How to wear clothes articles - The Guardian - Page 3 - the Fashion Spot
 
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23-08-2005
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Thanks for the latest editions Helena

I relate to her. Completely agree with the mini-dress/trouser assessment!

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23-08-2005
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i'm rustling, too!

thanks for posting these helena, hadn't seen them till now

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23-08-2005
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Wow, I can't believe I just found this thread. Love the witty and insightful articles!

Thanks for posting helena

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24-08-2005
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thanks girls - she always makes for a bit of lighthearted reading on a saturday morning!

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01-09-2005
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How to wear clothes

Jess Cartner-Morley
Saturday August 27, 2005
The Guardian




Sorry, boys: cleavage is over. For a few honeyed years, fashion magazine pictures shared a top-half aesthetic with more conventionally risqué publications: bosoms cantilevered by Wonderbra or scalpel jostled for space as high and central on the breastbone as possible, like two tubby acrobats on a tightrope. The whole spectacle was framed by Gucci satin blouses oozing out of their buttons, or high-street cashmeres with very deep V-necks.

Much as it flouts the natural order that a look with so much sex appeal could ever go out of fashion, that's exactly what has happened. This is not to say that cleavages will have disappeared come party season, but the look will no longer come under the auspices of fashion.

It is not that fashion is covering up; just that the lines have changed. The new eveningwear is strapless, with a neckline straight across the bust or gently knotted in the middle: a classic shape with a couture elegance. While there is, if anything, more flesh exposed than by a plunging V-neck, the emphasis has shifted up, to the shoulders and neck, so the impression is more demure. It's a look that gained momentum on the red carpet, rather than the catwalk: at the Oscars and Golden Globes, long, strapless dresses were much favoured for their classic elegance. The look is diva rather than wannabe.

In the real world, the strapless, floor-length dress is not a style anyone without the love life of Zsa Zsa Gabor would get much wear out of, but the shape works equally well with a kneelength hem, either in a pencil skirt or full. Strapless with a miniskirt, however, is a bit vintage Duran Duran video - and not in a good way. But it will do if you're intent on recapturing the attentions that wandered when you zipped up the cleavage.

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01-09-2005
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Thank you for these articles,Helena! i continue to enjoy them.

I rejoice at the death of cleavage (I am too big-busted ever to show mine anyway LOL).

I,too,recently acquired a pair of (knee length) Paul Smith shorts.


However,though I now "rustle",I am old enough to remember the puffball skirts of my childhood and,more importantly,the mortification involved for anyone who later had to admit that they had ever worn them.

I fortunately didn't get one then,and I most certainly won't be getting one now!!

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04-09-2005
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How to wear clothes

Jess Cartner-Morley
Saturday September 3, 2005
The Guardian




There is a very simple formula behind every successful fashion trend. Essentially you take two names or phrases that each conjure up strong, but wildly different, mental images. Then you put them together in one concept, the more preposterous the better. "The Mitford girls go to Ibiza", say, or "The Great Gatsby meets The OC". Almost any piece of fashion writing - and mea most definitely culpa on this one - will contain at least one such piece of sartorial nonsense. The elements don't have to have an affinity; in fact, the mental jarring you get when you try to blend two images that fight is part of the impact. It doesn't have to be a good combination; it just has to sound good. Catchy, like a Crazy Frog ringtone, rather than melodious.

Sometimes these crazy cocktails turn out to be delicious. John Galliano is the Heston Blumenthal of conjuring beautiful dishes from unlikely fashion ingredients: his last couture show, based on connections he saw between Dior's classic 1947 New Look collection and traditional Peruvian dress, was a triumph. The formula for creating a trend out of unlikely pairings has its roots in sound style principles. Most classically chic looks have at their core the chemistry of opposites. The Hitchcock blonde in belted pencil skirt is compelling because the look is poised between strict tailoring and the feminine charm of curves and curled hair. Female style icons who have pulled off men's clothing, from Diane Keaton in Annie Hall to Bianca marrying Mick in a white suit, have exploited dramatic tension between masculine and feminine. Sex symbols from Marilyn Monroe to Britney Spears have played off doe-eyed innocence against a siren's pout. You need a bit of contrast to make clothes into fashion, rather than costume. So stop s******ing at the back.

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04-09-2005
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Fun! Thanks for posting.

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10-09-2005
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How to wear clothes

Jess Cartner-Morley
Saturday September 10, 2005
The Guardian




I've found a brilliant diet. I can vouch for how fabulously motivational it is: unlike the 27-bites-a-day diet and the post-GI-superfood-detox, I stuck to it for an entire morning, which is a personal best. No elevenses! I don't know if I lost any weight, because I didn't manage to weigh myself in the three-hour period following the regime, and by the time I got home that night I'd had lunch, afternoon tea and a couple of snacks, so I didn't feel the scales would give me a fair representation of my momentous feat.

I bet you're wondering how I did it, aren't you? The good news is, the diet is very simple and doesn't involve scouring fusty-smelling healthfood stores for linseed oil or filling the fridge with blueberries. The magic ingredient is available on a high street near you; even better, you don't have to actually buy it to reap the benefits. I'm talking about skinny jeans, my friends. Having been taken in by the oldest trick in the fashion brainwashing book - paparazzi pictures of Kate Moss endlessly reprinted in the tabloids - I foolishly allowed myself to toy with the notion that perhaps drainpipe jeans were not the devil's work that any sane person knows them to be. Reader, I tried a pair on.

Suffice to say, I won't be doing it again in a hurry. Some things in life are just not fair. Elle Macpherson can wear flip-flops with a minidress to a party thrown by Victoria Beckham and look both thin enough and glamorous enough. Similarly, some people can wear skinny jeans. I could, possibly, if I could just find a way to stretch my legs a few inches: I have that really dumb habit of standing on invisible high heels when I try on clothes, and so long as I do that, the jeans look OK. But when I have to stand (flat) on my own two feet, I come down to earth with a bump. You have been warned.

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10-09-2005
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she's funny today!!!!!

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10-09-2005
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haha I like it! thanks for posting helena

Beware of the skinny jeans.

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10-09-2005
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^Its very true, what she said about height. I'm just over 5ft, tried some on today and my mum asked "Are they supposed to look like that?".

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10-09-2005
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I'm afraid I "get" her on the skinny jeans too...and I do that "invisible high heel" thing too .

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28-09-2005
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How to wear clothes

Jess Cartner-Morley
Saturday September 24, 2005
The Guardian

As you are no doubt fully aware, this season's new look is equal parts classic Parisian couture and Hitchcock ice queen, with a hint of Napoleon around the jacket epaulettes and an echo of Miss Havisham in the blouse department. Boho is over (unless it's Russian boho, but more of that another day). Puffball skirts are in (although so are pencil skirts). Black is back, but purple is the new teal.

Got all that? If not, this is your lucky day, for I have stumbled upon a fashion short cut. It may not get you on the best-dressed list, but it will help, in a Cliff Notes kind of way, as you scrape through this perilous transseasonal period. Here it is:



I had lunch with a gorgeous, always-ahead-of-the-pack friend who was wearing a wide leather belt over her sundress - worn tight at the waist, not in Sienna-esque cowgirl fashion - and thus looking fabulously autumn/winter. So I went to Accessorize and bought a wide leather belt for £20.

Having a waist was not only flattering, but had a result as instant and effective as sharpening a pencil: a simple T-shirt and skirt, which would otherwise give too woolly an outline, were magically transformed into An Outfit. Usefully, the effect is smart, without being dressy; it enables you to look dressed for work, rather than dressed-up for work. (Though it seems to work only with skirts or dresses that end at the knee. With a short skirt, the big belt looks brash and 80s; with a long skirt, it looks like Helena Bonham Carter circa 1991.) I'm not pretending that a £20 belt is the answer to all your prayers. But it has seen me through that tricky, nothing-to-wear early season gap when I usually panic-buy half of Topshop in a lunch hour. And that is at least one of my prayers answered.





ork only with skirts or dresses that end at the knee. With a short skirt, the big belt looks brash and 80s; with a long skirt, it looks like Helena Bonham Carter circa 1991.) I'm not pretending that a £20 belt is the answer to all your prayers. But it has seen me through that tricky, nothing-to-wear early season gap when I usually panic-buy half of Topshop in a lunch hour. And that is at least one of my prayers answered.

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28-09-2005
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How to wear clothes

Jess Cartner-Morley
Saturday September 10, 2005
The Guardian




I've found a brilliant diet. I can vouch for how fabulously motivational it is: unlike the 27-bites-a-day diet and the post-GI-superfood-detox, I stuck to it for an entire morning, which is a personal best. No elevenses! I don't know if I lost any weight, because I didn't manage to weigh myself in the three-hour period following the regime, and by the time I got home that night I'd had lunch, afternoon tea and a couple of snacks, so I didn't feel the scales would give me a fair representation of my momentous feat.

I bet you're wondering how I did it, aren't you? The good news is, the diet is very simple and doesn't involve scouring fusty-smelling healthfood stores for linseed oil or filling the fridge with blueberries. The magic ingredient is available on a high street near you; even better, you don't have to actually buy it to reap the benefits. I'm talking about skinny jeans, my friends. Having been taken in by the oldest trick in the fashion brainwashing book - paparazzi pictures of Kate Moss endlessly reprinted in the tabloids - I foolishly allowed myself to toy with the notion that perhaps drainpipe jeans were not the devil's work that any sane person knows them to be. Reader, I tried a pair on.
Suffice to say, I won't be doing it again in a hurry. Some things in life are just not fair. Elle Macpherson can wear flip-flops with a minidress to a party thrown by Victoria Beckham and look both thin enough and glamorous enough. Similarly, some people can wear skinny jeans. I could, possibly, if I could just find a way to stretch my legs a few inches: I have that really dumb habit of standing on invisible high heels when I try on clothes, and so long as I do that, the jeans look OK. But when I have to stand (flat) on my own two feet, I come down to earth with a bump. You have been warned.

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