countered by the positive effect of the tretinoin
so it doesn't cause thinning of skin and damage to collagen. (Source: Drugs
in Dermatology, July-August 2004, pages 377-381)

Hydroquinone can be an unstable ingredient in cosmetic formulations. When
exposed to air or sunlight it can turn a strange shade of brown.
Therefore, when you are considering a hydroquinone product, it is essential to make
sure it is packaged in a non-transparent container that doesn't let light
in and minimizes air exposure. Hydroquinone products packaged in jars are
not recommended because they become ineffective shortly after opening.

Alternatives to Hydroquinone
Although hydroquinone has the highest efficacy and a long history of safe
usage behind it, there are other alternatives that have shown some promise
for lightening skin. But these have been far less researched and often
pale in comparison to hydroquinone. It is interesting to point out that some
of these alternative ingredients are, ironically, derivatives of
hydroquinone. They include Mitracarpus scaber extract, Uva ursi (bearberry)
extract, Morus bombycis (mulberry), Morus alba (white mulberry), and Broussonetia
papyrifera (paper mulberry)-all of which contain arbutin (more technically
known as hydroquinone-beta-D-glucoside)-which can inhibit melanin
production. Pure forms of arbutin are considered more potent for affecting skin
lightening (alpha-arbutin, beta-arbutin, and deoxy-arbutin).

Other options with some amount of research regarding their potential skin
lightening abilities are licorice extract (specifically glabridin),
azelaic acid, and stabilized vitamin C (L-ascobic acid, ascorbic acid, and
magnesium ascorbyl phosphate). What has not been conclusively established for
most of these hydroquinone alternatives is how much is needed in a cosmetic
lotion or cream to obtain an effect.

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30-07-2006
  51
trendsetter
 
ms_prissy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
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are you trying to keep your pale skin or lighten your skin more?
basically any product with 2% hydroquonine will do the job or lightening skin - the higher you go in concentration the more effect you will get but since you already have fair skin I wouldn't suggest going higher than 2%. make sure the product also includes sunscreen.

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31-07-2006
  52
tfs star
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: nowhere
Gender: femme
Posts: 1,760
right

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08-09-2006
  53
rising star
 
Venusia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montreal
Gender: femme
Posts: 156
So has anyone tried the Shiseido or Dior products?

I don't know if it is the mask of pregnancy not fading completely or getting older (34) or what, but my skin tone is less even than it used to be. My chin, the area under my nose and my cheekbones have gotten darker.

I don't mind the cheeks so much, as that's where I would normally apply blush, but I really would like to lighten the area around my mouth.

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08-09-2006
  54
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Location: London/Moscow
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Posts: 2,120
I know that you can make a homemade mask which can a little bit "whiten" your skin. If you crush up a couple of aspirins and mix it in with a bit of water until it turns to a paste, and then apply it on your face, after you rinse it off, you will notice that your face will become slightly more clearer and brighter. I'm not an expert on skincare so i don't know if there is any harm in putting aspirin on your face regurlary. Just as long as you don't use it every day.

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08-09-2006
  55
rising star
 
Venusia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Montreal
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I actually have an allergy to aspirin, so that wouldn't work, unless I enjoyed the balloon-head look. Thanks for the reply, though.

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14-09-2006
  56
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One of my girlfriends is Philipino and she has this obsession with having/wanting pale white skin. So every summer when she goes back to the Phillipines (they're also obsessed with having light skin) she buys a ton of whitening soap made out of papayas. It actually works! She is so freakin' pale & pasty white that it's actually kinda scary! I read the ingrediants and it's herbal with no chemicals. Supposedly it's the papaya extract that makes your skin lighter in colour. I don't know exactly how it's possible, but my friend is living proof! She's so white now that she doesn't even look like she's a part of her own family!

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14-09-2006
  57
front row
 
luna minor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Gender: homme
Posts: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinky*
my mother works in the beauty industry, so if i've learned anything from her, its that the nature line from valmont (especially the serum) is especially skin brightening.

whitening products are just too drying on the skin, and honestly you should stay away from them. They cause wrinkles and early aging in the skin. In fact, after using a whitening product, you may experience more sensitivity from the sun.

the bit about the sensitivity is true, but where have you come up with this nonsense that whitening products cause wrinkles and aging?

i've used the entire Clarins Bright Plus line and the La Prairie Brightening De-Aging Serum and have had nothing but glowing results. And my skin is far from dry or wrinkled.


Last edited by luna minor; 14-09-2006 at 09:23 AM.
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14-09-2006
  58
rising star
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 166
if you don't have a huge budget for products such as dior's white line, then you can try Missha's skin whitening line. their products work great. since they're imported from korea, they contain the same strength as the products found in asia. and it's really affordable. if you live in nyc, you'll have access to their products since they have a few store locations in manhattan. but i believe missha stores are only in new york (other than asia). maybe LA as well...


Last edited by nuyste; 14-09-2006 at 08:30 PM.
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14-09-2006
  59
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Couture_Whore
One of my girlfriends is Philipino and she has this obsession with having/wanting pale white skin. So every summer when she goes back to the Phillipines (they're also obsessed with having light skin) she buys a ton of whitening soap made out of papayas. It actually works! She is so freakin' pale & pasty white that it's actually kinda scary! I read the ingrediants and it's herbal with no chemicals. Supposedly it's the papaya extract that makes your skin lighter in colour. I don't know exactly how it's possible, but my friend is living proof! She's so white now that she doesn't even look like she's a part of her own family!
I'm filipino and you're right, in the Philippines they are really big on having light skin...I may be wrong but I believe most Asian countries are really into having light skin (to emanate western ideals, perhaps?)
I'm not into having lighter skin myself but I have used Eskinol Whitening Cleanser. I couldn't tell if it worked or not...lol! Eskinol has loads of whitening creams, soaps, cleansers and they seem to work pretty well.

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14-09-2006
  60
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebutter
I'm filipino and you're right, in the Philippines they are really big on having light skin...I may be wrong but I believe most Asian countries are really into having light skin (to emanate western ideals, perhaps?)
I'm not into having lighter skin myself but I have used Eskinol Whitening Cleanser. I couldn't tell if it worked or not...lol! Eskinol has loads of whitening creams, soaps, cleansers and they seem to work pretty well.
OOps I meant emulate. Lol

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