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10-04-2008
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kmccormi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
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I think it also depends on genetics. I, unfortunately, was "blessed" with severely flat feet, which means my feet don't arch as much as a normal foot. I did dance for 14 years, and my pointed toes never looked as pointed as the typical image of a ballerina's foot.

Similarly, your feet are forced into an arch when you wear heels. If your feet are naturally arched, this means your weight tends to distribute itself straight down into your heel and ball efficiently. But for me, my feet don't arch enough to let the bottom of my heel be perpendicular to the ground, resulting in a constant struggle to balance well in heels and not feel the pain - its like walking on a slope for me.

I'm wearing the gladiator wedges from Nine West today that look like Balenciagas, and I walked about 4 or 5 blocks in NYC and I couldn't WAIT to sit back down.

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11-04-2008
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educo's Avatar
 
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Location: NYC MUTHA F*CKA!!!
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There is a video out there called "Legwork". It's an exercise video made by a shoe designer and Broadway dancers to work out the legs to walk in heels better. Here is the link:
http://www.legworkdvd.com/the_secret.html

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12-04-2008
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MichelleYue's Avatar
 
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Really? That's sad, it helped me somewhat when I was transitioning into high heels. I suppose it's different for everyone, though "

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dego View Post
That article contained alot of BS...
"Trotting" makes you look like a horse and is not elegant at all. You should NOT walk like a runway model in the street.

A stiletto heel is actually better on uneven surfaces, since a thicker heel increases the risk of landing the heel on two different levels of surface, while with a thin heel you'll most likely land on either one of the levels.

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13-04-2008
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Hey everyone this is helping me! I used to wear heels but got away from it after two kids, but I'm going back to my old ways with your help! Thanks and keep posting any helpgful hints.

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16-04-2008
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Reasons for not wearing high heels include:
  • they can cause foot pain
  • they can create foot deformities, including hammertoes and bunions
  • they can cause an unsteady gait
  • they can shorten the wearer's stride
  • they can render the wearer unable to run
  • The altered forces at the knee caused by walking in high heels, may predispose to degenerative changes in the knee joint
Foot and tendon problems
High-heeled shoes slant the foot forward and down while bending the toes up. The more that the feet are forced into this position, the more it may cause the Achilles tendon to shorten. This may cause problems when the wearer chooses lower heels or flat-soled shoes. When the foot slants forward, a much greater weight is transferred to the ball of the foot, increasing the likelihood of damage to the underlying soft tissue which supports the foot. In many shoes, style dictates function, either compressing the toes, or forcing them together, possibly resulting in blisters, corns, hammer toes, bunions, and many other medical conditions, most of which are permanent, and will require surgery to alleviate the pain. High heels--because they tip the foot forward-- put pressure on the lower back through making the rump push outwards and crushing the lower back vertebrae and contracting the muscles of the lower back.[3]
If it is not possible to avoid high heels altogether, some doctors suggest that the wearer wear high-heels no more often than twelve hours a day, and that they are spending at least a third of the time on their feet in contour-supportive "flat" shoes (such as exercise sandals), or well-cushioned "sneaker-type" shoes, saving high heels for special occasions.
One of the most critical problems of high-heeled-shoe design involves a properly constructed toe-box. Improper construction here can cause the most damage to one's foot. Toe-boxes which are too narrow force the toes to be "crammed" too close together. Ensuring that room exists for the toes to assume a normal separation so that high-heel wear remains an option rather than a debilitating practice, is an important issue in improving the wearability of women's high-heeled fashion shoes.
Wide heels do not necessarily offer more stability, and any raised heel with too much width, such as found in "blade-" or "block-heeled" shoes, induces unhealthy side-to-side torque to the ankles with every step, stressing them unnecessarily, while creating additional impact on the balls of the feet. Thus, the best design for a high-heel is one with a narrower width, where the heel is closer to the front, more solidly under the ankle, where the toe box provides room enough for the toes, and where forward movement of the foot in the shoe is kept in check by material snug across the instep, rather than by toes jamming together in the toe box.
Interestingly enough, despite the medical issues surrounding high-heel wear, a few podiatrists recommend well-constructed low to moderate heels for some patients. It appears a slight elevation of the heel improves the angle of contact between the metatarsals and the horizontal plane, thereby more closely approximating the proper angle and resulting in proper weight distribution of a normally-arched foot. Other foot specialists, however, argue that any heel causes unnecessary stresses on the various bones and joints of the foot.
wikipedia.com

hammer toe

foottalk.com

bunion

oxford-orth.com


keepingyouinstitches.com

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16-04-2008
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OUCH!! those pics really scare me!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmccormi View Post
I think it also depends on genetics. I, unfortunately, was "blessed" with severely flat feet, which means my feet don't arch as much as a normal foot. I did dance for 14 years, and my pointed toes never looked as pointed as the typical image of a ballerina's foot.

Similarly, your feet are forced into an arch when you wear heels. If your feet are naturally arched, this means your weight tends to distribute itself straight down into your heel and ball efficiently. But for me, my feet don't arch enough to let the bottom of my heel be perpendicular to the ground, resulting in a constant struggle to balance well in heels and not feel the pain - its like walking on a slope for me.

I'm wearing the gladiator wedges from Nine West today that look like Balenciagas, and I walked about 4 or 5 blocks in NYC and I couldn't WAIT to sit back down.
I think i may have the same problem as you, I absolutely loooooove heels but i dont feel comfortable wearing them all the time. But i think the main thing is practice..... Especially with the nine wests, i have the exact pair and my gosh they hurt like hell when i first put them on. BUt well worth it!

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16-04-2008
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I think sometimes I don't need to put on flats, but even changing into a different pair of heels helps.

Based on my experience Sunday, I was wear reasonably comfortable heels but without socks of course and they were a little loose so my feet started to sweat and rub and get blisters in them. I was working (retail) and went on my break to buy new shoes since I was dying. I ended up buying low wedges (probably 2.5 inches). My feet felt a million times better just from changing into different shoes.

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17-04-2008
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i can pretty much manage in 3 inch heels provided they are totally covered or have at least some sort of backing.
but the weird thing when i wear heels is that when i walk in heels, my face tends to like jiggle(i know it's a weird word to use, can't think of others), like maybe i have too much fats on my face (lols) and it gets quite irritating. do any of you have that problem or is it just me?

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20-04-2008
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Argh at those pics!

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20-04-2008
  25
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I started with wearing wedges, moved to low heels, and then started moving upwards. Now, I go clubbing in my 4 inch ankle boots. haha.

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20-04-2008
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I wore heels on a daily basis back in 8th grade (what was I thinking?) and then once I got into high school, where I had a lot longer to walk across campus and I have to walk down a hill to get to my bus stop, I ended up phasing them out. Not completely, I still would wear them for nice things, or wear them "just because" on occasion, but not the level that I used to. Nowadays I only wear heels for special occasions because I have really bad knees and also a back that constantly aches...so I stick for the most part with kitten heels or ballet flats. I am going to start training my feet again, but I do not want to end up with hammer toe. That pic made me .

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21-04-2008
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omg those pictures are so disgusting

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21-04-2008
  28
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Wow. Those pictures of feet. I did NOT think I'd see that when I'd opened this thread.

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22-04-2008
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Yeah, I just had bunion surgery a few months ago and my mother had combination bunion and hammer toe surgery on both feet ... foot problems are NOT pleasant ladies, so as much as we all love heels, make sure they are not causing issues!

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22-04-2008
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I just completed mt first full day in 4" heels! It took some time to get used to them again but I seem to be getting back into the swing of these heels again!

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