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Saoirse Ronan
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Originally Posted by lelaid View Post
Does anyone know who her stylist is? She's really been kicking things up a notch this season!
Elizabeth Saltzer.

Add her to the very select few who can pull off a topknot.

Actress Saoirse Ronan at the Santa Barbara Award Honoring Saoirse Ronan Presented By UGG during The 33rd Santa Barbara International Film Festival at Arlington Theatre on February 4, 2018 in Santa Barbara, California.










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Great look! She's adorable.

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Actor Saoirse Ronan attends the 90th Annual Academy Awards Nominee Luncheon at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on February 5, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.










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How to Come of Age Onscreen? Saoirse Ronan and Timothée Chalamet Know

“Want to know what I call him?” Saoirse Ronan asked, pointing at Timothée Chalamet, who had just joined us at the table and was shrugging off his coat. “Pony,” the actress said, “Because he’ll come up to Greta and me and nuzzle us.”

“Greta” is the screenwriter and director Greta Gerwig, making it a high-class stable: All three are nominated for an Oscar at this year’s Academy Awards. And as if on cue, Mr. Chalamet lowered his head like a baby foal and nestled it gently beneath Ms. Ronan’s jaw. “It’s quite disarming,” she said with a laugh. “My Pretty Pony!”

Born to Irish parents in the Bronx but raised in Ireland, Ms. Ronan, 23, began acting professionally at 7. Her breakthrough came in the film adaptation of Ian McEwan’s novel “Atonement” when she was 13. Critics were awed by her performance, and she was nominated for an Academy Award for best supporting actress, making her one of the youngest nominees in history. In 2015, her portrayal of a homesick Irish girl in the period drama “Brooklyn” won her a second nomination, this time in the best actress category. She made her Broadway debut the following year in Ivo van Hove’s production of “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller.

This month, Ms. Ronan won a Golden Globe and was nominated for her third Academy Award, for best actress, in “Lady Bird,” Ms. Gerwig’s bittersweet coming-of-age film, in which Ms. Ronan plays a compellingly eccentric senior at a Catholic girls’ school. The film received five Oscar nominations, including best picture and best director for Ms. Gerwig.

Mr. Chalamet, 22, also appears in “Lady Bird,” as a very bad boyfriend of Ms. Ronan’s character. But it is for his heartbreaking turn in Luca Guadagnino’s coming-of-age film “Call Me by Your Name,” about a summer romance between two young men, that Mr. Chalamet has won raves, as well numerous nods on the awards circuit, including an Academy Award nomination for best actor.
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Complete coverage of the movie awards season from our reporters, editors and critics.

Like Ms. Ronan, Mr. Chalamet was born in New York. He graduated from Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts in 2013. Along with roles on the television series “Homeland” and in the films “Men, Women & Children” and “Interstellar,” he starred in the Off Broadway production of John Patrick Shanley’s play “Prodigal Son,” for which he won the Lucille Lortel Award for lead actor in a play.

Over lunch this month, two days after the Golden Globes ceremony and two weeks before the Academy Award nominations were announced, at Il Cantinori restaurant in Greenwich Village (shrimp scampi for Ms. Ronan and roast salmon for Mr. Chalamet), the pair discussed the eternal lure of coming-of-age films, the nostalgia (and worries) of young people, #MeToo on the red carpet and needing a break.

PHILIP GALANES Favorite coming-of-age films. Go!

SAOIRSE RONAN “Dirty Dancing.” Is that coming-of-age?

PG Why not? Baby becomes an adult.

SR I love the way the women support each other. And “Rebel Without a Cause.” There’s a romance there, but it feels more platonic. I didn’t realize, until “Lady Bird” came along, how starved we are for female coming-of-age stories that don’t revolve around a girl being validated by romance.

TIMOTHÉE CHALAMET The one that took hold of me was a book, “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” which was made into a movie later. It’s written in a way that only a young person could speak. And the unabashed lostness of the protagonist …

SR Exactly. I love them because you can see elements of yourself in them.

PG When I was a kid, coming-of-age films — like “Pretty in Pink,” “The Breakfast Club” — normalized the march to adulthood. They made it safe. And I was a worrier.

SR So are we. We’ve talked about that before.

PG What do you worry about?

TC When you get to act in things as good as “Lady Bird” or “Call Me by Your Name,” you’ve got a huge responsibility to do them truthfully. So that young people watching can say, “I see myself on that screen!” What if I can’t do it?

SR Every time I act, I worry: Can I do it again?

TC That’s always at the forefront of my brain.

SR And every time I finish a job, I feel like, “Oh God, I got away with that one.” Plus, I’m a people-pleaser. I don’t like upsetting anyone. But I’ve gotten to a point in my work where I need to stand firmly with decisions I’ve made or feel free to go in another direction — even if everyone around me is telling me to do the opposite. It’s hard.

PG Let me ask about acting. You both have incredibly expressive faces, transmitting complex feelings in a nonverbal way. Do you know how you do it? Is it innate or craft?

SR Well, there’s definitely a practice. The more you do it, the more open you are to accessing feelings. But you know, sometimes you see little kids onscreen, and it’s just amazing how open and uninhibited they are.

PG I’m thinking of you — and your eyes — in “Atonement.”

SR And I hadn’t had any training or even life experience at that stage.

PG Are you better on the 13th take, Timothée?

TC As Armie [Hammer, Mr. Chalamet’s co-star in “Call Me by Your Name”] says, “I wear my heart on my sleeve.” That argues for innateness, I guess. But the greatest lesson for me in drama school was failing, time after time. In my sophomore year, I struggled with this one scene. I never did it right. It was always bad.

PG What was it?

TC It was from “The Graduate.”

PG You were playing Dustin Hoffman?

TC I was playing Benjamin. But as bad as I was, there was a release that came with the failure. It let me stretch a little more, try something else. It didn’t make me any better necessarily, but it gave me more freedom in my head.

SR Some stage actors have difficulty when they come back to film. The camera can paralyze them. But I love knowing that the camera is watching me and what it needs to see. That’s when craft develops. But I still come back to that childlike sensibility when I act — to be completely in it and give myself up to it.

TC One of my favorite scenes in “Call Me by Your Name” is the morning after Elio and Oliver have made love for the first time, and there’s this weird tension that develops. There was some dialogue, and we tried it a few times. Then we tried it without the lines. And it works so much better that way because it’s unclear. It invites the viewer to figure out what the characters are going through.

SR My favorite, favorite thing is not to speak.

PG Walking home, after your films, I started humming “Sugar Mountain,” this old Neil Young song about a boy who can’t go to his favorite club anymore because it’s just for teenagers, and he’s turned 20. Your films let you feel nostalgic for childhood.

TC You know what’s weird? My favorite moment in my film is one I shouldn’t be able to relate to: when Michael Stuhlbarg, who plays my father, says, “As for our bodies, there comes a time when no one wants to come near them.” That moment shatters me.

SR What these films have in common — even that scene — is that each moment is so big for the young person experiencing it that they don’t have time to process it properly before it’s gone. That’s the heartbreaking thing about childhood. It’s only at the end you go, “Oh, I wasn’t ready for this to be over yet.”

PG There are two uncannily parallel scenes in your movies: Your characters are on emotional overload — Elio has just said goodbye to his lover, Lady Bird has lost her virginity to Timmy’s character — and they both fall apart, in cars, with their mothers.

More: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/31/a...your-name.html
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Amazing!

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Saoirse Ronan attends AARP's 17th Annual Movies For Grownups Awards at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on February 5, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California.








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She's looking incredible lately, especially the last two. I want her in more Narciso Rodriguez.

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Feb 08 | Graham Norton Show




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#SaoirseRonan in @gucci and @eltonjohn archive on the cover of AnOther Magazine S/S18⠀



#SaoirseRonan in @gucci on the cover of AnOther Magazine S/S18⠀


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Quote:
I hear the giggling before I get to the door of the suite in the Soho hotel in London, where I’m meeting Greta Gerwig, 34, and Saoirse Ronan, 23 — both “women of the moment” thanks to Gerwig’s much-hyped debut solo directorial film, Lady Bird. It’s a damp, cold Saturday evening and the pair haven’t seen each other since filming wrapped on the movie several months earlier. Right now, they’re sitting face to face, intertwined, on the sofa and holding hands. Legs tucked beneath them, they talk intensely and at a hundred miles an hour, Gerwig in her languid Californian drawl and Ronan in a — surprisingly broad — Irish brogue. It takes a good five minutes for them to stop reminiscing about their time on set and gossiping about recent projects and who has seen who since the movie wrapped and even notice I’m in the room.


Warm, engaging and positive, they both confess the experience of making Lady Bird was “very special” to them; indeed, it’s hard to overstate the critical reaction to this coming-of-age movie. (The notoriously acerbic host of The Late Show, Stephen Colbert, called it one of the best films he’d ever seen.) Since it came out on general release in America last November, it has won two Golden Globes and been nominated for three Baftas and five Oscars, including one for best director. Gerwig is only the fifth woman nominated in the category in the 90-year history of the awards.

Set over a year, between the autumns of 2002 and 2003, in Sacramento, California (where Gerwig herself grew up), it follows the teenager Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson (Saoirse Ronan), who is a young woman at odds with her mother (a nurse, like Gerwig’s mother, and played by Laurie Metcalf), her strict Catholic school and her home on the wrong side of the tracks. She yearns for a different life, to go to college on the east coast, “where writers live in the woods”, some place she can reinvent herself.

Lady Bird isn’t the first film Gerwig has written — she has created several screenplays with her longtime boyfriend, the indie-film dreamboat Noah Baumbauch (The Life Aquatic, Frances Ha, Mistress America). The pair met on the set of the romcom Greenberg in 2010, and together form the linchpin of an achingly cool set of young mumblecore American writers, directors and actors that includes Wes Anderson, Jesse Eisenberg, Adam Driver and Lena Dunham.

Now, in Lady Bird, Gerwig has corralled the perfect indie Venn diagram in Timothée Chalamet (Call Me by Your Name), Lucas Hedges (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri) and Ronan, who has been billed by Ryan Gosling as “a genius” and “Meryl Streep reborn”. For Ronan herself, with a Golden Globe already under her belt and the Bafta and Oscar best actress nominations, Lady Bird certainly seems to be a coming-of-age movie. “Saoirse has what the greats have, what Meryl has, what Julianne Moore has,” Gerwig says. “It’s what you always hope for in an actor.”

SR I’ve been longing to ask you, what was the first scene you wrote for Lady Bird?

GG I wrote the first scene in 2013, and it featured a girl at college. When someone asks her where she’s from, she says Sacramento, and when he mishears, she says San Francisco. I was drawn to the topic of how, at some point in your life, you inevitably disown where you’re from. It’s part of growing up.

By early 2015, I went out and tried to raise money for the movie. Most people who have money to invest are guys. If they’d been raised with sisters or had a daughter, they totally got this movie. But if they hadn’t, they’d say: “Can women really fight like this?!” And I would say: “Whoa there, yes! Welcome to the greatest show on earth.” While it’s not literally autobiographical, there are definitely things drawn from my experience. Actually my mother said the funniest thing to me. I showed my parents and brother the movie…

SR What did they say?

GG They loved it. They called me crying on speakerphone and they were just so moved by it. But my mother said the funniest thing — she said: “You wished I’d given you the silent treatment growing up.” [Laughs.]

SR I watched the film for the first time with my best friend in October. We had a couple of glasses of white wine before we went in because I was so nervous, but we had our arms wrapped around each other. Even though I knew what was going to happen in the film, I was laughing one moment and sobbing hysterically the next. It’s about the beautiful struggle of being a teenager, growing and changing and getting to know yourself, and having the realisation that relationships change. I identify with a lot in Lady Bird. The great thing about how you’ve written the character is that she doesn’t know how great or special she is. And there’s a huge sense of the importance of belonging, belonging to a place, a time in your life.

GG And also belonging to yourself.

SR Exactly.

GG We’d never met before this film, had we? I had no idea what you were going to be like.

SR I could have been a nightmare.

GG You really could have been.

SR Maybe I was and you’re just not telling people!

GG You had this lovely bond with all of the crew.

SR The crew are the people I want to hang out with when I’m working, and that’s why, usually, I actually don’t get anything out of watching the final cut of a film. Most of the time, as cheesy as it sounds, I’m not doing a movie for that, I’m doing it because I get to work with these brilliant people. I think there’s definitely an Irish thing in my head that tells me not to take up all the oxygen in the room, too.

GG It was a dream for me to be on the other side of the camera. I’ve always wanted to direct, and sitting at the back of the theatre watching other people act my lines was the most addictive thing ever. I’ve never done heroin, but I’m sure that is what it feels like. I am crazy about all my actors. When I see them I get all teared up. I was actually told I need to stop saying that I cry when I see them. [Laughs.] But it’s true, I really love them!

SR Maybe they just said don’t cry so much. [Laughs.]

GG Don’t cry so much. I know. [Laughs.] Also, your mom is a magic lady.

SR She is, she really is. She is a perfect human being.

GG When I first met her, she made me tea and had cookies, it was so cute!

SR She went to Whole Foods. It was before the guys got there, and we were dyeing my hair for the film and Mam was like, “I’m after getting them some biscuits and some cupcakes.” I said, “Mam, don’t!” When she came back with armfuls of stuff, I was like, “Mam, why did you get them so much? They probably want a salad or something.” But no.

GG I wanted the biscuits. I wanted all the biscuits!

SR Have you told anyone about the Cheetos?

GG No, I haven’t told anyone about the Cheetos. I ate a tremendous amount of Cheetos.

SR She likes the original cheese flavour, but a crunchy variety. She inhales them in 60 seconds flat. By the end of the shoot, there were more and more.

GG I was fuelled by them. There was a code on set, with everyone who had a walkie-talkie. They’d say, “We need a Greta on set.” I asked, “What’s a Greta?” and they said, “Cheetos and a Diet Coke.” [Laughs.] I thought, that’s so sad, all I’m eating is chemicals.

SR There was so much love on the set.

GG So much love! Every picture I have of the two of us, we are embracing and hugging each other. [Laughs.] I’ve had incredible luck with the people I’ve worked with, but it’s hard to imagine something or dream something if you don’t have an example. I look forward to a time when half of all movies are directed by ladies, because they should be. And I hope things are changing for women in Hollywood. The first time I understood cinema as an art form was Beau Travail by Claire Denis. I’d never seen anything like it, and at the end, when her name came up, I thought: “Well, either that’s a strange man’s name or a woman directed this.” And a little seed was planted in me.

SR I think we’re entering a better time.

GG I think we are. I’m friends with Lena Dunham and I admire her — she’s younger than me and I look up to her. I want more women to write and direct, and be producers and executives, and be presidents of companies. It’s no mistake that I started firing up on this movie right after I worked with both Rebecca Miller and Mia Hansen-Love. I thought: “All right, this is a must. I want Saoirse to direct, too, and I want a girl who is 15 right now to see this film and say, ‘I can do it.’ ” It’s essential we pull each other up and push each other forward.
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LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 18: Saoirse Ronan attends the EE British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA) held at Royal Albert Hall on February 18, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

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