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22-04-2012
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Frida Giannini, Creative Director of Gucci

gucci.com

From gucci.com
Quote:
FRIDA GIANNINI
Creative Director of Gucci


Frida Gianniniís unique talent and modern vision have fueled her rise as the leading creative force behind one of the worldís most celebrated fashion houses.

Born in Rome in 1972 to an architect father and art history professor mother, Giannini studied fashion design at Romeís Fashion Academy before apprenticing in a small ready-to-wear house. In 1997, she went to Fendi where she worked as a ready-to-wear designer for three seasons before being named designer for Fendi leathergoods.

In September 2002 she joined Gucci as Handbag Design Director. Two years later she was appointed to a newly created post, Creative Director of Accessories, where she assumed unprecedented control of bags, shoes, luggage, small leathergoods, silks, fine jewelry, gifts, watches as well as eyewear. Giannini flourished in this expanded role, and brought a powerful new perspective to Gucciís accessories collections.

Using the Gucci archives as a starting point, she transformed house classics such as the Flora scarf pattern and equestrian iconography into novel and hugely successful designs.

In 2005, she was named Creative Director of Gucci Womenís ready-to-wear, in addition to her responsibility for all accessories. In 2006, she took over menswear, thus rising to sole Creative Director of the label. Giannini accepted this significant responsibility with aplomb, quickly establishing her individual stamp on the house. Her design approach and focused management style are informed by sharp confidence and decisiveness, as well as her uniquely feminine and distinctly Italian point of view.

The combination has proven to be powerful, as witnessed by her consistent ability to design collections, which not only influence global fashion trends but that are also directional at retail.

Using the Gucci archives as a starting point, she transformed house classics such as the Flora scarf pattern and equestrian iconography into novel and hugely successful designs.

In 2005, she was named Creative Director of Gucci Womenís ready-to-wear, in addition to her responsibility for all accessories. In 2006, she took over menswear, thus rising to sole Creative Director of the label. Giannini accepted this significant responsibility with aplomb, quickly establishing her individual stamp on the house. Her design approach and focused management style are informed by sharp confidence and decisiveness, as well as her uniquely feminine and distinctly Italian point of view.

The combination has proven to be powerful, as witnessed by her consistent ability to design collections, which not only influence global fashion trends but that are also directional at retail.

Her broadening profile has allowed for increased social responsibility as well. She is deeply dedicated to and instrumental in Gucciís continued partnership with UNICEF, and in February 2011, the US Fund for UNICEF recognized her with the inaugural Woman of Compassion award. In addition, Giannini is also on the Board of Directors of PPRís Foundation for Womenís Dignity and Rights, an organization which fights violence against women and promotes their empowerment.

Gianniniís tenacity and unwavering vision have steered Gucci successfully into its 21st century guise. She is a new voice in fashion, one that champions a lighter luxury for modern times. Her innovative designs are a very personal interpretation of this venerable House: not only does she extract the very best of Gucci, but she has kept its privileged heritage firmly intact. Gianniniís strength of character and creative direction have earned her the Lupa Capitolina, awarded by the Mayor of Rome Gianni Alemanno, and a Design Star Honor from Fashion Group International.

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From wwd.com

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Frida Giannini's Asian Tour
April 19, 2012
By Cynthia Martens

HEADING EAST: Gucci is feeling the love in Asia. On April 21, creative director Frida Giannini will participate in three events in Shanghai: a cocktail gathering in honor of Chinese actress Li Bing Bing, who appears in the brandís new accessories ad campaign; Gucciís first fashion show in China, where high-wattage guests (including Hilary Swank, Lapo Elkann and Bing, among others) will view the fall 2012 collection and preview next seasonís lineup, and a party at the Gucci Club on the Rock Bund, where Gucci PremiŤre gowns will be on display and DJs 2ManyDJs, Michel Gaubert, Bryan Ferry and Isaac Ferry will perform.

Giannini will then whirl through Seoul on April 23 to celebrate the reopening of the Gucci flagship there. She will also partake in a lunch at the Korea Furniture Museum, or KOFUM, to inaugurate ďTimeless Touch of Craftsmanship: Korean Heritage Meets 91 Years of Gucci Archive,Ē a new exhibit showcasing 80 samples from the Italian labelís Florentine archives alongside the work of Korean furniture craftsmen, inside a Hanok, or traditional Korean home. The exhibition will run from April 25 through May 12.

KOFUM is composed of assorted Hanoks rescued from destruction, and it currently houses 1,500 pieces of furniture from a 300-year time span.

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From daylife.com / Getty Images
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SHANGHAI, CHINA - APRIL 21: Frida Giannini attends her first Gucci Fashion Show in China and after-party (with Patrizio di Marco) on April 21, 2012 in Shanghai, China.





Shanghai Flagship Store




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From vogue.co.uk

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Frida Giannini
Bibby Sowray
11 May 2011

As creative director of Gucci, Frida Giannini holds the reins of one of Italy's most powerful fashion houses. Following in the footsteps of Tom Ford was never going to be easy, but Giannini has garnered glowing reviews for her fresh, feminine take on contemporary fashion.
  • She was born in Rome in 1972 to an architect father and art history professor mother.

  • Giannini studied fashion design at Rome's Fashion Academy, then went on to apprentice at a small-scale ready-to-wear house.

  • 1997 saw her move to Fendi, where she designed ready-to-wear for three seasons before being promoted to designer of leather goods.

  • In 2002 she became design director of handbags at Gucci, her first role for the Italian fashion house.

  • In 2004 Tom Ford left Gucci and Giannini was promoted to creative designer of all accessories - a job which saw her delve into the archives to update classics such as the Flora scarf pattern.

  • 2005 saw Giannini further promoted to creative director of women's ready-to-wear at Gucci, as well as continuing her role as designer of all accessories.

  • In 2006 she took over menswear as well, and thus became creative director of the whole label. She was also responsible for developing a new retail concept for Gucci's stores, and also has creative control over the advertising campaigns, which have featured James Franco and Claire Danes.

  • Giannini has been instrumental in working on projects regarding Gucci's continued partnership with UNICEF, having collaborated with singer Rihanna on the Tattoo Heart range of bags, which raised funds for children in Africa, in July 2008.

  • Giannini described Florence and The Machine frontwoman Florence Welch as her inspiration for Gucci's autumn/winter 2011 collection. "As I was imagining this collection I was thinking of a strong and somewhat mysterious muse. Florence is that kind of woman," she explained. "She has a powerful personality and an entrancing quality to her performances. She also has that confident and self-assured look that goes hand in hand with the Gucci woman." Soon after the collection was shown it was revealed that Gucci would design Florence's stage outfits for her North American tour.

  • Speaking of her knack for picking emerging talent - such as James Franco, Rihanna and Mark Ronson - to feature in Gucci campaigns, Giannini said: "I chose to work with all three of them before they became as popular culturally as they are today. I think Gucci has been successful in bridging past and present. We have a rich and storied past, but we always have an eye to the future, which these collaborations represent."

  • On February 11 2011, she was honoured by UNICEF for her key contributions to UNICEF's mission to save and improve children's lives worldwide. The awards were bestowed at the inaugural Women of Compassion Luncheon.

  • Patrizio de Marco, ceo of Gucci, has praised Giannini's innate talent at moving the brand forward. "She knows how to balance the fashion elements with Gucci's heritage. I don't have to tell Frida to do anything other than to be herself, she's made beautiful products from the beginning."

SEE FRIDA'S 15 FAVOURITE FASHION ICONS

SEE THE GUCCI SHOW ARCHIVE

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ugh, that woman...

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From her first show for Spring Summer 2006 until her recent show for Fall Winter 2012/13...




*Vogue.co.uk

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*Vogue.co.uk

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*Vogue.co.uk

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Chanelcouture09, thank you so much for the retrospective.

In recent seasons I have grown to really like and respect Frida Giannini's aesthetic and skills as a designer, I consider her more of a pragmatic / brain designer than an artistic / heart designer, but still the clothes are beautiful and the collections are well done. However one criticism is that I don't care for how she cuts and fits pants - they seem long and bunched, and looking at the pictures above and the one in post #3, I guess it is a deliberate thing and that is the way that she likes her pants to fit.


Last edited by agee; 22-04-2012 at 12:55 PM.
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finally a thread for Frida!

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Quote:
FRIDA GIANNINI
By TIM BLANKS
Photography INEZ VAN LAMSWEERDE & VINOODH MATADIN


In February, a Nielsen survey revealed that Gucci was still the most coveted luxury label in the world. Not bad, considering the high-profile turmoil that marked the house following Tom Ford's departure in the early years of this century. The woman who steered the ship back to calmer (and more lucrative) waters is a shrewd young Roman named Frida Giannini. Hired away from Fendi by Ford to design accessories, she has risen through the ranks to assume full creative control. Now she's spinning the Gucci good life with her own take on boho rock 'n' roll. Speaking of spinning, there are more than 7,000 albums in her music room at home in Florence-although she admits that she's a disaster at mixing. She lets her DJ friends take charge after her dinner parties. That must be one of the rare moments when she -surrenders control.

TIM BLANKS: What are you working on now?

FRIDA GIANNINI: One million things at the same time. Basically, I am working now on the men's fashion show because it is the next appointment. But we have already started with the women's fashion show for September. I just finished the Cruise collection last week. We're going to show it in Rome for the 70th anniversary of the Rome store.

TB: I read that you're doing the show in Gianicolo, the neighborhood where you grew up.

FG: Yes. Not only that, but it's in the villa where I had my wedding party, purely by chance!

TB: While you're designing the men's collection and looking forward to the women's, are you imagining them together?

FG: Now, yes. With men, you need to anticipate all your ideas at least one or two months before the next women's collection, so you need to create a feeling that links with what will happen a few months later. To me, they are really a couple. They live together. They grew up in Italy together. So, not just in the stores or the campaigns, but also in real life, it's very important for me to create a connection between them.

TB: That Russian story you're telling in the men's and women's collections for fall makes that connection the strongest it's ever been. Interesting, because when you took over in 2006, the original energy reminded me of the Via Veneto, a very Roman mood. What is it about Russia that's capturing your imagination?

FG: Well, Russia was not the main inspiration. Of course, Russia was inspiring the fabrics and the textile designs, but the idea was more rock star and the bohemian idea of rock 'n' roll-that sort of decadence, but in a luxurious way that to me is always present.

TB: After the last men's show you said to me that what Rome and Russia have in common is this energy where you could reinvent yourself every day if you wanted to. Do you think you've reinvented yourself since you came to Gucci?

FG: You need to reinvent yourself every day when you are doing creative work. I always say that the moment I feel I'm at the top of the mountain and I cannot do more, I would be finished. So that's why I always feel the earth quake beneath my feet. I always feel myself on the fire. Because I think this is something that gives you the right adrenaline to work and go forward in your professional life. I have reinvented myself, believe me, many times in my life! [laughs]

TB: Your own personal style is very straightforward, so when I look at it versus the rock 'n' roll, groupie, gypsy, Gucci man and woman, I wonder if this is your fantasy of how you would like to be.

FG: When I approach a collection, I never think too much about myself, because doing fashion and being a designer, you need to dream. Of course, there's always a part of myself. I'm always wearing what I'm doing. I'm not a party girl, but when I have the opportunity to go out and dance and be crazy for a night, that's the fall/winter collection.

TB: That's why model Natasha Poly is such a dream alter ego. She's the ideal Gucci gypsy with a hint of danger. But you're using Claire Danes in your campaigns as well, and that's a very different mood.

FG: Claire Danes was chosen for the fine-jewelry campaign. We used Drew Barrymore a year ago, and we wanted to elaborate on this idea of celebrity-a young actress, a modern golden blonde. They go very well together. And fine jewelry has a long-lasting value, so I didn't want to use a model who may stop working in a year or so or who may reschedule to do other campaigns.

TB: And James Franco is the face of the new Gucci fragrance for men.

FG: To me, Franco has the dangerous rebel side of the Gucci guy of today. He's a natural. Of course, he's not a rock star, but it was difficult for me to find a rock star with such a beautiful face at this moment in the world. [laughs]

TB: Is working on the campaigns a kind of release or an escape from all the pressure of being responsible for Gucci's sales figures?

FG: I don't know. The pressure is always very high. I am the client, and when I am the client, I need to fight with the photographer or with the stylists or with all the people that are on the set, because I am the only one who has a very specific vision. I always have the pressure, either from myself or from the company. I am a control freak. It's part of my culture. I know that I am still working to build a Frida moment at Gucci.

TB: Before, you let the brand speak without you, yourself, being so visible in public. Now I see you hosting the UNICEF gala in New York or the event in Los Angeles, and it seems you're more comfortable being in the spotlight.

FG: "Comfortable" is a great word. I cannot tell you that I am 100-percent comfortable, but for sure I am more confident of my goals, because I know what I can expect from this kind of event. At the beginning, everything was a mysterious, far-from-me world, and now it's more accessible. Of course, exposing myself is always very difficult. I cannot say that I'm a shy person, but I don't see myself as a superstar. [laughs] I will never see myself like that.

TB: What's the easiest way to break the ice when you meet Madonna or another huge star?

FG: I think the simplest way is probably to try playing on the same level, to discuss everything in normal life. So, for example, with Katie Holmes, we just spent one hour talking about her daughter. Or with Madonna, when we were working on the event in New York, we spent hours deciding every single aspect together, from the dishes to the flowers to the cards.

TB: But you must think back to being a teenage girl in Rome listening to Madonna records. It must be an odd feeling.

FG: Believe me. Now I feel much more relaxed, but the week before my first meeting with her last October in London, I was totally paralyzed. I would continually say to my friends, "You cannot imagine, I have to go to the house of Madonna." There was no other name to put in there that could compare with that for me.

TB: Not even the house of David Bowie?

FG: No, I don't think so. I have a different approach with men in general. [laughs] It was very tough with Madonna at the beginning of the meeting because I was very embarrassed. But I'm a strong woman who knows what I want and what I'm doing, and I think that when you have very clear ideas in your life, you can have conversations with everyone.

TB: What did you mean when you said the control-freak thing is part of your culture?

FG: I mean that even the education I got from my parents and my family was a strong preparation for this job. I always had a very strong sense of responsibility, so the minute I started to work in fashion, I was always tremendously serious-too much sometimes. Of course, you can make a lot of mistakes in this job-I still do-but you need to limit them as much as possible. When you're responsible for such a huge company, you cannot play too much. In the beginning, I was working 20 hours per day and I was going crazy. I learned that I needed to delegate and to trust the people around me, but there is still not one element that I don't see or edit or discuss with my people.

TB: How many people are working with you?

FG: In all categories, I have about 20 designers. Then I have people who are more technical assistants. In the end, I think there are more or less 40.

TB: Are you a tough boss?

FG: Sometimes. I'm used to spending a lot of time with them. They're not only collaborators, they're also friends. It's the biggest part of your life that you share with these people. But sometimes being on the top of this pyramid, you need to be a little bit tough. This job is becoming very tough for every company because of timing. You don't have the time to finish the collection before you have to think about the next one. But I am never loud. I don't like to scream. So we are all working hard, and sometimes you need to reassure them.

TB: But when you have that much responsibility all the time, do you ever just wake up in the middle of the night, screaming, "Oh, God, I just can't do this anymore"?

FG: I wake up in the night screaming sometimes when I've had a fight with my husband, more than with the company. [laughs] I still sleep very well. I take it day by day. I am a very pragmatic person. That's how I survive.

TB: As a Roman who lives and works in Florence, do you think Romans are tougher?

FG: Yes, definitely.

TB: And do you think they are more tribal?

FG: I don't know if tribal is the correct word. I think they are more open, probably because of all the tourists that fill the city all year. I think there is pride in the Roman people. Romans are proud more than tribal.

TB: I say tribal because it feels to me what you're doing in your collections is creating a tribe, especially with the most recent ones. The sense of a group identity being projected through fashion was very strong. You don't see the Gucci man and the Gucci woman being like anybody else. That's what I mean about the tribal quality. It's the sensuousness as well. I think tribalism is quite sexy, and that's what I was feeling, too.

FG: Yes, I understand what you mean. I can see this world perfectly, not only in the collection, but in Gucci as a brand in general. It has this very strong, specific DNA, and when you capture that, it's very immediate.

TB: Do you read your reviews?

FG: Yes, of course. Every time. I read them all. Sometimes they can be very constructive, sometimes not, but it's always interesting to see the opinion of others on what you are doing. Sometimes I am very furious, but I will never say to a journalist, "Please don't come back to the next show." Never. Because I think that's a very stupid attitude. I am very happy when I see the results of the company and when I see people wearing my clothes or my accessories. I think this is the best answer to criticism.

TB: Do you think your customers understand you better than your critics.

FG: For sure. But I have to tell you, a few people had very controversial feelings about what I was doing with Gucci at the beginning, and now, after a couple of years, they are changing their minds. I want to give journalists the time and space to know me and what I'm doing better. But it's not a priority for me. At the end of the day, I am not an artist; I am not doing a performance; I'm doing things that need to be sold. And I know my job.

TB: Well, thank you, Frida. Do you have one word for spring as a preview for me?

FG: I can tell you . . . happiness. [laughs]

TB: Good answer. That makes me happy.
*Interviewmagazine.com

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Quote:
FRIDA GIANNINI
By DAVE GAHAN
Photography MERT ALAS, MARCUS PIGGOTT


In addition to fashion, which she creates for a living, and music, which she listens to constantly and collects voraciously in styl- ishly antiquated vinyl form, Frida Giannini is a bit of a gearhead. In fact, she claims to have come up with some of her best ideas in cars. So itís appropriate that as Giannini attempts to make good use of whatís left of the summer by shuttling between her office in Rome and her beach house in the town of Sabaudia (on the Italian coast) behind the wheel of her Audi Q7 SUV, the Gucci designer would take the opportunity to contemplate the Italian houseís yearlong celebration of its 90th anniversary. That mile marker is punctuated by the recent launch of the 1921 Collectionóa line of ready-to-wear clothes and accessories inspired by some of the more iconic materials and moments in Gucciís historyóand a blowout event set to take place next month at the new Gucci museum in the companyís original hometown of Florence, where many items from the run of the houseís vast archives will be made available for public viewing for the first time.

For most of Gianniniís tenure at Guccióserving as a designer for the last nine years and the houseís creative director for the last fiveóoutrunning the past has been a complicated endeavor, both in terms of the near-mythic aura that surrounds founder Guccio Gucciís beginnings as a purveyor of leather goods and luggage, whose earnest admiration for luxe handiwork beget an interna- tional empire, and in terms of the more palpable aura that still surrounds the labelís previous creative director, Tom Ford. But Giannini has acquitted herself ably on all fronts, crafting a new chapter in the Gucci story by embracing her own ultra-feminine take on fashion, one that doesnít so much wrestle with what was, or the iconographic power of those interlocking Gs, as display an unbridled enthusiasm for what is and what might be if we could only find a way to chill out and live in the now.

Depeche Mode front man Dave Gahan recently connected with the 38-year-old Giannini, who was in Florence for work, to discuss Gucciís big nine-oh and why itís important to at least peek in the rearview before racing off into the future.

DAVE GAHAN: Congratulations on the anniversary.

FRIDA GIANNINI: Thank you very much.

GAHAN: Iím sure itís an amazing thing to be part of something thatís lasted so long. I sort of know how that feels, having been in a band thatís been around . . . not quite as long as Gucci, but, you know, weíve been together for 31 years now, and when you look back on that, itís quite an achievement. Thereís a lot of his- tory. Your more recent collections reference the history of Gucci maybe a bit more than your collections did when you first started. When you first went into the Gucci archives, what did you find?

GIANNINI: Well, when I joined Gucci in 2002, I immediately wanted to make a research trip into the archives because Iíd heard about how incredible they were, but I never had the opportunity to visit them. But, I tell you, I was shocked when I got into them, because the Gucci archives are full of all these incredible objects and items from about the í40s through the í60s and í70s. There are these incredible handbags and pieces of home furniture or objects for lifestyle, like tennis or golf. They did many designs for cars and seats in the í70s, and there are all these original draw- ings of prints and flowers, which are also tremendously inspiring for me because I can pick some older design or object and rework itóbring it to new life. In designing for Gucci, I always love to make some sort of stylistic marriage between past, present, and future, because this brand has a huge history. Thereís 90 years of tradition and ideas about excellence and expertise in luxury goods and craftsmanship that have been handed down over generations. We still have some suppliers working with us today who are the sons and daughters of the old suppliers who used to work for the original Gucci family at the beginning of the last century. So itís nice to always create this balance between what has been done in the past and what you want to do in the future.

GAHAN: I like to do the same thing with music. Itís important for me to know where music evolved from and bring it to the future. I actually wanted to ask you, is it correct that you have a room in your house where you have over 7,000 vinyl records?

GIANNINI: I have 8,000 now, but yes. [laughs]

GAHAN: I understand itís one of your favorite rooms.

GIANNINI: Yes, it is. The reason I have all these vinyl records is that my uncle was a DJ who was quite popular in Italy in the í80s. Unfortunately he was in a car accident and passed away at the end of the í80s. But he was basically like my big brother because there wasnít much difference in age between me and him. So I inher- ited this collection of vinyl records, which at that time numbered 6,000, and Iíve since continued to collect music. As you know, vinyl records can be very heavy, so every time I have to move into a new house, I need to build a complete new wall of shelves to put all these records, which is a nightmare for the architect. But I have to say, Iím so proud because itís really special for me to have this collection. I have many memories of the music of my uncle, and also because there are so many beautiful covers. I love the covers of vinyl records.



GAHAN: How did you first get interested in fashion? Was it through music? Or was it something that you were interested in independently?

GIANNINI: Well, I always loved the look of musicians. Iíve always admired them because they have a lookówhen I was growing up, it seemed that the ones I liked didnít need to have a stylist. Now there is this trend where everyone has a stylist, or follows the suggestions of a stylist, from designers on down. But I have some memories of looking at David Bowie in the í70s, and he had this look that was so authentic and original, which I think is more genuine in a way for a musician, and also very intriguing from the designerís point of view. I grew up in Rome, in actually what I would say was a liberal, open-minded family. My father was an architect and my mother was a teacher of art history, so it was sort of intellectual, and maybe a bit much for me when I was a child. But it was quite interesting when I was growing up. I have to say that my passion for designing and draw- ing was immediateóI drew all the time when I was 4, 5 years old. My grandmother also had a boutique in Rome. Now sheís almost 90 years old, and she just closed her boutique 10 years ago. But I have many memories of playing with the mannequins and bits of fabric and clothes in the shop window and in the shop upstairs from my grandmotherís. So I donít know . . . Maybe I was in love with fashion, with clothes, since I was a child. But when I was a teenager, it was music. I listened to a lot of music. I loved Depeche Mode. [laughs] I remember when I was 15 years old I was trying to imitate Madonna and look like she did in ďLike a VirginĒ with the lace gloves, leggings, and everything like that. I dyed my hair and all these kinds of things. So fashion was about a kind of expression for me.

GAHAN: Thatís interesting, because those two thingsómusic and fashionósort of went together for me as well. After high school I went to art college, but I became much more interested in the way that fashion and music combined, because when I was a teenager, punk music had arrived in England with the Sex Pis- tols and The Clash and The Damned, and the whole style of being individual and dressing differently, which appealed to me. Like you, I also grew up with David Bowie and T. Rex and these bands that were much larger than life. I would watch them per- form on TV as a teenager, and I wasnít very good at a lot of things, but I felt like I could do what those guys did.

GIANNINI: That influence, and the connection between music and fashion in the U.K., was strong at that time, right?

GAHAN: Yeah, it was really a powerful thing. For a short time I actually studied fashionófor about a yearóand some of my friends were going on to Central Saint Martins [College of Art & Design] in London, so I thought I might take that route. But Depeche Mode was beginning, and we had created a little follow- ing, so I decided to go that route.

GIANNINI: Well, at a certain point, I made the decision to study fashion. I remember having a great discussion with my parents because they wanted me to go to a more conservative university and to study something safer, but I insisted and pushed to study fashion, and so I started at the [Fashion] Academy in Rome when I was 19 years old, and afterwards I went to work for some more ready-to-wear houses in Rome before I moved to Fendi, and eventually came to Gucci as the head designer of handbags. And my career at Gucci started at that time . . .

GAHAN: What inspires me is usually very visualó and it sounds like inspiration works like that for you, too. Where do you get inspiration from these days?

GIANNINI: Well, you know, inspiration for a designer can come from many different sides and directions, because you can be inspired by a place after a trip, or by an exhibition of art, or from music, as we were mentioning before, or from movies, from films. You can also be influenced by an age, like the í60s or í70s. This year, for example, I feel more í90s, or I want to see something more futuristic. So thereís not a specific rule I would say, because every six months I need to think of something new. It really depends on your mood or your personal life sometimes . . . I can tell you that sometimes I live a very good moment and Iím very joy- ful and optimistic, so I can see more bright colors in my collection. [laughs] Other times I feel so depressed and so sad and I see a lot of darkness. So it really depends. Of course, there are certain rules you have to operate by in terms of markets, and for summer and for winter. But at the end of the day, you are a person and you put a lot of yourself into the clothes. You know, I can never decide what I am going to wear on the day of the show. It depends a lot on which mood I wake up in that day, so I never know. You just never know. I think this is interest- ing for this job, no?

GAHAN: Yeah. [both laugh] So Iíd imagine youíre working a lot.

GIANNINI: Yeah, a lot.

GAHAN: What do you like to do when youíre not working?

GIANNINI: Well, I grew up in fashion. Iím still growing in fashion. But I love to do other things as well. I love architecture and design. I love to read books, especially on furniture, dťcor, and design. Of course, I still love music and going to con- certs. I also love horse riding, which is a big passion. I used to do horse riding in a competitive way until I was 18 years old and I started to work and it got too complicated for me, so now I go just for the weekend or in summertime when I have more time, because I need a lot of training for horse riding. You need to have good legs and good shoulders. I love cooking. I have big kitchens in my house in Rome and my other one on the beach because I love to spend a lot of time cutting vegetables, cooking fish, and all these kinds of things. I love to have a lot of friends in my house and to prepare dinner for them. And I love movies, even though Iím not a fan of the cinema. I donít like to go to the cinema because I feel very claustrophobic, so I prefer to watch a DVD at my house with a home theater. But thatís about it. [laughs] I would say that is more or less what Iím doing when Iím not working.

GAHAN: I know you love cars, and that you came up with the name for the Guilty fragrance while driving.

GIANNINI: Yes.

GAHAN: What kind of car do you drive?

GIANNINI: Actually, at this moment, I have the Q7SUV from Audi.

GAHAN: Well, thatís very interesting, because Iím driving the Audi R8, the V10.

GIANNINI: Oh, really? Well, you know, for me itís very helpful because I have a big dog. Heís a Ger- man shepherd, and sometimes when I have to move to my house on the beach I need to take a lot of stuff with me, as well as my friends and my dog. So I need to have big space in my car for all of that.

GAHAN: We have a big car too, because of the kids and the dogs and stuff. But then itís also my personal carómy toy.

GIANNINI: I am the same. I think itís more comfortable for me to drive a big car, because I feel safer than in a smaller one. Plus, itís cooler.

Dave Gahan is the lead singer of Depeche Mode.
*Interviewmagazine.com

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23-04-2012
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I love those black&white dress with green belt from resort collection at #6 Very cute.

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23-04-2012
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Frida in Shanghai

weibo

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23-04-2012
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I really admire her as a woman. She's one of the most intelligent in this industry in my opinion.

Plus, I love what she's doing for Martin Scorsese's Film Foundation for the restoration of old movies.


zimbio

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