How to Join
the Fashion Spot / Front Row / Designers and Collections
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Rules Links Mobile How to Join
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
06-12-2012
  346
V.I.P.
 
StoneSkipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Brazil
Gender: homme
Posts: 3,509
And you're quite right about that, sadly. D:

Status: Online
 
Reply With Quote
 
06-12-2012
  347
Soviet Camaro
 
tangerine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Barbary Coast
Gender: homme
Posts: 16,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by GERGIN View Post
That's not even where I was going with it. I just know people in real life who have come to me and said how bad it is that a Chinese person is designing for Balenciaga. I'm just proving that these racist comments have stirred up from people I know and I wouldn't have a doubt in my mind that people on here think that way too, not including myself.
That may be, but this line of discussion is not permitted on the forums, so let's all just drop it here.

__________________
after all, it was you and me
Status: Online
 
Reply With Quote
06-12-2012
  348
backstage pass
 
Phuel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Canada
Gender: homme
Posts: 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by GERGIN View Post
^
This is a huge stepping stone for Wang, he is finally being given the opportunity to take in the DNA of Balenciaga and incorporate designs he has never done in the past.
A huge stepping stone? Unless you know something about him I don't, he's always been hugely supported and hyped from the beginning of his career. And he's expanded with a secondary line and shoes and bags very quickly in a very short amount of time. So he's had many advantages-- whether it was the support of the industry, or the privilege of money. He's never been a struggling designer at any point. Now, whether I like his designs or not, is another matter-- or irrelevant in this case. But he's hardly been at any disadvantage in terms of exposure and opportunity. And his appointment as head of such a fabled house is obviously because of the salable brand he's created for his own label-- with the advantages of the hype, support of the industry and the privileges of money he's had for his business from the beginning.

I don't fault him for having either the hype/support and money. I only find his brand of high fashion not the least bit impressive-- certainly not for such a venerable house as Balenceiga, or to follow such an innovative talent as Nicolas Ghesquiere.

Wang's ethnicity should be completely irrelevant-- in an ideal world. But since politics have as much sway as talent, and with Wintour's influence, we all know talent has never been a priority, we can't dismiss Wang's Chinese ethnicity, what with China being a huge potential market.

  Reply With Quote
06-12-2012
  349
fashion insider
 
GERGIN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Gender: homme
Posts: 2,219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phuel View Post
A huge stepping stone? Unless you know something about him I don't, he's always been hugely supported and hyped from the beginning of his career. And he's expanded with a secondary line and shoes and bags very quickly in a very short amount of time. So he's had many advantages-- whether it was the support of the industry, or the privilege of money. He's never been a struggling designer at any point. Now, whether I like his designs or not, is another matter-- or irrelevant in this case. But he's hardly been at any disadvantage in terms of exposure and opportunity. And his appointment as head of such a fabled house is obviously because of the salable brand he's created for his own label-- with the advantages of the hype, support of the industry and the privileges of money he's had for his business from the beginning.

I don't fault him for having either the hype/support and money. I only find his brand of high fashion not the least bit impressive-- certainly not for such a venerable house as Balenceiga, or to follow such an innovative talent as Nicolas Ghesquiere.

Wang's ethnicity should be completely irrelevant-- in an ideal world. But since politics have as much sway as talent, and with Wintour's influence, we all know talent has never been a priority, we can't dismiss Wang's Chinese ethnicity, what with China being a huge potential market.
I'm not referring to his popularity, i'm referring to what he is going to gain as an experience for working with Balenciaga, he's going to induldge in the houses archives and get to know and understand the brand and what made Cristobal such an icon in the industry.

I'm incredibly proud of Alexander Wang, he has such a big heart and it was such an honour to meet him 2 years ago in Toronto when he was presenting his F/W 10.11 Collection. He's up there with the big leagues of American designers who have been able to design under Paris labels (Michael Kors for Celine, ODLR for Balmain, Marc Jacobs for LV, etc.).

__________________
[You Can't Fake It]
  Reply With Quote
07-12-2012
  350
windowshopping
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: California
Gender: homme
Posts: 33
When I first saw the news, I kept asking my how could it possible... I am more concern with his visionary. Balenceiga has been a unique and edgy house. Based on Wang's past designs, I am having a hard time seeing how he can fit in. I hope he proves me wrong.

  Reply With Quote
08-12-2012
  351
V.I.P.
 
Psylocke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Gender: femme
Posts: 10,896
Quote:
December 7, 2012
An American in Paris, Again
By ERIC WILSON

ALEXANDER WANG may be the savviest designer of his generation.

At 28, he is the rising star who built a global multimillion-dollar business in less than a decade, opened his own stores in New York and Beijing and, last week, landed a plum job at a prestigious label in Paris, when he was named the creative director of Balenciaga. Some see Mr. Wang’s appointment as symbolic of the triumph of youth; others see the demise of fashion.

“It was a coup for Alex, and a coup for American fashion,” said Diane von Furstenberg. But, she added, “he’s going to need some mentoring in Paris.”

In a way, it is fitting that Mr. Wang should become the first American designer to take on a big, historic European design house since Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors and Narciso Rodriguez went to Paris in the late 1990s. (Only Mr. Jacobs, with his role at Louis Vuitton, remains there.) While other young designers have occasionally been proposed for such lofty jobs, it is Mr. Wang who most perfectly represents his generation’s more accessible and business-minded approach to fashion. He also reflects the growing prominence of designers of Asian descent who are making their mark on the global stage.

He is young, energetic, engaged, streetwise and generally adorable. And like all great (meaning successful) designers, he recognized a crucial shift in the market well before its impact had been fully realized, in this case how the democratization of fashion would also lead to a gradual devaluation of the concept of luxury. He created a business with estimated sales of more than $60 million by making contemporary T-shirts, sweatshirts and shorts that look remarkably like high fashion. (His company does not release numbers.) Early in his career, when critics said he was too commercial, Mr. Wang said: “I don’t see that as a negative thing. It is something I actually enjoy.”

But it is for the same reasons that his appointment at Balenciaga — nearly a century-old fashion house that was thoroughly modernized over the last 15 years under the considered eye of Nicolas Ghesquière — bothers so many people, or at least the fashion purists. Some established designers, grumbling privately because they did not want to be seen as meanies, see the change as symbolic of a broader watering-down of creativity in fashion.

“They’re not fashion designers,” one New York designer said. “They’re fashion curators. They’re sitting at a computer copying other peoples’ ideas.” Even on Balenciaga’s Facebook page, alongside the many positive comments about Mr. Wang, one fan sniped, with Ghesquière gone, “who will Wang rip-off now?”

Their fear is that PPR, the luxury group that owns Balenciaga, as well as Gucci, Saint Laurent and Bottega Veneta, plans to take the label in a more commercial direction, or that the choice of Mr. Wang, as an Asian-American, was somehow an opportunistic play for the emerging luxury market in China.

Mr. Wang’s command of the Chinese market and his fluency in Mandarin were not overlooked by executives at Balenciaga, but François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of PPR, said that they were not considered criteria for his recruitment. He nevertheless described Mr. Wang’s heritage as “an extra value,” noting that he will bring more exposure to the brand worldwide.

Responding to the question of handing the keys to one of the most famous names in fashion to a designer so young, Mr. Pinault argued that, when Mr. Ghesquière began designing Balenciaga in the mid-1990s, “he was designing uniforms for Air France, and who would have said that Nicolas would become such a great talent?”

Anna Wintour, the editor of Vogue, who championed Mr. Wang for the job, also scoffed at concerns about his age.

“Oh, please, come on,” she said. “How great is it to be young? That is when designers are at their most fearless. That is when you do your most creative work.”

When Mr. Ghesquière was named chief designer there, in 1997, he was just 25.

ON Nov. 5, in a major surprise, Balenciaga announced that Mr. Ghesquière was leaving. His vision for the house, combining a reverence for the archives of Cristóbal Balenciaga with high-tech fabric treatments and elements inspired by science fiction, was so transformative that Style.com/Print recently described it as “the standard by which other big house revivals are judged.” The business grew to include 62 stores and, Mr. Pinault said, sales have expanded substantially since it was acquired by Gucci Group (as PPR was formerly known) in 2001. But Balenciaga is an expensive business to operate.

There were demands for more commercial styles and reissues of his earlier designs, leading to what retailers described as a confusing assortment in the stores, and, according to several colleagues of Mr. Ghesquière, the designer’s frustration.

Isabelle Guichot, the chief executive of Balenciaga since 2007, said in a telephone interview on Thursday that the role of a designer in today’s industry demands a quality that she called “creative realism.”

Last month, when the company began a search for its next designer, there was a short list of candidates. Christopher Kane, the young English designer who recently consulted on Versace’s Versus collection, was reportedly one of them. Mr. Wang, Ms. Guichot said, was the “top choice.” Mr. Pinault, who makes the final decision on the hiring of designers, approved.

“We’re not asking him to be an entrepreneur,” Ms. Guichot said. “But luxury fashion is a business with some rules, and he understood that very early in his career, without ever compromising the creativity.”

Among the observations made on the hiring of Mr. Wang, who has a strong accessories business, having astutely positioned his handbags at the lowest end of the luxury category, is that PPR was looking for its own version of what Mr. Jacobs brought to Louis Vuitton.

“There were some feelings after what happened with John Galliano at Dior that the brands were promoting the individual designers too much,” the veteran consultant Robert Burke said. “Now they’re thinking, what is it going to take to keep a brand relevant and alive?”

Linda Fargo, the fashion director for Bergdorf Goodman, said there are real “design chops” in Mr. Wang’s collections. Asked about the complaints that he copies, she said: “I hands-down do not agree with that. I think he’s incredibly original.”

MR. WANG grew up in California. His parents, who had emigrated from China, had a successful plastics manufacturing business that they later moved to Shanghai. Among his classmates at Drew in San Francisco was Victoria Traina, who now works in fashion in New York and was a big influence on Mr. Wang’s look, often described as “off-duty model” for its slouchy ease and street-wear feeling. Beginning in 2002, he attended Parsons the New School for Design for two years, while working as an intern at Vogue and for the designer Derek Lam.

Then, like many now-famous designers have done, he dropped out to start his own fashion label. With his sister-in-law, Aimie Wang, he started a line of sweaters: six pieces that were sold on consignment. The reaction was so strong that Mr. Wang had a full ready-to-wear collection by 2007, when he became one of the hottest names on the New York fashion calendar. His family remains involved in the privately controlled business, which now has about 140 employees. He will continue to design his own label.

And there was never really any question that it would be that way. Ms. Wintour recalled Mr. Wang’s appeal for the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund award (a prize he won in 2008). “He was so articulate,” she said. “He said he wants to dress the girls of his age and his generation. That’s what you see in everything he does. He lives and breathes the Alex brand.”

Ms. von Furstenberg, who was assigned to mentor Mr. Wang after the competition, recalled walking into his showroom for the first time. “There wasn’t very much there, but it was all very clear,” she said. “His clarity is part of his talent. He knows who he is.”

Part of Mr. Wang’s appeal is his connection to the street. He associates with the cool photographers and provocative musicians, and despite showing at the beginning of each season, has his radar attuned to the models of the moment. These qualities were also attractive to Balenciaga. Mr. Ghesquière is one of the best designers at adapting the reality of the everyday life with a strong vision for modernity, and Mr. Pinault said he expects Mr. Wang to build upon that legacy.

Making it profitable will also be important. Tapping into emerging markets like China, India and Brazil will be crucial. In New York last week, while not going so far as to say Mr. Wang was hired because of his heritage, Mr. Pinault gave the impression that it was an advantage.

Increasing profits in countries where luxury is a mature business is very tough, Mr. Pinault said. But In China, where the potential is so strong that economic growth of 5 to 7 percent is seen as a bad year, the possibilities are endless. Making a profit there, he said, “is an easy job.”

Cathy Horyn contributed reporting.
nytimes.com

Great article. It raises many of the points that were discussed in this thread, too. And it seems quite honest. I love that quote that I made bold. It's very true, but it's still interesting to see how fashion critics aren't afraid of voicing their skepticism on Wang's move to Balenciaga!

  Reply With Quote
08-12-2012
  352
V.I.P.
 
Melancholybaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Greece
Gender: homme
Posts: 8,581
^Nice to see a confirmation that once again Anna had a hand in this.

__________________
An oasis of horror in a desert of boredom
  Reply With Quote
08-12-2012
  353
V.I.P.
 
Pradable's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Colombia
Gender: homme
Posts: 4,957
PPR is becoming in a huge joke.

__________________
'I am so fab, check out I'm blonde, I'm skinny, I'm rich and I'm a little bit of a bitch'
  Reply With Quote
08-12-2012
  354
V.I.P.
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Atlanta
Gender: femme
Posts: 4,078
HAHAHAHA...as soon as I saw that Alex was named to the house, I knew people would flip their sh!ts, and here we are. I've never been much of a fan of Balenciaga, so I really don't care. I am interested in seeing what direction he takes it in, however. (Perhaps now we'll no longer be seeing the same outfit 10 times per collection in different colors. *snort*)

  Reply With Quote
09-12-2012
  355
backstage pass
 
Phuel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Canada
Gender: homme
Posts: 717
Quote:
Originally Posted by GERGIN View Post
I'm not referring to his popularity, i'm referring to what he is going to gain as an experience for working with Balenciaga, he's going to induldge in the houses archives and get to know and understand the brand and what made Cristobal such an icon in the industry.

I'm incredibly proud of Alexander Wang, he has such a big heart and it was such an honour to meet him 2 years ago in Toronto when he was presenting his F/W 10.11 Collection. He's up there with the big leagues of American designers who have been able to design under Paris labels (Michael Kors for Celine, ODLR for Balmain, Marc Jacobs for LV, etc.).
OK, gotcha. I'm glad his fans are excited by this obviously tremendous opportunity for him. I was there that day at Holt's and saw the ruckus-- but I didn't see him. I don't know him, nor would I say anything negatively about him personally. Based on his work, I don't think he's talented-- certainly not for heading Balenciaga. Maybe in time Wang will change my mind, but his style of design and the hype and industry support he gets-- it's all too Marc Jacobs v2.0-- and I've never liked Marc Jacobs, both personally and professionally, and even with so many opportunities and so much time, Marc's yet to prove his talent as a strong designer (rip-off artist, yes), to me anyways... At least Wang seems to be a decent personality.

  Reply With Quote
09-12-2012
  356
Soviet Camaro
 
tangerine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Barbary Coast
Gender: homme
Posts: 16,323
There is now a thread for rumors about Ghesquière's next move
If you want to discuss what is next for Ghesquière, there is a thread for it here.

http://forums.thefashionspot.com/f60...re-199105.html

__________________
after all, it was you and me

Last edited by tangerine; 09-12-2012 at 10:01 PM.
Status: Online
 
Reply With Quote
10-12-2012
  357
V.I.P.
 
Label Basher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Gender: femme
Posts: 13,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Psylocke View Post
[SIZE="1"]“They’re not fashion designers,” one New York designer said. “They’re fashion curators. They’re sitting at a computer copying other peoples’ ideas.” Even on Balenciaga’s Facebook page, alongside the many positive comments about Mr. Wang, one fan sniped, with Ghesquière gone, “who will Wang rip-off now?”
Fess up which one of us said this lol.

__________________
ROBBER - Get down on the ground. Face down. C'mon. CHER - Oh, no. You don't understand, this is an Alaïa.
ROBBER - An a-what-a?
CHER - It's like a totally important designer.
  Reply With Quote
12-12-2012
  358
front row
 
moss trey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Gender: femme
Posts: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Label Basher View Post
Fess up which one of us said this lol.
haha! Right?!

  Reply With Quote
12-12-2012
  359
V.I.P.
 
Caffeine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: North Williamsburg, NY
Gender: femme
Posts: 3,704
Basically PPR is trying to change Balenciaga to a commercial house from a CREATIVE house. Sad. I could never link Wang with Balenciaga...when did he ever show originality?

  Reply With Quote
12-12-2012
  360
Stitch:the Hand
 
Scott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Among the trees
Gender: homme
Posts: 12,876
you know that's what is so hilarious about that article because i see words like creative and original being bandied about in equation to his work. and these from so-called professionals? no digs here but it's clear to me that our industry folk are horrendously delusional if they see either of those qualities in his work.

  Reply With Quote
Reply
Previous Thread | Next Thread »

Tags
alexander, balenciaga, ghesquière, replaced, update, wang, ways
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

monitoring_string = "058526dd2635cb6818386bfd373b82a4"


 
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:20 PM.
Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
TheFashionSpot.com is a property of TotallyHer Media, LLC, an Evolve Media LLC company. ©2014 All rights reserved.