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04-11-2011
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You are welcome! I wasn't even interested in the story when I read the draft of the synopsis but the more they talk about it the more it sounds like she did, as always, an incredible job and the movie might even be as good as she is

 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kobro22 View Post
Ammarra thanks so much for the interview, so fantastic to see that the roll out for Young Adult has begun, my excited and hope for this movie is building!!
I'm excited as well, have to say the trailer did not grab me, but i have more hope after reading these articles.

 
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zimbio
[img]http://i48.************/u/f48/11/78/63/65/theron10.jpg[/img][img]http://i48.************/u/f48/11/78/63/65/theron11.jpg[/img]
[img]http://i48.************/u/f48/11/78/63/65/theron12.jpg[/img]

Charlize Theron's Airline Handler has a "slip" of the hand while she prepares to depart LAX (Los Angeles International airport).
November 5, 2011

 
06-11-2011
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^ love her bag.

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I love the bag and jacket - the collar looks really interesting

 
08-11-2011
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Screening of "Young Adult" - November 01st



diariotwilight

 
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so simple outfit...and she looks divine...

 
08-11-2011
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Credit : the wrap
Capone reviews the exceptional YOUNG ADULT, from director Jason Reitman and writer Diablo Cody!!! Sound like JUNO? It isn't.
Quote:
For many, YOUNG ADULT is going to be an exercise in defying expectations. You'd be surprised how many people like or dislike a film based on their preconceived ideas of what it is they're walking into, based on such things as trailers, word of mouth, reviews, etc. If a movie isn't "what they expected," they somehow think that's the basis for judging its worth. And often they punish a film in their minds because it didn't live up to some internal standard that has little to do with its actual entertainment value. Here's an idea: walk into a movie with zero expectations; walk in open minded, able to let the film wash over you and, dare I say, surprise you in the process. It's a great thing, trust me.

Case in point, we have YOUNG ADULT, which has a pedigree that would make it very easy to have certain expectations about the kind of film it is. It comes from the writer (the Oscar-winning Diablo Cody) and director (Jason Reitman) of JUNO, so you might expect a light-hearted comedy with snappy dialogue and a few moments of seriousness to drive home its deeper messages. Not only would you be 1000 percent wrong, but you'd be selling YOUNG ADULT seriously short on just about every level. Anchored by a pair of performances that are among the year's best, surprisingly sophisticated dialogue, and a subject matter that is unsettling, with touches of humor, this movie achieves moments and takes us on such a nakedly personal journey that it feels almost death defying for its characters.

Perhaps to directly address the idea of a female writer who seems slightly fixated on the lives of teenagers, Cody forgoes dialogue that sounds like her attempting to invent catch phrases and makes her lead character Mavis Gary (Charlize Theron) a writer of fiction for young adults, living in the big city (well, Minneapolis). But her publisher has decided that the successful series she's been working on for years should come to an end and has charged Mavis with writing her final installment. Somehow, this triggers her desire to return to her hometown in northern Minnesota and try to recapture a time in her life when she believes she was at her best--her high school years when she was dating a handsome young man named Buddy Slade.

If memory serves, our first image of Mavis is lying face down in bed in her small, messy apartment. It's almost impossible to imagine Theron as unattractive (but if you've seen MONSTER, you know she can walk that line when she wants to), but seeing her wake up after a night of hard drinking is not a pretty sight. What's fascinating is watching her get ready for a night out and going on a date she couldn't give two ****s about. The hair, makeup and clothes belong to a woman who has grown up being the prettiest, most desired girl most of her life, and she's clearly grown bored of how easy men are to figure out and impress. Theron gets to be more showy later in the film, but in these early scenes, we begin to realize that she's about to unveil a character the likes of which she has never played, and that opens up a world of possibilities.

Her trip to her hometown is actually triggered by a mass email from Buddy announcing the birth of his new child. She interprets the email as a cry for help aimed directly at her. We know early on that Mavis is a bit delusional, but that doesn't stop her from throwing clothes in a suitcase and heading home for the first time since high school. When in town, she runs into Matt Freehauf (Patton Oswalt), who went to high school with Mavis, but she doesn't really remember him until she recalls that he was the victim of a misdirected hate crime (jocks beat him up because they thought he was gay and permanently damaged his leg so that he walks with a cane).

Because the characters is played by Oswalt, we presume he'll be the film's comic relief, and he certainly does provide some insight into Mavis' plan to seduce Buddy away from his wife. But what Oswalt accomplishes here as an actor has only been tapped on rare occasions in the past, in particular his revelatory work in BIG FAN two years ago. But as the film goes on, the depth to which that beating changed the course of Matt's life is revealed and provides some of the film's most devastating scenes. I'm not big on talking about awards in my reviews, but I would love to see Oswalt get an Oscar nomination for this role. Late in the film when Theron is questioning whether there is anything about her to love, Oswalt delivers a line that just crushed me. But credit also goes to Cody, who perfectly captures in a single sentence the curious relationship between the pretty, popular girls and the boys who will forever admire them but never attempt to win their hearts.

A great deal of the mid-section of YOUNG ADULT focuses on Mavis' embarrassing attempt to win back Buddy, played as an adult by Patrick Wilson (Little Children, Watchmen). Twilight's Elizabeth Reaser is Buddy's wife, Beth, who seems to almost take pity on Mavis' plight, while her friends (many of which were also high school acquaintances) are the ones who are especially nasty to Mavis for what she's trying to do. During this entire period, Mavis is furiously plugging away at her book, which seems to incorporate into its plot a lot of what is happening to her right now. Cody cleverly turns these events into a messy high school reunion, which in turn fuels Mavis' creative juices, and makes it clear that the reason Mavis is so good at writing for teens is that she never really stopped being one.

What strikes you about Theron's portrayal of Mavis is that she manages to make us care and root for a character who is more often than not a deplorable human being. Without giving too much away, what's even more shocking about YOUNG ADULT is that when the film is done, we're pretty much convinced that Mavis has not experienced a big, life-altering change. She certainly more aware of her shortcomings, but hasn't really made any progress toward being a better person. That's a gutsy move, but not unlike the ending of Reitman's last film, UP IN THE AIR, with George Clooney staring at that departure/arrival board with a clearer understanding of why he will never form any meaningful relationships, but still ready to continue the life that got him there.

I haven't talked much about Reitman's work, and that's because his greatest achievement on YOUNG ADULT is letting the strength of the material and his actors to the work for him. I'm sure upon watching the film a couple more times that I'll see more of his imprint on the work, but upon first viewing, it seems he's taking a minimalist approach to his visual style and concentrating more on extract the best performances possible from his cast. Sometimes, that's all it takes, and I applaud his restraint.

The real surprise about YOUNG ADULT is that it's not actually a movie about an unhinged woman trying to win back her ex-boyfriend (well, that's not ALL it's about). It's primarily a strange little love story about a one-time class beauty and a quiet little man who assembles action figures and lives with his sister (a scene stealing Collette Wolfe). But the real eye-opening thing about this movie how determined it is not to be any one thing or fit neatly into a genre; I find that ferociously refreshing. And back to my original point, I love that nothing that Reitman, Cody, Theron, or Oswalt has done to this point has quite prepared us for what they accomplish with YOUNG ADULT, a deftly smart and sometimes unnerving work that takes us down unpredictable roads and thrives in its dark corners. It simultaneously reminds us of the best and worst parts of the human soul, and shows us that a lot of people use both in order to get through the day. This is a great movie that doesn't use the usual tricks to show us how great it is. The film opens December 16.

Jason Reitman, Charlize Theron Sneak 'Young Adult' Narcissism
Published: November 02, 2011 @ 9:54 pm

Quote:
Paramount has been sneaking screenings of “Young Adult,” Jason Reitman’s droll new film that could be a black comedy, but then again could be an outright tragedy merely punctuated with moments of hilarity.

The sneaks are probably a good idea, because this is not the kind of film that you just want to throw out there. It’s certainly darker than any of Reitman’s previous work, including the ingeniously misanthropic “Thank You For Smoking,” and as noted, it’s kind of hard to categorize.

But it’s daring. The film, written by Diablo Cody (“Juno”), is the story of the narcissistic and needy Mavis Gary, played by Charlize Theron, who heads back to her small hometown of Mercury, Minn., to reclaim the heart of her high school flame (Patrick Wilson).

Except: He’s happily married and a newly-minted father. Mavis doesn’t care, or even much notice. So basically Reitman invites you to hate his main character, and Theron plays the heartless, hollow Mavis without flinching. She drinks whiskey incessantly, and manages to make even hate crimes pale in comparison to her crisis of self-absorption.

The movie screened on Tuesday night to a jam-packed crowd of curious cinephiles at the New Beverly theater in West Hollywood.

They’d been invited to a “secret screening” and the secret was soon out: Reitman was there, as was star Theron, chewing gum and towering over the guy everyone was really talking about, Patton Oswalt.

Oswalt plays a crippled high school acquaintance of Mavis named Matt, and gets most of the laughs in the film for being the truth-teller and voice of conscience. Namely, Matt keeps reminding her to stop trying to ruin the marriage of the happily-married Wilson. She ignores him, but meanwhile Matt is her only friend.

Oswalt had the entire audience in stitches during the Q&A after the screening. recounting the first table reading where Theron took her unlikeable character to the mat.

Reitman and Theron both shocked the room by noting that his direction at one point consisted of telling his lead actress to produce a “c---ier” face. (You’re just going to have to figure that one out. Can’t even write it.) Diablo Cody seemed to get a charge out of the whole thing. And she admitted that Mavis is at least partially based on her.

In a season where there’s been few clear front-runners for the Oscar race, “Young Adult” may have an interesting journey. The film is probably on the dark side for many Academy voters, but Reitman is an undeniable talent who is building a body of work of smart, accomplished films that have something to say. This is another one of those.

Let’s hope “Young Adult” gets to make its way to maturity.

 
08-11-2011
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Credit : Hitfixcom ; aintitcool.com ; Lady charlize ; TheWrap
Some more reviews and pictures of Charlize arriving at Heathrow.

Review: 'Young Adult' offers misanthropic comedy with great roles for Theron, Oswalt
YOU COULD CALL IT THE ANTI-'JUNO'
By Drew McWeeny

Quote:
Wow. Talk about mixing it up.

I think "Juno" gets a bum rap, which is a funny thing to say about a film that was both financially successful and critically awarded. It's true, though. People beat up on the film in a reductive way, as if the only thing of note about it is the pop culture that seems to be the primary vocabulary of today's youth and that was so much of a part of the way the characters in that film defined themselves when speaking.

I've always thought the second half of "Juno" is the better half, the stuff that deals with the way reality can often be at odds with the image we have of someone, and I think the best parts of "Jennifer's Body" are the parts that get at some difficult, hard-to-discuss truths about the way women are pitted against each other in our culture and the way it can distort their notions of friendship, even amidst the blood and guts.

With this film, Diablo Cody's voice finds its most refined presentation so far, stripped of anything you might be able to dismiss as a gimmick, and I think it will surprise anyone who thinks they have Cody or director Jason Reitman totally figured out. Mavis Gary, played by Charlize Theron, is a character that tests any conventional wisdom about what is considered acceptable as the lead in a movie. She's a fairly empty person, awful and unable to understand or respect or reproduce normal social behavior. She is the ghostwriter of a series of young adult books about high school, and one of the reasons she's been so good at writing them is because she has never really allowed herself to mature past the person she was at what she sees as her own best moment, her high school years.

So when an e-mail arrives for her one morning announcing the birth of the baby of Buddy Slade and his wife Beth, it's like a punch in the face for Mavis. After all, Buddy (Patrick Wilson) was hers first, and that baby should have also been hers. It's enough to set off a crisis for Mavis, who decides that she's going to "rescue" Buddy from his marriage by returning home to her small town and making herself available. She knows that's all it will take to ensure that Buddy will leave with her, finally free of the life that trapped him and the woman who tricked him into marriage.

Charlize Theron is stunning in the role of Mavis, and most of what I found most impressive about the performance is the attention to small detail, the way she inhabits the skin of Mavis without apologizing for her or trying to smooth away the rough edges of the character as imagined by Cody. One of the things that is very true about Hollywood and the way films get made is that actors are often afraid to play people who are truly unlikeable. The bigger the star, the more likely it is that they're going to balk at playing something that will make the audience hate them. That's not to say that they shy away from bad guys or villains entirely, but they'll always find a way to inject some sort of grace note, something that redeems the person. Theron apparently didn't get that memo, because Mavis is a richly detailed, carefully observed piece of ****. She is emotionally damaged, and she doesn't seem even moderately interested in getting better. She wants what she wants, no matter what, and she has no thoughts of others that do not in some way involve what she wants from them.

Once she shows up in her small hometown, she runs into Matt Freehauf (Patton Oswalt), or as she refers to him, "the hate-crime guy." He was brutalized in high school at one point, and he's been dealing with the emotional and physical scars ever since. From the trailers, I imagined he would end up being the hilarious sounding board to Charlize, eventually helping her towards some important self-realization, because that's the way that role would unfold in any typical cliched version of this story. If you want to see Oswalt in a more conventional use of his talents, check him in the opening scenes from "A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas." That's the acerbic profane razor-sharp comic that we're used to. Matt is something else. He's the guy who had the locker next to Mavis all through high school, and he remembers a very different version of her than the one she believes. He lives with his sister Sandra (Collette Wolfe), and he's a private person, a guy who carved a safe and quiet life for himself out of some pretty awful circumstances. He is a sounding board to Mavis while she's in town, but very few of their scenes end with punchlines. He's got nothing to lose when it comes to Mavis, and so he speaks to her without any filter, without any reservation. The relationship that develops between them is blunt and based largely on alcohol and frank talk, and I really love the energy of the scenes between them.

Patrick Wilson is also really strong in the movie, and I love the way Cody's written Buddy Slade. The name suggests a guy who encapsulates everything awful about small-town high school, like he'd be one of the bad teens from "Stand By Me" or "Christine." But as played by Wilson, he's a normal guy, comfortable in his work, deeply connected to his family, happy in his marriage. His wife Beth is played by Elizabeth Reaser, and she's lovely in the movie, warm and grounded, a perfect match for Buddy. Even in the few moments we see from their marriage, there's a real life suggested, a great contrast to the daily routine that seems to be killing Mavis at the beginning of the film.

I watched most of the film gripped by a sort of full-body cringe, horrified by what was happening. I think there's an almost unbearable amount of tension involved in the idea that we're watching this delusional, miserable ******* sweep back into the lives of people who are long since done with her, wreaking havoc without any sense of self-awareness. She is Godzilla, stomping her way through an emotional Tokyo, and I particularly loved the way she would channel her real-life frustrations into the book she's working on. It's hard to have a character in a film be a writer and to create convincing examples of their work within the work. Here, Cody absolutely nails the tone of the "Sweet Valley High" fare she's poking fun at, and I can see why Mavis would have been just right to write dozens of these books. Her arrested adolescence is enabled by her work, encouraged even, and she has a voice that is perfect for the protagonist of the series. The idea that the series is coming to a close is a undercurrent to this crisis, something that's driving her to reckless actions in the real world to make up for the loss of this fantasy world where she's been able to keep living this moment.

Special mention must be made of Collette Wolfe, who has been doing very good work in films like "The Foot Fist Way," "Observe and Report," and on shows like "Cougar Town" as well. But here, she gives one of those supporting performances that make you reassess them completely, and in two short scenes, she suggests an entire life of desire and repressed feeling and furious sublimation. Mavis spends this entire film talking about how she's making this romantic gesture and she's doing something brave by reaching out to the person she's always felt like she should be with, and when she's confronted with the real thing, someone actually doing that, she doesn't recognize it at all. Wolfe's big scene really is the beating heart of the film, a human moment that still doesn't excuse or subdue the toxic nature of Mavis and her journey. That's not easy, and it is impressive in the writing, the directing, and the performances from all involved.

"Young Adult" is not an easy film. It's not a pleasant film. But I think it's a pretty great film, and the best way to approach it is by dropping all expectation of what it is "supposed" to be. I wish I didn't recognize any of myself in Mavis Gary, and I wish I didn't understand the wildly self-destructive qualities that define her. I think the film reaches for something very dark and hard and real, and the degree to which it accomplishes that is impressive. I can imagine "Young Adult" will be intensely disliked by just as many people as it is loved by, and that's a sign of just how uncompromised it is.
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08-11-2011
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She looks just classy at Heathrow!
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^ I know right. Even her hair is tucked in perfectly. I so want her booties.

I like her tanned Muse. Anyone know the ID of the black bag?

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I guess it's safe to say that Young Adult will be her mini-comeback. And with Prometheus coming out, too!

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08-11-2011
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Originally Posted by LolaSvelt View Post
I guess it's safe to say that Young Adult will be her mini-comeback. And with Prometheus coming out, too!
I would say Prometheus is her mini come back, Mad Max will be the HUGE one. YA seems more to me like a way to showcase her talent as an actress more than her star power It will probably put her back on the map a bit for critics and fans but not really for the general public... I also don't see the movie taking the usual promotional route (and I am glad for it).
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Can't wait for that new movie.
nice look at airport

 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ammarra View Post
I would say Prometheus is her mini come back, Mad Max will be the HUGE one. YA seems more to me like a way to showcase her talent as an actress more than her star power It will probably put her back on the map a bit for critics and fans but not really for the general public... I also don't see the movie taking the usual promotional route (and I am glad for it).
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Well I kind of meant comeback in terms of critical acclaim. Besides, it could be a sleeper hit. Keep in mind, this is Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody teaming up together for the first time since Juno.

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