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22-10-2005
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NYTimes editorial and articles on weddings
source: nytimes.com

Quote:
Altar Egos
Photographs by LIZ COLLINS
Walk down the aisle in a new gown and a borrowed identity. Something old or blue is optional.


Liz Collins
THE GRACE KELLY
Vera Wang A-line gown with embroidered Alençon, Lyon and Chantilly lace. Kelima K lace bolero with bell sleeves, $775. At Kelima K, 229B Mott Street. Ulla-Maija veil. Moulie bouquet.
Fashion editor: Anne Christensen



Liz Collins
THE MELANIA TRUMP
Reem Acra silk satin hourglass gown with sculptured neckline, beaded and embroidered appliqués and sweeping back train, $7,150. At Reem Acra, 14 East 60th Street. Carolina Amato leather gloves. Manolo Blahnik shoes.



Liz Collins
THE JONI MITCHELL
Carolina Herrera dotted-chiffon-draped gown with embroidered-ribbon neckline, $3,490. At Carolina Herrera, 954 Madison Avenue. Moulie floral wreath.



Liz Collins
THE WALLIS SIMPSON
Ulla-Maija double-faced charmeuse column gown with embroidered collar, $3,600. See www.ulla-maija.com.



Liz Collins
THE JODIE FOSTER
Maison Martin Margiela Line 0 wedding dress, $11,100, and Maison Martin Margiela Line 4 wool pants, $545. At Barneys New York. Capezio ballet slippers.



Liz Collins
THE ALICE ROOSEVELT LONGWORTH
Comme des Garçons silk satin dress with ink-jet print, $2,040. At Linda Dresner, 484 Park Avenue. Kelima K headpiece and veil.



Liz Collins
THE JERRY HALL
Elizabeth Fillmore satin-ribbon-on-organza empire gown over a satin A-line sheath, $7,920. At Bergdorf Goodman. Magda Berliner leather maille cape, $1,060. At Barneys New York. Patricia Underwood satin top hat. La Crasia crocheted fingerless gloves. Converse sneakers.
All jewelry from Chopard. Fashion assistant: Melissa Ventosa. Hair by Peter Gray for Aveda. Makeup by Miranda Joyce at Streeters. Manicure by Anatole. Model: Michelle Alves.

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22-10-2005
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source: nytimes.com



Quote:
The Unveiling

By KATE ZERNIKE
Published: October 23, 2005


"Do I need botox?"
"Absolutely not," he says, so swiftly that if I hadn't already agreed to marry him, I should right now.
I'm not reassured. I have just returned from my first visit to Francesca Fusco, a Manhattan dermatologist who offers personalized packages promising perfect wedding skin. The appointment has been full of possibility, convincing me that with enough work, I can look the age of the average American bride, a decade younger than I am. "Your face is fine when it's at rest," Fusco said, peering at my crow's-feet. "But when you smile.. . ." Her voice trailed off. "And all those pictures.. . ." All those pictures.

Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times
On Kelly Brady, our bride: Sonia Rykiel sweater. Tara O'Callaghan headband. Merrijam by Selima necklace. Earrings by Lizzie Scheck Jewelry. On Dr. Francesca Fusco (playing herself): Necklace at No. 6.

Wedding skin hadn't been on my checklist beyond the thought that I might have a facial before the big day. But becoming a bride does weird things to you. Magazines, married friends, the snooty ladies staring up at you on the dressing-room platform all remind you that this is the day when you have to look your absolute best, when you will be photographed more than ever before or after.
You must master flawless, rested skin even as you juggle meetings with the dressmaker, the florist, the caterer, the stationer, the musicians and the officiant who announces after you take a day off to meet with him that he's going to Scotland to golf the weekend of your wedding. Oh, and hold down a full-time job. Silly me, thinking "radiant" and "bride" go together like a horse and carriage.
Fusco told me that brides begin seeing her 6 or 12 months before their weddings, even two years if they want to laser off facial hair. I had four months to erase the squint lines around my eyes and the brown spots - a result of blemishes and too much sun.
Fusco, cheerful and elegantly dressed, with long black curls and creamy skin that looks well shy of its 46 years, decided that we would start with the YAG laser on the brown spots. "YAG - destructive," she wrote on my chart, telling me this is a good thing. She suggested "baby Botox" for my eyes and once-a-month trichloracidic acid peels. "The idea is just to look better and brighter," she said. She can give brides a strong peel the day before the wedding, but there is a trade-off. "On the honeymoon, you could look a little," she paused, "flaky."
She handed me a Botox cow - a squishy rubber toy the pharmaceutical company makes for patients to squeeze during treatments - as she tested the YAG on a brown spot on my chest. I smelled smoke. "Yeah, it's burning," she said. She sent me off with an $80 eye cream for dark circles, $100 vitamin C and E cream to apply at night and a prescription lightening cream, EpiQuin Micro, to apply every morning.
It took me 10 minutes more to get ready every day, but the early results were good. The first peel gave me rosier, softer skin, and I glowed even more from the compliments. I started to obsess. With skin, as with weddings, there is always something more you can do. Fusco showed me refrigerators packed with the fat that women have taken from their thighs or hips to inject into their faces. The patient in the room next to me during one visit had been at a benefit where a $22,000 face lift was raffled off.
The ring bearer, age 5, looked closely at my face a few weeks later and asked, "What's that?" A mole, I told him. "It's kind of ugly," he said. His mother interjected, "It's a beauty mark." Too late. I asked my fiancé, a physician, what he thought, and he made a fatal mistake. "You'll probably have to have it removed sooner or later," he said.
"Is it ugly?"
"It's fine." Fine? The best man cut in: "If you're going to have it removed, do it before the wedding. You're going to have the pictures for the rest of your life." I turned on Jonathan, my fiancé: "The rest of my life!"
Fusco nixed the mole removal; the scar wouldn't fade in time. She became more aggressive with the laser and doubled the strength of the peel. My skin flaked bits of debris. "You're like the space shuttle," Jonathan marveled.
Still, at an engagement party, two women cut me off in midsentence to say how fantastic my skin looked. I brought up Botox at a bridal shower, and the guests were against it. "But these!" I said crinkling my eyes. "It's character," my mother scolded. The only person who thought I should get it was a friend who was also a bride. "The character comes back in three months," she insisted.
On my last visit, Fusco gave me a microdermabrasion peel to avoid the Space Shuttle look. "No alcohol the night before the wedding - you'll be puffy," she told me.
"But the rehearsal dinner - the toasts."
"No salt, then."
"It's a clambake."
"Drink coffee - it's a diuretic," she said cheerfully.
"That will stain my teeth," I said just to see if she had an answer. "There are those little Go Smile packets," she said. "Brush one on - you'll be fine." She gave me her cellphone number. "If you have any skin issues, you know who to call!"
I promised that next time I came, I would bring photos.

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22-10-2005
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DosViolines, thank you for the pictures. They are beautiful and inspiring!

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source: nytimes.com

Quote:
The Taste Test

By DANA BOWEN
Published: October 23, 2005


MELISSA LYNCH could have panicked. Her wedding was less than two weeks away, the menu was undecided and she hadn't the foggiest clue what her cake would look like. Instead, Lynch, the promotions director for Food & Wine magazine, heartily devoured an egg-white omelet at a greasy spoon across from her Midtown office and joked about the unforgiving lines of her Romona Keveza dress.



Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times Location: Restaurant Daniel. On table, clockwise from rear right: Scalloped cake stand, $29. At www.williams-sonoma.com. JL Coquet Limoges bowl, $65, and dinner plate, $85; Jaune de Chrome porcelain tortoise coupe bowl, $95; and dinner plate (under square plate), $95. All at Takashimaya New York, 693 Fifth Avenue. Square dinner plate, $12. At www.potterybarn.com. Clio Sculptural rice bowl (holding oysters), $60. At www.clio-home.com. Kate Spade Rutherford Circle green-banded dessert plate. At www.katespade.com. Pottery Barn asparagus platter, $12. Jaune de Chrome bowl. On table, center: Square cake stand, $45. At www.williams-sonoma.com. Gold-leaf porcelain salad plate (on goblet), $135. At Takashimaya. Kate Spade Larabee Road Tidbit polka-dot plates. Food: Feast & Fêtes Catering by Daniel.


It's not as if Lynch, 38, didn't obsess over every morsel of her wedding. "I have complete faith in the people I've hired," she said. As she lifted her fork, her sapphire-cuddled diamond lighted up the diner. But when the conversation delved into details, her voice registered a chord of worry.
"People know where I work, so they're expecting more than a normal wedding," she said. How could you possibly wow a crowd that mixed her friend the Cordon Bleu alum; her mom, the picky eater; and her fiancé's family from Jacksonville, Ill., which he called a "a meat-and-potatoes kind of place"?
When people whose lives revolve around food tie the knot, the feast plays an exalted (if complicated and hyperanalyzed) role. Everyone knew that Lynch went to culinary school and that she had worked at the Food Network. And most knew that she was one of the creative forces behind the Best New Chefs gala and the magazine's annual Classic in Aspen. Was she expected to outdo these fetes with her own wedding?
What's more, food was the leitmotif of her courtship with Jay Meyer. Meyer, 36, a sales director at Food & Wine, first asked Lynch out after a meeting, when she consumed an embarrassment of churros. On their first date, they spent six margarita-drenched hours at the bar at Rosa Mexicano, bonding over guacamole. As they grew more familiar, she introduced him to the rabbit at Babbo; he introduced her to the hot dogs at Wrigley Field.
Their culinary histories unfolded gradually. His family was allergic to fancy. Her mom, who lives in Rye, N.Y., used to give fabulous parties with Wonder Bread cheese puffs and other guilty 60's pleasures. When it was time to meet his parents, she sweated over where to eat. They chose 'Cesca, a comfortable Italian restaurant with a wood-burning oven. They all ate with gusto, and Meyer proposed soon after.
"We knew we didn't want anything cookie-cutter," said Lynch, who had been married before. They decided on a formal dinner for 55 close friends and family at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, a favorite restaurant of theirs on a former Rockefeller estate north of Manhattan. Vows would be exchanged in a nearby chapel with gorgeous stained-glass windows.
Lynch had plenty of ideas. Two long tables instead of the usual round ones for eight. Passed petits fours to encourage mingling. They would toast with the Châteauneuf-du-Pape they skimped on the church flowers to afford.
At Blue Hill's request, the tasting was two weeks before the wedding. The foodie in Lynch understood that this allowed them to sample seasonal ingredients; the bride fretted. Eventually they chose three courses with wine pairings: a poached egg from a pasture-raised chicken set atop 11 herbs, lobster with corn, then roasted Berkshire pork - with a shot of garden-green gazpacho to start.
"I wanted to do something that people couldn't get at home," she said. And that's where she relinquished control. Meyer planned the rehearsal dinner at 'Cesca. The only direction Lynch gave the cake designer, Margaret Braun (known for whimsies like "Homage to Linoleum"), was the color scheme and a preference for almonds and figs. "You have to let the art people run with it," she said.
Two days before the wedding, Dan Barber, the chef, found Concord grapes at the market, but no more corn. He called the bride with a last-minute brainstorm involving a pondicherry sauce for the lobster. He said it was consistently true, if counterintuitive, that nonfoodies are the ones who micromanage and displace anxieties onto wedding food. "People who have a background in food are much more hands-off," he said. As a result of that trust, "you want very much to please them."
It rained during the reception, but the bride couldn't have cared less. "It gave the meal a cozy, farmhousy feel," she said, beaming at the farewell brunch, surrounded by family and friends giddily reliving details. "Those little tomato burgers!" someone said. "That last wine!" People were still talking about the cake. And who knew that the bride, in a previous life, bartended at T.G.I. Friday's? Thanks to her sister's toast, everyone.
Ms. Lynch, now Mrs. Meyer, said she became teary when she poked her head into the kitchen and spotted the chefs in a prefeast frenzy. Barber admitted to a twinge of discomfort when the couple publicly thanked the chefs after dinner. "Because it's not about the food," he said.
But for this couple, a large part of it was.

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Glad you like it Caffeine

source: nytimes.com



Quote:
Location Doubt

By GINIA BELLAFANTE
Published: October 23, 2005


LAST SPRING, without much investigation or dispute, my husband and I decided that we would be married at the United Nations. This choice of location, I would learn much later, aroused curiosity among those who didn't know me well. Rumors started circulating that I was marrying a diplomat or someone otherwise glamorously connected to the international community. This was not my destiny. My husband is an English professor whose window of available dates was inflexibly arranged around the University of Alabama's football schedule, possible postseason bowl games, his fantasy-baseball commitments and the grand slam tournaments of the P.G.A. Location research was largely my territory. Rummaging through a recycling bin at work, I unearthed a copy of a magazine for event planners and discovered that any regular civilian could be married at the U.N. - even someone who didn't know if Burkina Faso was the name of a country or the name of a person who may or may not have won the Booker Prize.




Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times
The bridal party walks through a checkpoint at the Brooklyn Museum, where, unlike at the United Nations, Champagne can be served in line. For information on wedding receptions call (718) 501-6423. Flowers: LMD Floral Events Interiors, lmdfloral.com. Champagne tray at fortunoff.com. Sugahara Champagne glass, $40. At Takashimaya New York.

The ceremony would take place at the U.N. chapel across the street from the main complex, followed by a reception in the Delegates Dining Room, a setting that is a lot less austere than its name suggests. The dining room's floor-to-ceiling windows face out toward a big terrace perched over the East River. The interior looks as if it were last decorated in the 70's and Kurt Waldheim let Margaret Trudeau pick out the carpeting. This aesthetic was quirkily promising, even if the potential menu was not. I knew Aramark, the exclusive caterer to the U.N., as a purveyor of food to prisons and convention centers.
I pessimistically made a lunch reservation at the Delegates Dining Room for a Friday afternoon, to see what sort of meal might be our fate. My husband was out of town, so I brought along a friend. He was very excited about the prospect of a wedding in an architecturally significant building to which one travels by cab, but was tempering that enthusiasm with his general distrust of the U.N. as an institution - oil-for-food, not a plus - and, specifically, with his feeling that the U.N. maintains an active bias against the state of Israel. There in the buffet line we encountered lots of men from many different places wearing suits not from Brooks Brothers. And Lauren Bush. We sat down to a less-than-international lunch of salad and meats and roasted vegetables, and figured that if the fare was good enough for heads of state, it would pass muster with our assorted friends and family. Israel, Smizreal, I imagined my friend thinking. This veal was pretty tasty.
I called my husband with the culinary news, and then the paperwork began. "United Nations Catering may cancel a function only if required to do so by circumstances beyond its control," the contract informed me. I was thus free to imagine what circumstances might constitute a breach of international law so significant as to disrupt my nuptials. Would 154 guests be denied toast points if, say, Norway invaded Australia? Where did these General Assembly people draw the line anyway? I have a colleague whose planner got so drunk at her wedding that she forgot to bring the cake, but if something unfortunate were to transpire in any country with the suffix "stan" - well, that would make me very wedding-story competitive indeed. I began to see the hidden advantages in this contract clause. If the U.N. was forced to cancel my wedding, wouldn't it have to render some form of compensation? Someone would offer me my own ambassadorship, I determined. Then I could minister to the six or seven children left in the world, outside of the United States and Belgium, who weren't already regularly tended to by Angelina Jolie.
As our talks with the dining room's coordinator progressed, we also learned that our guests would be asked to show photo ID and pass through a metal detector before joining the reception. I was tickled. It was surely fair to assume that none of our friends had been to a wedding with a security line. In an inspired moment, my husband suggested that we might even serve drinks: our wedding would be like the Delta Shuttle but with Mojitos, he said. But as it turns out, the only beverage permitted in the security line is water in a plastic cup, so our wedding was ultimately more like the Delta Shuttle when it ran out of Coke. I then made another inquiry. Given that the U.N. isn't officially in the United States, it couldn't officially be in New York City - so would our guests be permitted to smoke? No, they would not.
World events were on our side that Saturday in July. The evening went off very well, and our family and friends all seemed to enjoy themselves. No one made ha-ha Boutrous Boutrous-Ghali jokes. No one got so drunk that they stormed into the General Assembly and drew funny-face pictures of their least-favorite potentates.
But I certainly wouldn't have minded if they had.

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source: nytimes.com

Quote:
The Wedding March
Photographs by JONATHAN de VILLIERS
The road to marital bliss is paved with the to-do list from hell.


Jonathan De Villiers
Dress? Check. Flowers? Check. Laser surgery? Check. The road to marital bliss is paved with the to-do list from hell. On the following pages, our intrepid bride and groom (an actual couple-to-be whom we cast in a make-believe wedding) go through the strained emotions of nuptial planning, while a trio of brides tell how they navigated national security, sidestepped impending menu disaster, shed 10 years’ worth of facial skin and finally arrived at the moment of I do. Left: A-Z Wedding Journal by Daisy Arts, $20. At katespaperie.com. Hermès leather Globetrotter agenda, about $510. At Hermès stores. Kate Spade desk blotter in blush. At Kate Spade. Waterford pen. At www.samflax.com. Location: The Presidential Suite at the Waldorf Towers, New York, www.waldorf.com.
Stylist: Karin Bereson. Prop stylist: Isabelle Lumpkin. Casting: Miyazu Sato/Urban NYC. Bride: Kelly Brady. Groom: Walter Zegers. Hair: Eddie Teboul for Unite Eurotherapy/Latelier. Makeup: Eric Polito for Christian Dior at the Wall Group.



Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times
TO DO: REGISTER
Swag Party

The groom has his own ideas on how to whoop up his final bachelor days, but play the registry right and even an old-fashioned bridal tea party can turn into a real booty-fest.
Left: Jeri Kadison (in red suit) is a professional bridal coach. Among her many skills, she helps smooth communications with in-laws, caterers, friends who, ahem, digressed from the registry. . . . Clockwise from bottom: Mini cocottes in chartreuse by Staub USA Inc., $35 each. At chefsresource.com. Patrician wine goblets by Josef Hoffmann, $125 each. At the Neue Galerie New York, 1048 Fifth Avenue. Villa Palladio sterling silver serving dish by Buccellati, $1,300. At Buccellati, 750 Madison Avenue. Sterling silver banded pitcher, $3,750. At Tiffany & Company, 727 Fifth Avenue. Drip coffee maker by Dualit, $240. At the Conran Shop, 407 East 59th Street. Jacaranda punch bowl and ladle by Puiforcat, price upon request. At Hermès, (800) 238-5522. Open-weave throw in pink-orange, $155. At Jonathan Adler, 47 Greene Street. Photo album in embossed calf, $325. At Asprey, 725 Fifth Avenue. Chrome hand mixer by Dualit, $70. At the Conran Shop. Rococo Cumberland platter by Porzellan-Manufaktur Nymphenburg, $24,800. At Moss, 146 Greene Street. Giants Heliodor candlestick by Arik Levy for Gaia & Gino, $575. At Moss. Medium Linenfold sterling silver picture frame, $750. At Buccellati. Couteaux Bijoux No. 4 knife by Michel Bras, $345. At Moss. On table: Cindy Sherman limited-edition Madame de Pompadour porcelain teacups and saucers by Artes Magnus, $3,500 for 21-piece service. At Moss. Burgundy tea service. At fortunoff.com. Wrapping papers and ribbons: katespaperie.com.



Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times
From left: Silhouette cuckoo clock by Diamantini & Domeniconi, $278. At Anthropologie, (800) 309-2500. Dyson DC14 Animal vacuum cleaner, $549. At the Conran Shop, 407 East 59th Street. Linda lacquer vases, $40 for green, $50 for orange, $60 for red, $75 for blue. At TableArt, Los Angeles. At tartontheweb.com. Corian tray by FTF Design Studio, $350. At ftfdesignstudio.com. Lingerie by Agent Provocateur. Sloan Street barrel decanter, $125. At Kate Spade, 454 Broome Street. Toaster by Jasper Morrison for Rowenta, $135. At the Conran Shop. One-light Medallion candleholder, $1,050. At Baccarat, 625 Madison Avenue. Egyptian Butterfly queen-size duvet cover, $530, and shams, $126 each, by Christian Fischbacher. At Léron, 804 Madison Avenue. Tea kettle by All-Clad, $100. At Williams-Sonoma, Time Warner Center, 10 Columbus Circle. Villa Palladio sterling silver pitcher, $1,500. At Buccellati, 750 Madison Avenue. Flatout! Collapsible storage containers by Tupperware, $16.50 for set of three green or orange three-cup; $18 for set of three purple four-cup, $12.50 each for red eight-cup. At tupperware.com.


Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times
TO DO: CHOOSE RINGS
Wrapped Around Her Finger
He gets to select the D.J., so it’s only fair that she picks the bands.
Left: In hands, from left: Van Cleef & Arpels platinum-and-diamond snowflake band, $33,400. At Van Cleef & Arpels stores. Graff 9.67 carat pear-shaped and 5.65 carat heart-shaped white diamond-and-platinum eternity rings. Prices upon request. At Graff stores. On pad, from left: Cartier Trinity rings in 18 karat yellow, white and pink gold, $1,200 each. At Cartier boutiques. Bvlgari Marryme platinum band, $610. At Bvlgari, 730 Fifth Avenue. Van Cleef & Arpels platinum Toujours band, $1,300. At Van Cleef & Arpels. Bottom row, from left: Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Company Four Leaves diamond ring set in platinum and 18 karat yellow gold, $6,950, and Tiffany & Company Lucida 18 karat yellow gold band, $375. At Tiffany & Company, 727 Fifth Avenue. Bvlgari full pavé diamond wedding band in 18 karat white gold, $6,500, and Marryme platinum band, $870. At Bvlgari. Asprey Princess Cut Collection 18 karat yellow gold and diamond ring, $8,500, and Wedding Ring Collection 18 karat gold miligrain edge ring, $375. At www.asprey.com. Cartier Lanières ring in 18 karat yellow gold and diamonds, $4,325, and matching band, $750. At Cartier. In background: Tiffany Voile Diamond Three Row Necklace set in platinum, $70,000. At Tiffany & Company. Location: The Presidential Suite at the Waldorf Towers, N.Y. www.waldorf.com. Market editor: Anne LeBlanc.



Jonathan de Villiers for The New York Times
TO DO: REINSTATE VOWS
Here Comes the Bill
Did somebody say for richer, for poorer?
A make-believe bill for a make-believe wedding. Custom imprinted ribbon and napkins from Kate’s Paperie, (800) 809-9880. Kate Spade desk blotter in blush. At Kate Spade, 454 Broome Street. Paloma Picasso for Tiffany & Company sterling silver letter opener, $215. At Tiffany & Company. Location: The Presidential Suite at the Waldorf Towers, New York. www.waldorf.com.

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