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06-10-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zazie View Post
Seriously...to get all petulant over who first started designing skinny suits?? It's not like it's inventing the Theory of Relativity....
Hahah I sense an overdue Nobel Prize.

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06-10-2012
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With all the negative press Heidi's getting from this, I'm curious to see how Cathryn Horn will come out of this. She's had two run ins with designers this season (de la renta in NYC). Although Heidi's likely to remain unscathed here in the long run, I don't think she'll fare as well.

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06-10-2012
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^ Why, because she's the only person who was within miles of behaving like a rational adult? She is one of the top two fashion critics in the world. The two publicity hounds/tantrum-throwers are nowhere close to the top two designers. Cathy is going to be just fine.

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06-10-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haydn View Post
With all the negative press Heidi's getting from this, I'm curious to see how Cathryn Horn will come out of this. She's had two run ins with designers this season (de la renta in NYC). Although Heidi's likely to remain unscathed here in the long run, I don't think she'll fare as well.
I suspect It will increase The number of people following Cathy's articles, hoping to witness her next altercation.

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07-10-2012
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Originally Posted by thirdlooks View Post
hedi just deleted the tweets
after all this mess he's deleting the tweets? pathetic

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07-10-2012
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Originally Posted by balmain1914 View Post
I looked at new YSL bags and accessories, which are giant profit sources for a Fashion label. To be honest, they are quite disappointing comparing with the past items. If they can't sell bags well, it is not far to see that child gets fired again, no need to say couture.

Hiring a kid and giving him full control is the biggest mistake that Pinault has ever made. LVMH is notorious, but the CEO is smarter on picking people.
He's 44 Chronological age, that is He is my contemporary, and plenty old enough to know better. I can only conclude he hasn't been making good use of his time here.

The tweets sound like they were written by an undereducated twentysomething at best, which is one of the reasons I don't think he wrote them himself.

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07-10-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifer~ View Post
Hahah I sense an overdue Nobel Prize.
Or maybe Legion of Honor :p

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27-11-2012
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Was watching the Saint Laurent Spring 2013 video on youtube and I randomly read one comment regarding the whereabouts of YSL channel that suddenly vanished so I search YSL on youtube, the channel exists but the past videos (campaigns, Pilati's shows) are completely gone

http://www.youtube.com/user/ysl?feature=results_main

Looks like he really wants to start fresh..

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27-11-2012
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I just read that the Library of Congress archives all tweets, starting around the middle of the last decade. Not sure about YouTube, but I'm sure that stuff is still somewhere ... of course these particular tweets are immortalized here

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27-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flashbang View Post
Was watching the Saint Laurent Spring 2013 video on youtube and I randomly read one comment regarding the whereabouts of YSL channel that suddenly vanished so I search YSL on youtube, the channel exists but the past videos (campaigns, Pilati's shows) are completely gone

http://www.youtube.com/user/ysl?feature=results_main

Looks like he really wants to start fresh..
Who are these fashion houses trying to fool? Dior with Galliano, YSL, etc. It's the internet, once it's out there, it's out there. They don't control the internet, we will find the old pics/vids/files...

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16-01-2013
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Quote:
A First Look at Saint Laurent in the Stores
By ERIC WILSON

Hedi Slimane’s first designs for Saint Laurent, including his spring men’s wear and a women’s resort collection that had not previously been shown to the news media, began appearing in stores this week, giving customers their first opportunity to see the clothes up close. Barneys New York has a small selection of the men’s designs, including a cotton hoodie that costs nearly $1,000, and some women’s pieces like a minidress in an animal print ($4,490) are now available online.

But the best place to see the new work is at the Saint Laurent store at 3 East 57th Street. As of a few days ago, the store reflected Mr. Slimane’s vision, at least in terms of the clothes, accessories and music, which on Monday afternoon included a mix of Elvis Presley and the Rolling Stones. (The store itself will be redesigned later.)

Looking at the new bags (including the Betty, a simple design with folded corners on the flap, starting around $1,550, and a reversible, unisex suede tote for $1,450), the jewelry, the shoes and a modest array of clothes, you can identify some of Mr. Slimane’s design details. The zipper pulls, for example, are slightly bent. Fine mesh chains appear as a signature as well, inserted like a label inside the waistband of jeans or the collar of a jacket. They are silver on men’s wear and gold on women’s designs. On bags, the Saint Laurent logo appears in small gold type, similar to the current trend of discreet branding among other luxury labels like Hermès and Céline.

In the absence of much information coming from Mr. Slimane himself about his new work, the store gives perhaps some idea of where he is going. His women’s ready-to-wear collection, shown with much fanfare in Paris in October, will arrive in March, and retailers are practically salivating. There are certainly some inviting items already in the Saint Laurent store, and as with Mr. Slimane’s earlier work as the designer of Dior Homme, some are more approachable than others. A solid black leather backpack for $2,995 will undoubtedly find a home somewhere.

Some of the most interesting of the initial pieces are the shoes, including a $685 pump with a heel shaped like a single petal, or a flame that licks the back of the ankle. (Saint Laurent calls it the Paris Thorn, inspired by an image by Helmut Newton.) Mr. Slimane also offers several men’s shoe designs, including black sneakers and patent leather Chelsea boots, in women’s sizes. The big look for women, at least among what has already arrived in the store, is a tailored black wool jacket ($2,750) with grosgrain-trimmed lapels.

The men’s wear does recall his Dior Homme years, which is interesting given that the Dior Homme store where fashion customers once sought out Mr. Slimane’s designs is a few doors down the block on East 57th Street. At Saint Laurent, there are two styles of denim jeans, including skinny ones, that range in price from $295 to $495, novelty print dress shirts and a few clever takes on the tuxedo jacket (for men and women). But a classic navy suit for men ($2,195), beautifully made, was not tailored quite as aggressively as it might once have been at Dior.
nytimes

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04-03-2013
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He's cut the Yves from Saint Laurent, but can Hedi Slimane see off the critics?
He has been called 'the Prince of Darkness' – now Hedi Slimane unveils his latest collection in Paris

Kim Willsher in Paris and Karen Kay
The Observer, Saturday 2 March 2013 12.10 GMT

On Monday evening, a few hours after the sun has set on the vast glass roof of the historic Grand Palais in Paris, all eyes will be on the man described as "the Prince of Darkness".

Will the hollow-eyed fashion genius Hedi Slimane, the man appointed creative director at Yves Saint Laurent last year, rise from the catwalk to triumph over the critical forces of evil? Or will he be thrown to the impeccably groomed wolverines sitting in the front rows, much as the iconoclastic artists, including Matisse, were in this same place a century ago?

The last time Slimane was here in October to show off his first womenswear collection for the fashion house, the jury was out on whether it was a success. The influential New York Times fashion critic Cathy Horyn thought not, saying it "lacked a new fashion spirit" and that she "expected more from his debut", earning herself a petulant rebuke from the designer and a ban – possibly lifelong – from his runway shows.

Others moaned that Slimane, 44, had usurped the French fashion demigod Yves Saint Laurent by removing his first name from the brand title. This prompted the appearance of T-shirts from an unknown New York fashion group, with the logo: "It ain't Laurent without Yves".

There was a certain historical echo with those artists whose exhibition at the Grand Palais in 1905 was described as "unacceptable" because they used "random gaudy colours", "frenzied brushes" and had turned the place into a "cage of beasts". The bottom line was, however, that like Matisse and his fellow painters, Slimane's collection was popular with the public – or in the designer's case the fashion buyers, who do not part with their money easily – and has been selling well since it hit the rails last month.

Few haute couture houses are as famous as YSL, which ranks along with Dior and Chanel as a French national institution and is considerably greater than the sum of its three letter trademark that Slimane has controversially dumped.

In fact, Slimane, born in 1968 in Paris to a Tunisian father and an Italian mother, is no arriviste but knows the house of Saint Laurent inside out. It was as a young art history graduate that he started helping friends on fashion shows and eventually came to the attention of Pierre Bergé, Yves Saint Laurent's long-term partner, who hired him in 1996 to join the YSL menswear team. He was named the house's chief menswear designer in less than a year.

Fashion critic Suzy Menkes said at the time that Slimane's "sharp eye and scissors" had revolutionised Saint Laurent menswear.

Slimane moved to Christian Dior Homme in 2001 until 2007 when he left to return to his first love, fashion and portrait photography, and completed, among other things, a picture documentary of 18 months in the life of Britain's rock bad boy, Pete Doherty. He was appointed creative director of YSL in 2012, when as well as revamping the logo he moved the fashion house's design HQ to Los Angeles.

Fashion historian Bronwyn Cosgrave said: "Moving the atelier to LA seemed crazy for a venerable Parisian couture house, but this is where the business is these days. Hollywood is the new catwalk, it's the actresses who wear these clothes, so he's in the right zone. Saint Laurent doesn't do couture any more, it is about a different lifestyle, a modern aesthetic, and they had to rebrand."

Surprisingly, dropping Yves's name caused more outrage, but Imran Amed, the founder and editor of the website Business of Fashion, said: "When Yves Saint Laurent first launched his ready-to-wear line it was called Saint Laurent Rive Gauche, so, in a way, this rebranding makes sense. The consumer response is the important thing. In the fashion industry you have to give these things time to play out."

Patricia Romatet, director of studies and consultancy at the French Institute of Fashion, said taking the Yves out of Yves Saint Laurent was far from Slimane imposing his own ego on the fashion house.

"In fact it means it is less not more personalised. It's like when Christian Dior became Dior, or Coco Chanel, Chanel. We're now seeing Saint Laurent as a brand rather than a person."

She said: "Slimane's first collection was been criticised, but it sold, so economically it was successful. Saint Laurent should incarnate a certain Parisien, rive gauche chic, but it needs to become more 21st century. I am confident Hedi Slimane can give the brand a fresh breath of life."

Of course, high fashion is far more than expensive frocks in France, where apart from the contribution it makes to the national economy, it is considered part of the country's heritage.

"It's thanks to the great Parisien fashion houses like Dior, Chanel and YSL that the word 'French' is still synonymous with chic style and luxury," said Alice Rawsthorn, author of Yves Saint Laurent: A Biography.

"The French idolise Yves Saint Laurent as one of the greatest fashion designers of the 20th century but also because he conformed perfectly to the Gallic stereotype of a fragile designer who suffered for his art. He is an impossible act to follow because of the scale of his achievements and his versatility. Other great designers like Balenciaga, Chanel and Dior were known for specific styles and techniques, but Saint Laurent was such a virtuoso that he mastered them all."

Indeed, when Saint Laurent retired from his business in 2002 he declared, "high fashion is finished," and lamented there was nobody left to replace him as the high priest of haute couture.

Paris-based Lucy Pinter, designer of Kate Moss's favourite Superfine denims and credited along with Slimane with the revival of "skinny" jeans, said the Saint Laurent creative director was "a genius – Hedi has always had a great strong signature; the moment you see something he created you say 'that's Hedi'. His body of work is enormous and he does everything from branding, photography, design and that is quite an accomplishment."
guardian.co.uk

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18-04-2013
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18SLIMANE-articleLarge-v2.jpg
Hedi Slimane, the creative director of Yves Saint Laurent,
has introduced a vision for the label that has proved divisive.



Quote:
Mr. Provocative
By Eric Wilson

Hedi Slimane could write a book on how to lose friends and still influence people.

It has been a year since Mr. Slimane, who made his name designing skinny suits for skinny men more than a decade ago, took over as the creative director of Yves Saint Laurent, in what has proved to be the most contentious undertaking of a brand reinvention in recent memory. Every week there is a new uproar, from spats with critics to the relocation of his studio.

The latest, though hardly the biggest, is a series of advertisements in which Mr. Slimane has cast unwholesome rock stars like Courtney Love and Marilyn Manson to represent what was once the most revered fashion house in Paris, synonymous with Catherine Deneuve and Betty Catroux. One image shows Ms. Love, in a spotted fur coat, crawling on the floor. Another is a close-up of Mr. Manson’s brooding face opposite the new name Mr. Slimane has put on the label, “Saint Laurent Paris.”

“Hedi wants to shock,” said Pierre Bergé, the former partner of Mr. Saint Laurent and Mr. Slimane’s biggest champion. Dismissing the criticism that has shadowed the designer’s every move, Mr. Bergé, who no longer has a financial stake in the company but has been front and center for both of Mr. Slimane’s women’s shows, described him as the one true heir to the legacy of Saint Laurent. It is a house, he noted, that has long thrived on creating great controversy, as well as great fashion.

“When you are an artist,” Mr. Bergé said, “you are obliged to shock.”

This, more than anything, Mr. Slimane has done well.

Since he replaced the designer Stefano Pilati in a creative takeover that bordered on a coup, Mr. Slimane, 44, has introduced a vision for Saint Laurent that has been so divisive among critics and retailers that no one can quite be sure whether, in hindsight, it will be seen as brilliant or absurd. Reviews of his first two women’s collections, luxe boho and floppy hats for spring and baby-doll grunge dresses for fall, have ranged from the underwhelming to the scathing. Meanwhile, much of the news coverage about the designer, an elusive figure at best, has centered on his antagonistic relations with newspaper critics and magazine editors, banning some journalists from the shows and challenging the tone of coverage.

Yet store buyers have fallen all over themselves to be the first to stock Mr. Slimane’s designs, which they say have been selling briskly this spring, despite some problems with deliveries.

“We would have liked to have had it sooner,” said one retail chief, who declined to be named because Saint Laurent is a potentially lucrative business.

In assessing whether his first year has been a success, there is little doubt that people are talking about Saint Laurent, even without the participation of Mr. Slimane in the conversation. Since joining the company, he has taken a provocative stance against the fashion system. He has made few comments to reporters, only to acknowledge that his ideas are indeed rooted in music and to rebut criticism that he was being disrespectful when he dropped the word “Yves” from the label, one of his first moves that gave offense.

The new logo and its modified Helvetica font were inspired by the storefront of Mr. Saint Laurent’s ready-to-wear business in the 1960s, called Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. But mostly, his intentions have been anyone’s guess, resulting in passionate debates both for and against Mr. Slimane’s rock-chic sensibility. He declined to be interviewed for this article.

“What is interesting to me is how extreme the reactions are,” said Dirk Standen, the editor in chief of Style.com, which has monitored its readers’ reactions to the show through their online comments. “They are fairly evenly split,” he said, “though possibly slightly more negative than positive. At the end of the day, they are clothes. People could just shrug.”

In a sign of the interest in Mr. Slimane’s shows, Saint Laurent ranked second among the most viewed collections on the site for both the fall and spring seasons, with more than 2.2 million page views for fall, right after Chanel. Before Mr. Slimane, the collection had not previously been in the top 10.

Barneys New York had sold 60 percent of its spring order at full price as of last week, including a $14,000 dress. Jeffrey New York also sold out of several key looks.

“When we were buying the collection,” said Jeffrey Kalinsky, the store’s founder, “I felt like I was seeing dollar signs.”

Bergdorf Goodman is building special departments for Saint Laurent in its men’s and women’s stores, which are expected to be completed this month.

“We’re very eager for the business to be as big as the perception of the brand,” said Joshua Schulman, the president of Bergdorf Goodman.

As is PPR, the luxury conglomerate that owns Saint Laurent and wants to make it as big as its Gucci business. The company, which will be renamed Kering in June, releases its quarterly earnings next week. Mr. Slimane’s fans and detractors alike will be paying close attention to the performance of Saint Laurent, given what is clearly a big investment in the label. They will also be judging the strategy of François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of PPR, to recruit designers who will not only be involved in thecreative side of a label, but in its commercial aspects as well.

To that end, the company plans to open new flagships designed by Mr. Slimane next month in Paris, on the Avenue Montaigne, and in New York, at 80 Greene Street, once the Helmut Lang store, with a sleek amalgam of white-streaked black marble and black-streaked white marble.

FIVE YEARS can be a lifetime in fashion.

Mr. Slimane became known shortly after Mr. Bergé hired him in 1996 to revamp Saint Laurent’s men’s wear. His skinny suits were so successful, they foreshadowed an era of “slim-fit” fashion. But after Saint Laurent was sold to Gucci in 1999 and Tom Ford came into the picture he jumped to Dior Homme. Mr. Slimane went on to become a star there. At the same time, Saint Laurent, with more than 100 licenses, was losing tens of millions of dollars a year. It was not until 2010, six years into the tenure of Mr. Pilati (a former assistant to Mr. Ford who took over in 2004 after Mr. Ford resigned in a creative dispute), that the house again made a substantial profit.

After several years of expanding Dior’s men’s wear, however, Mr. Slimane asked for his own label and demanded too much control. In 2007, he was rebuked by Bernard Arnault, the chairman of LVMH, who told him to come back to reality.

Instead, Mr. Slimane moved to Los Angeles to pursue his interest in photography. And with little explanation he broke ties (some would say he burned bridges) with many of the people who had supported him at the start of his career. Friends who had known him for years were suddenly shut out, or shut him out. Karl Lagerfeld, who included Mr. Slimane in his entourage in Paris, stopped wearing his clothes. Jean-Jacques Picart, the consultant who encouraged Mr. Slimane to become a designer in the first place, said in an e-mail message, “I can’t say anything about Mr. Slimane, and to be very honest, I don’t want to.”

Still, Mr. Slimane coveted the job at Saint Laurent, and, according to those familiar with the negotiations, he encouraged rumors that he would eventually replace Mr. Pilati. Those reports haunted Mr. Pilati for years. Mr. Bergé also became more vocal about his displeasure with its direction after the death of Mr. Saint Laurent in 2008. Mr. Bergé said he never actively campaigned for Mr. Slimane, but when Mr. Pinault finally told him he was giving the job to Mr. Slimane, he was, of course, “very, very happy.”

But when Mr. Slimane returned to Paris, he faced a frosty reception from an industry that has devalued the role of the star designer. Many editors resisted what they saw as diva behavior, like giving only standing tickets to some esteemed guests, from a designer who was still untested in women’s wear. Few could claim to understand his approach when he showed a debut collection at the Grand Palais that looked merely like Mr. Saint Laurent’s greatest hits. Lisa Armstrong, in The Telegraph, wrote that “what was most surprising was that it was so unsurprising.”

At his second women’s show last month, a fall collection that closely resembled Courtney Love’s “kinderwhore” style of baby-doll dresses from the ’90s, some guests openly laughed, dismissing the grunge-era looks as worthy of Topshop, not Saint Laurent.

Those in Mr. Slimane’s camp, however, argue that he is less interested in critical opinion than what is happening with styles among the youth culture of Los Angeles.

“Hedi has a very specific thing he does and that’s why they brought him in,” said the singer Sky Ferreira, who met Mr. Slimane on a photo shoot a few years ago. “When people talk about him changing Saint Laurent, I don’t really see the problem. Because you can actually wear it?”

That is the crux of the argument. In the Saint Laurent showroom, the runway clothes appear well made and priced for a luxury customer. A tartan dress has individually sewn panels of black mesh between what on the runway looked to be simple pleats, and a band of embroidered crystals at the waist. A mohair cardigan is lined with silk. And leather minidresses that looked like nothing in the show are actually made of panels sewn together with seams that trace the Mondrian-inspired lines of a Saint Laurent dress from the ’60s. The sweaters will cost from $1,500 to $2,000; dresses from the spring collection have ranged from $1,990 to $3,990.

FROM PPR’S PERSPECTIVE, Mr. Slimane is doing exactly what the company wants, engaging in the commercial side of the business, including store design, and communicating directly with younger customers online.

Paul Deneve, the chief executive of Saint Laurent, described the change as a “complete overhaul,” from store concepts to shelving.

The remaining question is whether customers will see things differently than the critics.

So what if the reviews were dreadful? This was more or less what Mr. Slimane had expected. Mr. Bergé said that the two had discussed the reactions and compared them to those faced by Mr. Saint Laurent with his famously scandalous 1971 collection, which took inspiration from 1940s flea-market fashion. The groundbreaking fashion critic Eugenia Sheppard described it as “frankly, definitely and completely hideous.”

If Mr. Saint Laurent could survive that, there is hope for Mr. Slimane.
source | nytimes.com

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20-04-2013
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Originally Posted by MissMagAddict View Post
Attachment 660065
Hedi Slimane, the creative director of Yves Saint Laurent,
has introduced a vision for the label that has proved divisive.




source | nytimes.com

That has to be the biggest bullsh*t I've ever read. I think it's stupid how everyone said the Fall show was evocative of the 40's collection. I just can't even go into detail how awful this man is.


(let us not forget that Eric Wilson gave a lukewarm, if not negative review, on the fall show)


Last edited by lepetitcouturier; 20-04-2013 at 12:43 AM.
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30-06-2013
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