Teddy Quinlivan - Page 24 - the Fashion Spot
 
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06-03-2018
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Loved the new hair, looks great. She had a good season, tho. Hopefully that translate to print work

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I'm digging the new look.

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Love the hair! Canít wait to see new work with it.

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07-03-2018
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What a great season, I'm so happy for her. I hope the new look will take her even further. (Even if I probably preferred the previous one)

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Not into the new hair, at all.

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Love the new hair!!!!!

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She's very glamorous in her style/aesthetic so I'm curious/excited to see how the new look will translate. The red was very fitting for her.

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elle

Nobody Knew Model Teddy Quinlivan Was Transgender—Here's Why She Came Out
AS TOLD TO NAOMI ROUGEAU - MAR 7, 2018

Last September during New York Fashion Week, I came out publicly as transgender: first in an online interview with CNN Style, then on Instagram, since that’s what you do now when you have a life-changing announcement. If it came as a surprise to people, it’s because I’d already been working as a female model for the past few years.

I actually started taking hormones when I was 17. I grew up in Boston and knew early on that I was very much female, despite my anatomy. I would sneak into my mom’s closet and play dress-up. Unbeknownst to my parents, I would change into girls’ clothing and put on makeup once I got to school. I understood at a young age that fashion is about identity and self-expression, and that we convey gender through clothing. People would say, “Take that dress off; you are a boy!” But I’ve always been rebellious. I thought, Fine, you don’t want me to wear a skirt? I’m gonna wear one every day. I was viciously bullied for it. When I would defend myself, I’d be the one in trouble. Every time in the principal’s office, it was the same spiel: “If you don’t want people to bully you anymore, then conform.”

At home, things were a bit better. Although my parents were both very conservative, they nurtured my creative side. For a long time, they thought I might be gay, but it wasn’t that. One night, I told my mom that I wanted to live as a female. She was like, “Okay, if you’re going to transition, you have to really do it—take the hormones on schedule, and be responsible about it.” She was very vigilant about finding the right doctors. She didn’t want me to have a challenging life and was concerned for my safety. My dad didn’t get it at first. But he made the effort, especially after I started presenting as female and he saw that I could live in the world safely and comfortably.

They let me switch schools, to Walnut Hill School for the Arts, a boarding school in Massachusetts. Still, when we visited, my mom was like, “Please just present as a boy; look normal.” I did because I wanted her to be comfortable—and I also really wanted to go to Walnut Hill. Everybody there had been ostracized for one reason or another. As soon as I started classes there, I felt a really strong sense of community. I could wear high heels every day, and for the first time, I got to decide my pronoun. I had this incredible art teacher who asked me, “Do you want me to call you she or he?” That was revolutionary. I chose “she,” and from then on, it stuck.

My dad had always discouraged me from coming out as transgender publicly, since there are a lot of people who want to hurt trans people simply for existing. When I started modeling after high school, I chose to conceal my truth. Because I was so passable as female, I was closed off to the idea of telling anyone. I had a very normal life.

I CAN’T STAY SILENT WHILE A REALITY TV PRESIDENT ACTIVELY FIGHTS TO PREVENT PEOPLE LIKE ME FROM LIVING A NORMAL LIFE.


But transitioning isn’t just a matter of growing out your hair, wearing heels, and piercing your ears. Taking hormones affects your mood; it’s like being born again. It changes not only the way you look but the way you see the world. While my career was taking off—I was signed when I was 22—I was going through a lot emotionally. All of a sudden, I was acting like a prepubescent girl. And since I was concealing my identity, no one understood. So about a year ago, I decided to come out to my bookers, Michael and Pedja. They had no clue. Telling them opened their eyes and helped them better understand my situation. I realized I was ready to tell the world.

There’s a stereotype of transgender people based on what’s shown on Maury Povich or Jerry Springer. It’s that there’s something mentally wrong with them, that they are incapable of serving in the military or existing in the workplace normally. But that’s not true at all. I am proof—a successful model who happens to be transgender. And I think fashion, in terms of social power, is the most important industry. Advertising has tremendous impact in terms of who and what we find attractive. It’s a hard sphere to penetrate. But I have.

So I can’t stay silent while a reality TV president actively fights to prevent people like me from living a normal life. There is no evidence to support the notion that transgender people are being perverted in the restrooms of their choosing. If legislation is being made on my behalf as an American citizen, then it’s incumbent on me to speak up for the transgender taxpayers who deserve the same dignity and respect that a cisgender person receives. And if I’ve learned anything from Trump’s election, it’s that literally anything is possible in the twenty-first century. Why can’t a transgender person walk in a Versace show or run for office? She already has—and maybe, one day, I will.

This article originally appeared in the March 2018 issue of ELLE.

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i-d.vice

teddy quinlivan speaks out for transgender rights
By i-D Staff photos by Inez and Vinoodh
FEB 19 2018, 5:25PM


"I knew I was a girl, and I knew that from a very young age, and through fashion I was able to transform into the woman I always felt I was inside.”

This article originally appeared in The Radical Issue, no. 350, Spring 2018.

What does it mean to be a model? i-D has always believed in the power of speaking out. Today, the voices of models are more vital than ever. Here, Cameron Russell, Adwoa Aboah, Dara Allen, Christy Turlington, Anja Rubik, Hanne Gaby Odiele, Teddy Quinlivan, Paloma Elsesser, Liya Kebede and Doutzen Kroes champion their passions, causes, fights and beliefs.


“When I was growing up, it’s not necessarily that I felt uncomfortable in my own skin, because I liked the way I looked and I had this amazing upbringing, a family that was great. It wasn’t until I started getting older that I began to realise that there were boundaries around gender. I wanted to wear princess dresses, and I wanted to play with barbies, and I wanted to play with girls. I was attracted to femininity. Growing up and being told my whole life that I had to be masculine to fit into this body that was completely based off of one organ that I never chose, was really challenging. I started to suppress it, but I would come home every day after school and go into my mum’s closet and put on her high heels. When she came home I would put everything back in its place and pretend like nothing was happening.

I knew I was a girl, and I knew that from a very young age, and through fashion I was able to transform into the woman I always felt I was inside. I transitioned when I was 16 years old. I couldn’t hide it anymore. It was killing me and I wanted to live. Then after I’d walked enough shows, and shot enough editorials and done some advertising, and had kind of created a name for myself -- a little bit at least -- I felt like I was able to come out and have an impact.

A big piece of what I wanted to say was, “You can be transgender... the person sitting next to you could be transgender. Your doctor could be transgender. That model on the cover of that magazine could be transgender. That girl walking that show could be transgender, and you had no idea, and it shouldn’t matter.

I think feminism has always been a dirty word to the general public. There's this negativity associated with women asking for equality. And that negativity has been associated with feminism because women have been told their whole lives that we don't deserve to be equal. Inequality in any way, shape, or form should be unacceptable because we're all human.

So for me, feminism has been an extremely powerful tool. I like the fact that people don't like it. I'm very proud of the fact that it's a dirty word. I'm proud of the fact that it makes people uncomfortable because it should be making people uncomfortable. Change is not comfortable. Change is not easy. Change is something that is hard and we have to fight for it. And we have to prove to people that our change is worthy and deserving. And that's a very difficult thing to do. And it's not about women asking politely to be equal anymore. It's not about transgender people asking to be equal anymore. We're done asking politely for these things. We are starting to demand respect now.”



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31-03-2018
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Now listed in models.com's Top 50 list, congrats Teddy! She also recently scored a Vogue US editorial.
I hope she gets some campaigns this season (c'mon Nicolas).

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01-04-2018
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Yes Iíve been waiting for her to get a LV campaign for so long. Nicolas seems to like her, so donít know where the problem is.

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02-05-2018
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March 2018 Digitals

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03-05-2018
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I don't know if Teddy's discovered push up bras or what, though she's looking different on Instagram/her story lately

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