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26-08-2009
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thanks, those come in handy!

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26-08-2009
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Ramadan Moubarak !


always from the 70s !

* anyone with tutorials of how to drap a scarve around the head like the one in the 6th and the 7th is welcomed !!!!! *

- jalou archives -
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26-08-2009
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^ Ramadan Mubarak
wonderful scans ! thanks a lot !!



flickr/parisglobe

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26-08-2009
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found this on oyster magazine...


photoshoot titled 'daytripper'
the stylist, Laura Gorun created the turbans from designer jackets by Toni Maticevski

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28-08-2009
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Wow, I can never keep track of when Ramadan starts, lol. Happy Ramadan to everyone, though! Some beautiful hijab styles I found (and one that isn't particularly hijab, but the style is similar enough)



Hijabs High / The Ugly Earring / Creative Economy

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Last edited by gius; 06-12-2009 at 04:21 PM. Reason: please resize very large pictures.
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28-08-2009
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I love the different ways the hijab is worn and different outfits paired, but personally I like the simple, classic hijab, nothing too embellished or flashy. I think it plays along the more subtle and modesty that I feel a woman should be.

Ramadan Kareem!

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06-12-2009
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not purely "hijab" oriented, but ....

found this, thought i could share.

Quote:

THE MIDDLE EAST IN VOGUE - PART I
Fashion,
Rasha, 13 Oct 2009
Ever wonder how Vogue pulled off its extraordinary Middle East fashion shoots in the 1960’s? Dia Diwan reveals the story behind the pictures in this two part series.

Fashion magazines have always severed a dual purpose. On the one hand they are the style bibles, decimating information on the latest trends. But the most legendary of fashion tomes also had the ability to become a jewel box of ideas; transporting its readers to far off lands and exposing them to new notions of beauty.

By the 1960’s a Paris streetscape or the edge of a Palm Beach swimming pool were no longer deemed inspiring enough a backdrop for fashion shoots. Instead photographers and editors caught the travel bug and headed to exotic locations all over the globe from Africa to China. This particular fashion caravan also made its way to the Middle East. By the late 70’s and early 80’s it was not uncommon to leaf through an issue of French Elle and find models posing amongst traditional architecture in Bahrain or leading a heard of camels just outside Kuwait City. By the 1990’s Morocco and Egypt became the destinations of choice for editors at Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. Christy Turlington in futuristic Claude Montana lounging in the Moorish splendor of a Marrakech palace; or Linda Evangelista perched precariously from the edge of a felucca plying the Nile, became indelible fashion images in the last decade.

To be sure, fashion’s fascination with the Arab world could be traced as far back as the 1920’s and 30’s when couturiers such as Madame Lanvin and Elsa Schiaparelli would vacation in Egypt and Tunis; bringing back with them fragments of inspiration. That tradition continues on today with designers as diverse as John Galliano, Alexander McQueen and Ricardo Tisci at Givenchy, who have visited Cairo and Damascus to research new collections.

But despite such early precedents, fashion magazines didn’t start venturing into the Middle East until the start of the 1960’s when the invention of the jet plane suddenly made far flung locations such as Katmandu and Afghanistan accessible to a new generation. No where was this new spirit of internationalism more pronounced than in the pages of 1960’s Vogue under the direction of its legendary editor-in-chief Diana Vreeland.

During her editorial reign at Vogue, Vreeland would dispatch her favorite photographer Henry Clarke to Iran in 1969 to shoot model Marisa Berenson amongst the tiled domes of Isfahan, wearing Halston and Geoffrey Beene. But in addition to the expansive fashion spreads, the magazine would carry reports on the latest gallery openings and chic boutiques in Tehran, as well as profiles of the capital’s bright young things; while British Airways would regularly advertise amongst Vogue’s pages non-stop flights from London to Tehran.

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06-12-2009
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THE MIDDLE EAST IN VOGUE - PART II
.....

Quote:
To Diana Vreeland, the “Middle East” meant history, magic, atmosphere and exoticism. Yet capturing these portraits of models in far flung locations required a certain amount of preparation and the logistics were tricky. It meant contacting key figures, pulling strings, doing research and acquiring all kinds of cooperation that wasn’t always forthcoming.
Vreeland herself never went on these trips, but ran the show from her expansive office at Vogue headquarters in New York.

For every shoot in a far off location cables would fly back and forth across the ocean to reserve hotel rooms, buy plane tickets, hire car drivers or even mules or camels for transportation, and to arrange for shipping the clothes, which were sent in long black boxes called “coffins”.

Vreeland controlled the photography in New York as best she could through a technique known in the business as “Polaroiding.” Every photograph was planned by her creative New York office team in advance, with a model posing in a dress or coat with the desired combination of accessories: bracelets, necklaces and hats. Only the background was missing. The “Polaroid” was then given to the photographer and editors on the shoot, with instructions scribbled on the bottom. Vreeland would write something like “you do this with hat or without hat,” so that her directions would follow her staff even if she couldn’t.

In 1965 Vreeland pared the photographer Henry Clarke with the whimsical writer Lesley Blanch (both of whom were Middle East enthusiasts), and sent them on a Vogue adventure to Syria and Jordan. But far from living in relative luxury, they slept in tents during the evenings and posed models against camels during the day. In her accompanying piece “Match Me Such Marvel” a rhapsody on Middle Eastern themes, Blanch evoked the unique character of the region, “with its hospitality, amazing wildlife, great natural beauty and ancient history”.

Susan Train, the Paris editor at American Vogue, was often part of the Vogue team on these expeditions. In charge of styling the shoots she recalled of that particular trip: “You’d take a couple of models, the photographer Henri Clarke, his English assistant Nelson and a hairdresser (usually Olivier a French coiffeur from Alexandre in Paris) and off we went for say three to four weeks to Syria and Jordan. And then we’re sending these pictures off to New York to be developed.”

The final result, which appeared in the December issue, was a tantalizing fashion story of constant contradictions. A bronzed model boldly posed between the columns and arches of ancient ruins at Palmyra; swathed in an ivory silk crepe dress by Oscar de la Renta; while another model appeared dramatically posed in front of Petra’s architectural marvels in a gilded cage dress by Anne Fogarty.

This “adventure” with all its mishaps and Herculean effort on the part of the entire Vogue team was, at the end of the day, undertaken to show off clothes by Pauline Trigere, Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta. All of whom were located oceans away in New York.
www.diadiwan.com
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06-12-2009
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and something which carries on the subject ....


vintage fashion magazines
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12-12-2009
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very interesting read thanks for sharing.

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12-12-2009
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can i just jump in here and say that this was one of the most eductional/interesting threads i've read in TFS? i worry about sounding too 'anthropological' and 'fetishy' and 'naieve' by being so enthused about it, but obviously the american media does NOT do a great job of giving us an idea of life and style of islamic and/or middle eastern women, beyond, like, maybe those of us who have read marjane satrapi...

in reading i know some idiotic comments have been made here, but for the most part i thought it was really, really interesting and inspiring and cool. the image/idea we often get of hijab is of women who are 'oppressed' or 'abused' or 'sad', and -- anyones politics and personal opinions on traditions entirely aside -- it's wonderful to see that this is also something that can be very beautiful and stylish within that context and to see how people work with/embrace/express themselves despite religious/political/social "constraints" of their society or religion.

i also thought it was awesome bringing up rick owens -- i am obsessed with all his druid hoodies from the drkshdw lines, and a lot of things from complex geometries etc, and have been wearing an awful lot of hooded/flowing things lately and never even THOUGHT about the fact that this is obviously 'fashion' that 'works' in that context!

ok, gushing rant over, carry on

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17-12-2009
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glad you like it definitely one of the more interesting threads this section, if i do say so myself


Does anyone know what it is on her head? Is it a type of jewellery The woman at the top
http://forums.thefashionspot.com/att...1&d=1260119842

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23-12-2009
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^to be sincere, i'm not sure it's a woman access.
the credit says costume of Lawrence d'Arabie .... and this is indeed what he wears in the movie.
so ...

here are some qatari young women (illustrating an article from figaro.fr)
i'm just posting the ones wearing the traditional outfit ...

Deena Abu-Issa, Hamida Al-Kawari and Iman Al-Kawari

madame.lefigaro.fr

* the article is interesting, but in french ........ *
should i post a translation ?
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23-12-2009
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Quote:
Qatar: the women pass to the action

In the tread of Sheikha Mozah, the wife of the emir of Qatar, the women of this richissime Gulf State break the taboos, assert themselves in the business… and open the way of an Islam of the Lights.

Appeared the 11.12.2009, by our special correspondent, Dalila Kerchouche
(1/4)
At it, all is vertiginous. Its heels. Its silhouette. Its skyscrapers. Its ambition. Sheikha Mozah Bint Nasser Al Missned, the sculptural one and charismatic wife of the emir of Qatar, sees high, and far. For it, and its country, State confetti of the Persian Gulf and seat of the chain Al-Jazeera, which wants to be anti-Dubai. At the end of November in Doha, it is with a spectacular show with American that it inaugurated the WISE (1) (“wise” in French), the first Davos of education with thousand personalities come from one hundred twenty country - presidents of university, ministers or women of influence, such Carla Brown-Sarkozy and Irina Bokova, managing director of UNESCO…
Simple stake of image? Not only. Because when atypical First Lady in abaya black (traditional veil which covers it foot in course), goes up to the platform, the whole room quivers. “The right to education is in a state of brain death in the world”, denounces it, by reaffirming the urgency to counter the “threats obscurantists”. In particular in the Arab countries: a woman on two is illiterate there.
If many Arab leaders always do not use the resources of their countries for the general interest, nourishing frustrations and the extremism, Qatar, large like Corsica but equipped with the third gas world reserve, massively invests its petrodollars to educate its inhabitants, in particular the women. The wife of the emir in made her combat. In fifteen years, the only princess of the Gulf, with the Rania queen of Jordan, to show itself as a public, upset the statute of the women. Yesterday confined with their hearth, today working girls ambitious, they are the “generation Sheikha Mozah”.

While a forest of cranes are activated with far, setting up bluish skyscrapers which give to Doha an air of Manhattan of the desert, Deena, 25 years, gracile at the wheel of its Arranges Rover, crosses the city in waterspout by listening to a compil Buddha-Bar. Later, Louboutin with the feet, this graduate in international business surveys the building site of its future restaurant, 191 square meters of white marble located in the “evil” (shopping mall) of his/her father, Salam Plaza. Especially, do not speak to him about the charms of idleness. “My God! Never of the life! exclaim it. Thanks to Sheikha Mozah, we are the first generation of active women in Qatar. I feel a little the heart of the pioneers who, like my grandfather, built empires in the desert. ”
Qataries return by far. Fifteen years ago, in this rigorous country, which practises Islam wahhabite (near to that of the Saoudis) and governed by the charia (Islamic law), their fate was not distinguished from their Saoudi or Iranian, identical neighbors phantom blacks cloîtrées at them in prisons of luxury. But in 1995, the new emir Ahmad ibn Khalifa Al-Thani puts the course on modernity, influenced by his “third” wife - actually First Lady official. The women then obtain the right to inherit the ground, to vote and be elected.
Sheikha Mozah opens centers of calls for the beaten women. And even if it means to irritate the most preserving members of the royal family, it multiplies public appearances. “As the emir supported it, nobody dared to protest openly, tells Malika Benlarbi, sub-prefect's wife in Paris and close to Sheikha Mozah. She showed with her people that a woman could be Moslem and active. ”

Especially, this couple of monarchs enlightened autocrats but builds schools, makes the schooling free and obligatory until the end of the college. Today, the rate of elimination of illiteracy of the girls passes very close to the 90%. With the funds of powerful Qatar Foundation, which it chairs, Sheikha Mozah builds an ultramodern campus of 1.000 hectares, baptized Education City, where it founds co-education. “At the beginning, when Profs raised a question, the coeds did not dare to answer, remembers the person in charge of education. Four years later, they leave there transformed, opened out, sure of them. And claim even the microphone! ”
Today, this graduate news unloads on the job market. Helped by the “qatarisation” of the economy, launched in 1996, which forces all the foreign companies to recruit and form a quota of natives, they invest the media, finance, industry. Remain that these evolutions run up against the conservatism of certain families. “For me, it is a double challenge, explains Mariam, 26 years, journalist in Qatar News Agency. I must face the men of my family, my uncles and my brothers, who fear that I do not become “unstable” while working. And my superiors, who refused that I go on the ground. To only defer drafting, I prove to them, each day, that a woman is equalizes it of a man. ”
These resistances tend to disappear in younger sectors, like new technologies: “When I started to work, I did not dare to speak with my male colleagues, tells Zeina, 28 years, marketing manager at Meeza, specialized company in the high-tech. I believed them preserving. But makes some, at all! They also aspired to modernity. ” Because in this country where Qataris account for only 20% of the population, to promote the women is also a manner, for them, to keep the seizure on their economy.

But this “generation Sheikha Mozah” especially dreams to undertake. Faggots of ideas and energy, they innovate. Sara, 24 years, polyglot (she speaks four languages) and set on mode, will launch, next March, a mark of ready-made clothes, baptized Toujouri. Iman, 35 years, mother of three children, imported an American concept of artistic awakening for the children. Installed in Villaggio, the “evil” more attended of Doha, this “momprenor” - it created its company when it was pregnant - opened his company where it directs six paid: “Of the design to the plates, I carried out all myself, tell it. I worked seven days out of seven, without one day off. ”
However, in this company in full change, of the bolts still resist: the girls live in their parents until their weddings, polygamy remains legal - although rare at the young people - and freedom of expression, non-existent. Nevertheless, manners evolve/move little by little. The Middle Age of the marriage of the girls moved back in the 22 year old neighbourhoods, against 18 years before the years 2000. And they can choose unites to them.
To continue the combat: such is also the ambition of Hamida, 21 years, which dreams to become “Arab Oprah Winfrey”. In October, it animated with brilliance first Tribeca Festival of Doha, inspired by the New Yorkean festival created by Robert De Niro, who was held with the museum of Islamic Arts of Doha. In 2010, it will launch its webmagazine on YouTube, “to carry the voice of the Arab women”. “At the bottom, it continues, we look for a way which reconciles our faith and our personal blooming. ” Because between the islamist vice and the emancipation with Western, Qataries try to invent a third way, a kind of Islam of the Lights. Here, perhaps, the true revolution of Qatar: by incarnating a “islamo-compatible” modernity, Sheikha Mozah makes a success of with ringardiser the integrism. And the hope gives again, by rebound, with all the society women Arab.

i've just noticed sometimes babelfish translated "elle" (she) by "it" ... sorry.
was sort of lazy to correct it .........
and "mall" (a word that doesn't exist in french) was translated by "evil" ... so no Salam is not "evil" ... it's just a small mall ...... lol
same source


Last edited by BerlinRocks; 23-12-2009 at 06:59 AM.
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23-12-2009
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The translation seems very off to me and a bit "funny". Doesnt read really well.

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