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24-12-2005
  151
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fab_fifties_fille

Julian I think your mindset reflects the world at the moment, the walk-away, disposable culture we seem to have...picking things up then casting them off when one is bored, I find it's a very interesting way of working, but I couldn't imagine being able to work that way myself...so it's quite hard to follow.

i think rei kawakubo has the same approach to fashion. that's why she's sitting pretty where she is. the disposability factor is inherent to fashion, and that's why it's incredibly holistic. maybe it comes down to a non-linear thinking (success not in the outcomes, but in the various avenues to get there) which when applied to a frentic industry such as fashion it's probably the healthiest perspective to have. it's not putting all the eggs in one basket, so to speak. ;P

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27-12-2005
  152
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finalfashion
As I was cutting I realized that I could cut a random, irregular shape, freehand, from two layers, rotate one of the layers X degrees and create a random volume for a little bag...
By request, my miniseries of small leather bags.

first, a tennis ball sort of design... ho hum...

Two figure-eight type of shapes, one rotated 90 degrees.

kind of cute...

Two squares, one rotated 45 degrees.

picture doesn't do it justice, and I didn't get a good angle... woops..

Irregular shape twith three odd knobs, one rotated a random twist. Peculiar random volume, very interesting to turn around. I gave it to my aunt

(the machine I did it on, a gift, pre-assembly, 1926 singer leatherworker)

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Last edited by finalfashion; 27-12-2005 at 07:06 PM.
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27-12-2005
  153
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Wow! coolest internet quiz. ever.

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
1) What designer garments really make you FEEL good?
What I make for myself. In my own clothes I can be as extreme as I want.

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
2) Who in fashion do you really hate with a vengeance?
That's hard, Julian, but it's the way that it takes advantage of the people who work in it, from wal-mart employees right up to supermodels it's an industry that tends to eat it's young. It's another rotton corrupt industry like all the rest, and like every industry, there are a fair amount of jerks and deluded people... but there are some extremely awesome people as well. Not everyone is uncaring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
3) What one aspect of the Fashion Industry would you most like advise on or help with understanding?
Why it persists in being old fashioned. Why we are still watching fashion shows? Why there is so little questioning of why things are the way they are? Why still only two seasons? Why work ahead, why not design for right now? Why still excluding, not including?

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
4) What one question might you ask me about who I am/ my life… if you had the courage, were drunk, or if all these other people weren’t listening in?
If you had to pick only one... professor or designer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
6) Which artist/designer would you champion as showing the way forward for new fashion design?
All ways are going forward. Going backwards is going forwards. I'm not sure which is the best way yet. I'll have to see who is still standing after a few years. There are the trends that designers put out there, and then there are the actual trends of what people wear. I find it all interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
7) Post a picture of something you want me to add to/ cut. I’ll post artwork back to you, like the game of ‘Consequences’.
I'm not sure what you mean, but feel free to use the images in the last post if you want

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
8) Seed EACH of the following three lists into the right orders from BEST to WORST: i) London, Paris, Tokyo, New York, Milan ii) Cut, stitching, fabric, label, style iii) fashion, sex, music, food, art.
i) never been to any of these places... can't really rank them.
ii)Cut (which I measure by Fit, an X-factor..)...
fabric (colour, Feel)
style (comfortable, useful, makes me feel good X factor)
stitching (solid, will withstand careless wear and washing)
label (which I always read...)

i)fashion ii)sex iii)art iv)music v)food

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
9) Tell me where I might take (or stick!) my way of thinking/ techniques/ label?
I think a pattern is justified by the final garment, not the reverse, if you get my drift. Sometimes your clothes are just walking patterns, and while interesting does not strike me as something I want to wear. I am more interested in clothing that is more functioning and wearable. That's my personal preference, these days anyways

Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
10) Tell me how we might actually work together to make something AMAZING from this information exchange?
Consider me amazed. Wherever it goes will be interesting.

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28-12-2005
  154
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Happy New Year, everyone.

1) What designer garments really make you FEEL good?
I'm one of those who care more about looking good (i.e., interesting, sexy, unusual) than feeling good. I'd even worn life-strangling corsets.


3) What one aspect of the Fashion Industry would you most like advise on or help with understanding?
Haha..how to make a profit. Seriously, what are new ideas and techniques to explore.

4) What one question might you ask me about who I am/ my life… if you had the courage, were drunk, or if all these other people weren’t listening in?
What are your greatest fears?

7) Post a picture of something you want me to add to/ cut. I’ll post artwork back to you, like the game of ‘Consequences’.

Here are a couple of "challenges" :

a) What can one do to a bolt of kimono silk fabric that measures approx. 30cmx8metres?
b) Make a washable garment that's composed of different materials, not all of them cloth, with chains, jewellery, umbrella pelts, etc. that is part of the construction.


8) Seed EACH of the following three lists into the right orders from BEST to WORST: i) London, Paris, Tokyo, New York, Milan
Paris, London, Tokyo, Milan, New York

ii) Cut, stitching, fabric, label, style
Cut, fabric, stitching, style, label

iii) fashion, sex, music, food, art.
Sex, art, music, food, fashion

9) Tell me where I might take (or stick!) my way of thinking/ techniques/ label?
Go "Freitag", like the Freitag bags...i.e. make it an accessible, affordable customisation service.


Last edited by Zazie; 28-12-2005 at 10:52 PM.
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31-12-2005
  155
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Can I ask 2 questions? Are clothes from Parc des Expositions available for buying by the general public, and if so, where? And what's Sophie's role in that label and what sort of thing does she do?

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01-01-2006
  156
rui
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It is quite incredible that this thread has had the depth of conversation that it holds. I have never heard of the work of NOthing Nothing and Julian sophie. I am so happy I have come to read about and view your work. Im very much inspired more then ever from reading your statements Julian, Thank you for that. Thank you for breaking this boundary of designer=unreachable celebrity by speaking with us here . You are a true artist for sharing your insights and knowledge and speaking to us in this forum.
I have to give my two sense of your demo video here now..
I loved it. I love its content, editing and textures. I am actually in the process of editing a film that was produced at my last collections photo shoot (www.thisoldthing.net ) and I was excited to see your work with film and fashion. It mirrors your talent with cutting and fashion. Your creativness is boundless and your teachings are unique an appreciated. thank you.

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02-01-2006
  157
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simply loved the JULIAN & SOPHIE phase and the hotel room show..
should reply the questionaire soon

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02-01-2006
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rui, the Trompe le Mode collection is very nice.
http://www.thisoldthing.net/tlm.html

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02-01-2006
  159
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Happy 2006 everyone!
Excuse me whilst i offload a load of my responses

How to make Profit?
Profit isn’t so hard to make – but if you want to make a creatively challenging product, you need to remove the costs of your own labour. A creative person often cannot stop themselves putting all their time & energy & skills into making a product, but I cannot afford an employee with such obsessiveness(!) & who isn’t constrained by the projects budget: so I earn my living from outside my brand (teaching, creative direction, show production, etc).
That way my wage/living isn’t linked to the success/failure of my products.
That way I am free to do whatever I have to do without incurring my brand any costs.
Profit rises or falls therefore on how good an idea is, at a particular moment in time.
Being profitable in fashion is as much about finding the right moment in time to launch a product or make a statement, as it is about finding the right product to launch. The two cannot be separated.
The best way to make a consistent profit is to keep your costs low, to spend only what is absolutely necessary, to be resourceful, to not be distracted by praise or criticism, to show only when you want to show, to only make the products that really mean something to you, to limit or refuse orders that destabilize your production capabilities, to think 3 seasons ahead (not 2), and to invest your knowledge & skills in other peoples projects too – preferably those with bigger budgets than your own brand
You have to believe in other peoples success as much as your own.
You cannot limit your thinking/design to only within your own product.
Lastly, to put my cards on the table, I haven’t been made rich being a designer, but I have sustained myself for 13 seasons and had a fantastic time doing so. I don’t plan to ever stop, I do plan to expand & grow, to work with some big companies on projects that interest me, and if I can sustain this all while providing myself with food, shelter & travel then I’m HAPPY
I’m more interested in sustaining Turnover.
There is a lot of money to be made in the fashion entertainment industry, but it doesn’t all have to be channelled into one place... money is fluid, it changes hands, it’s a system, sometimes you lose, sometimes you gain. It’s how you spend it that’s important, not how much you keep of it.
Opening a big shop with lots of advertising budget might be a profitable move for a big retailer, but not if the retail sector happens to be in decline & people are saving/ shopping online for bargains. Nothing is profitable forever, and rarely is something profitable in isolation.

What’s my greatest fear?
Being cured.
Being made normal against my better judgement.
Finding an antidote to my restlessness.

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02-01-2006
  160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finalfashion

If you had to pick only one... professor or designer?

All ways are going forward. Going backwards is going forwards. I'm not sure which is the best way yet. I'll have to see who is still standing after a few years. There are the trends that designers put out there, and then there are the actual trends of what people wear. I find it all interesting.

I think a pattern is justified by the final garment, not the reverse, if you get my drift. Sometimes your clothes are just walking patterns, and while interesting does not strike me as something I want to wear. I am more interested in clothing that is more functioning and wearable. That's my personal preference, these days anyways
Professor or Designer?
Designer… I hate the title of Professor

I like your answers a lot
Though the statement “All ways are going forwards. Going backwards is going Forwards.” is fatalistic, only true by virtue of good fortune, and doesn’t sound like a plan.
I know you mean it in a positive way, because you believe in the future and are being positive & trusting.
Personally, I feel the future has to be designed, made better & changed, because history teaches us that great civilizations both rise & fall. I wouldn’t ever take progress for granted therefore.
You’re right, some of my clothes are walking patterns, in fact I might as well answer all my critics in one fowl swoop: I have had an obsession with cutting, and have in the past made some of my discoveries very central to the style of the garment. In many ways, some of the garments I have made are simply the pattern & nothing else… at least not to me. When you work at a technical level in a highly obsessive way, it is the inside of the garment - the patterns, seams & stitches - that hold your attention. If you are a male designer creating womenswear & have no direct connection with how the garment functions on a practical level, then it’s easy to become self-obsessive & forget to stand backwards. You get to know the garments you make intimately as they slowly construct, and at the last moment just before the lining is closed you kiss goodbye to them & they suddenly becomes finished… but this finished state is not how you recognize them… they becomes products, they are photographed, presented & displayed, they then become an image & people are never really interested in asking how they were actually made. In fashion, most people are more interested in who’s wearing it, what party it is being worn too & how they can get hold of it at sample sale price. Of course I now spend a lot more time with fittings & prototypes, & now spend a lot less time obsessing about the inner workings of the garment, and a lot more time getting to know it as a garment on a girl… but in the past when I was first starting out and for many seasons until quite recently, I was living on the bread line and working on shoe-string budgets, and I didn’t give a damn whether the pattern was over-dominating the garment: of course it was, because THE PATTERN WAS ME… it revealed my thinking, my actions, my hands, my movements, my personality as a designer… frozen within the garment for all to see. Of course I have often made mistakes. If you stick your neck out, experiment & try out new techniques then mistakes are absolutely necessary. I look back at a lot of my old work with embarrassment. You never stop learning. Another thing you must know is that I do not consider myself a ‘good cutter’. I am a fluent cutter, I cut and make things quite instinctively, and I like to try out new things… some of which lead me nowhere. I have to be quite wasteful, make mistakes & take risks, because I am trying to find something. I don’t know exactly what it is, but slowly step-by-step I get closer. My understanding & knowledge grows. I don’t only use my own techniques to make garments, I mix them with traditional skills. The Subtraction Method is only good for making certain garments. But having developed it as a way of working it has changed the way I approach both tailoring and traditional cutting. In some ways it has ruined my concentration, because some forms of cutting do require exactness & respect, and when I work with other cutters I know I frustrate them because they think I don’t care for the rules. I do care & I need to show that I care. Future collections will be more mindful, there will of course be extremity & experimentation, but it will be balanced carefully against what looks good on a girl (I now seek a lot of female advice when I cut womenswear because I need to know how the garment feels, both physically and emotionally), and how the garment shape works with the fabric & textiles. When you are a new designer seeking attention it’s easy to get swept along with the whole carnival of the fashion spectacle, and when your budget is next to nothing & you’re living like a bum you’re more inclined to chuck in everything but the kitchen sink, and not care much for refinement. I now feel a much better designer than I have so far demonstrated, though of course my future work will rise or fall depending on who buys it, who writes about it & how it is received by the fashion world.

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02-01-2006
  161
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travolta
I wish there wasn’t the hierarchy with fashion. It’s incredibly lopsided – all these passionate designers with a lot of fuel and ideas trying to get to that top spot to showcase their vision? It doesn’t make sense to me. I’d love to see a company as large as the Gap turn out

How did you manage to get to a point where you feel the freedom you do?

What is your favorite flower? I bet you love biology. Also, what were you interested in when you were little – like between the ages five to ten?
You are right, it would be good to see someone as large as GAP turn out A-POC/PleatsPlease like garments or mass produce Subtraction Cutting. Why do the really interesting ideas in fashion exist in such isolated pockets/ limited editions out of reach from most consumers? The subtraction cutting method cannot be mass produced in the same way as standard cut garments, because factories tend to favour machinery that cuts through multiple layers of cloth from the outside inwards using rotary & jigsaw type blades… cutting around the perimeter of a garment segment to release it from the waste cloth…. Whereas subtraction cutting utilizes the waste cloth and has shapes & holes punched out from the middle of the cloth… from the inside outwards. Some sort of large scale lazer cutter could be adapted to cut through stacked fabric. The subtraction cutting method I call the ‘tunnel technique’ could fairly easily be digitized in software and the garment simulated, so that you could visualize the possible end result with each manipulation of the pattern. Existing pattern making software could be subverted, and new programmes written. Also, random garments could be generated by altering all the variables.
Link the adapted lazer cutter to the subverted pattern making software and switch to random, and you have a machine for mass producing hardcore sculptural shapes, that no longer requires a designer.
I’ll be safely tucked away in my underground lair by this point stroking my cat, but you can see where I’m going
Technique & imagination leads to technological innovation. We have the ideas, but the machinery & hardware comes at a higher price.
Someone get on the phone & make some calls.. I’d love to talk with GAP’s Design Director/ CEO.
Quick before I offer the cutting machine to Pixar for ‘The Incredibles’ sequel: ‘Edna Mode’ the fashion designer character should be frightening the fashion industry with her superhuman methodology … and it would amuse me to see a cartoon character giving Rei Kawakubo/Galliano/McQueen a run for their money


You ask me how I managed to get to a point where I feel free…
I suppose I have always had a problem with authority. I like to imagine the alternative. I don’t care much about losing my job, losing an order, or losing press by saying or doing something that I think needs to be said or done. That’s not to say I don’t respect people or order… I am very respectful/polite/quiet &spend a long time listening/watching before I make a move. I dislike people who abuse or waste the power/authority they are given, or who become complacent and lack vision.
I am very much attracted to creative people who like me cannot differentiate between performer & audience, artist & producer, teacher & student, product & market, creative & technical… who see themselves on both sides of the equation, or who mix up the binary opposites… on/off, start/finish, left/right, up/down, inside/outside, back/front.
We might not be the right people to ask for directions and wouldn’t get far as bomb disposal experts, but we know exactly where things ought to be, or where instead they may look better

My favourite flower… probably an iris. When I was a kid I was into chemistry, mixing random concoctions, creating reactions, burning things, microscopes, magnifying glasses, insects, history, kings&queens, heredity & lineage, planets, drawing cross-sections of the ocean/houses/boats/submarines, drawing plan views of battle fields, wiring circuitry in completely illogical ways, drawing very detailed objects using pixels/half-tone, dot by dot, climbing trees, football, sprinting, swimming underwater, pretending to be underwater all the time, lying on my bed on my back with my head over the edge imagining the world upside-down, mid-80’s computers, translating musical manuscripts into numerical values & writing them into computer programmes, jumping off rooftops with an umbrella, writing stories, and riding my bike everywhere.
My childhood was very happy, but isn’t particularly relevant to the way I design… it’s a state from which I have evolved, and I don’t reference it in my work. I have a tendency to forget or blank out even the recent past and to concentrate on the future and what I might possibly become. It’s perhaps useful to a historian or biographer to help complete the picture of who I am, but there is too often a tendency to try to make an artist/designers childhood appear mythical. I don’t agree with the notion that creative people retain a child-like perspective. It’s a naïve ideal. Designers are adults, and adults have the ability to be far more wide-eyed, fantastical & idealistic than children… because they become increasingly fearless, self-motivated & reflective. Accepting responsibilities whilst simultaneously being subversive & creatively/intellectually challenging is beyond the capabilities of people who aspire to be childlike. We grow up & then we die. This is probably why I have a problem with authority & the title of ‘Professor’. There’s an assumption that I’ve achieved something and stopped growing/developing.

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02-01-2006
  162
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rui
I have to give my two sense of your demo video here now..
I loved it. I love its content, editing and textures. ...
Thanks Rui… I have just finished editing a 20minute video documentary with Sophie about our work and future design ideas, and i will upload a web version into the videoworks section of our site (www.julianand.com) later this week for TFS folk to download & watch. I’ll give you all the URL when it’s done.

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02-01-2006
  163
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hye Park Lover
Can I ask 2 questions? Are clothes from Parc des Expositions available for buying by the general public, and if so, where? And what's Sophie's role in that label and what sort of thing does she do?
Hi!
No, Parc des Expositions isn’t available to buy at retail level (sorry!)… everything is made for individual people through some personal or random encounter, either as a gift or commission.
There will be a sub-range soon called SEX POSITIONS that will be available for retail, with emphasis on distributing hardcore silhouettes at really affordable prices.

Sophie Cheung collaborates with me on a lot of the projects I do. She’s a hugely talented textile designer/tutor specializing in embroidery & constructed textiles.
Sophie has an amazing eye for detail/colour/style & can tell me in 5 seconds whether whatever it is I’m working on at the time is actually any good or not. She is one of the few people I seek approval from. She is also my girl friend

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02-01-2006
  164
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kathleen fasanel
Well, it's entirely a spatial thing....Julian's work is very very exciting. And absolutely anyone can do it. More so than any other method. Call it improvisational pattern cutting; it works.
Hey Kathleen..

(some thoughts that popped into my head when i read back over some of your & softgrey's quotes)

When I was a student I was inspired by the work of Comme des Garcons, Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, Yoshiki Hishinuma, Vionnet, Christobal Balenciaga, Christian Dior, Caroline Broadhead, Jean-Paul Gaultier and early Galliano. All these people pushed shape & silhouette to the forefront of their design/art. As a student they gave me hope.
I also now like the work of Preen, Bora Aksu and Nicholas Ghesquiere.
A lot of my appreciation for these designers isn’t for what they exactly do, but for what I imagine or misinterpret them doing. I see pictures & garments of their work, and often the picture suggests something to me… a new perspective, a top melting into a skirt, a garment in movement somewhere between two states, a small detail that could be exploded in scale to become an entire garment etc. So the act of looking, examining, inverting, hazarding a guess or rethinking how something might be cut leads to new experiments, mistakes, solutions, possibilities.
A lot of people look at garments that are asymmetrical, twisted and drapey-looking and think they are all the same, or that they all somehow share a similar method of cutting & making.
This of course isn’t true.
There are so many different ways of cutting & making, and so many differences between garment making methodologies.
People may look at what I do & think it’s a bit like Comme des Garcons, or might look at A-POC and draw some comparisons with Subtraction Cutting, but I think the apparent similarities are greatly outnumbered by the actual differences.
There is of course a tendency in contemporary culture to seek similarities, and in fashion particularly to group designers together into referential styles & trends.
Information on how & why a garment is constructed in a particular way from 2D to 3D is not usually a main selling point, so is neither sought nor readily available.
I think most people forget that garments are actually constructed/made. For the majority this isn’t what they see… they see a finished product or an image of a garment on a model/celebrity, and their attention is held by the garments status, not how or why the garment was made.
In order to understand one particular methodology or making system, you often first have to get your head around the basics: how garments & fabric function and are manufactured, what discoveries lead to this particular method, and what previous making systems it references & is built on.
For most people this isn’t why they like clothes in the first place, and if they are fascinated by what they see to the extent that they absolutely must find out how its constructed, then they need to be pretty committed & fanatical to go as far as taking a pair of shears to the garment, cutting it open back to its two dimensional pattern shape, and pondering how the transformation process might possibly have unfolded.

eg.
Within the border of your computer screen is a window.
A window is a programmed space, existing within an application, with all its guts hidden. We move closer towards streamlined, uncluttered, clearer views of the world, with more and more processes concealed from view.
In this equation we see things enhanced & clearer than they often actually are in reality, and know less & less about how we came to see them, or how in fact we saw them before such enhancement.
Behind this we probably know next to nothing about how these words are actually electronically transmitted &displayed, what calculations are being made right now as you ponder scrolling downwards, and who wrote the code that facilitates this process.

There is so much we don’t know about windows & garments, and so much we don’t need to know to appreciate & use them.
Knowledge is built on knowledge, technique on technique, window within window.
But the magic of the process is often deceptively simple, involving short cuts & slight of hand: Whilst you are looking here, something else is happening in the background unseen.

I think this particular phenomenon has greatly motivated subtraction cuttings development and dissemination, because if you are a designer pushing forward construction as an aesthetic, it becomes increasingly necessary to reveal the tricks & demonstrate exactly how & why the garment is made differently in order to drive an interest in unconventionally made things.
But in order to explain this without losing everyone’s attention the method has to be simplified & streamlined. It needs to be demonstrated in a way that anyone can have a go at, and have the scope to be taken in many different directions, with plenty of room for error & experimentation.

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02-01-2006
  165
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julianroberts_00
Happy 2006 everyone!
Excuse me whilst i offload a load of my responses

How to make Profit?
Profit isn’t so hard to make – but if you want to make a creatively challenging product, you need to remove the costs of your own labour. A creative person often cannot stop themselves putting all their time & energy & skills into making a product, but I cannot afford an employee with such obsessiveness(!) & who isn’t constrained by the projects budget: so I earn my living from outside my brand (teaching, creative direction, show production, etc).
That way my wage/living isn’t linked to the success/failure of my products.
That way I am free to do whatever I have to do without incurring my brand any costs.
Profit rises or falls therefore on how good an idea is, at a particular moment in time.
Being profitable in fashion is as much about finding the right moment in time to launch a product or make a statement, as it is about finding the right product to launch. The two cannot be separated.
The best way to make a consistent profit is to keep your costs low, to spend only what is absolutely necessary, to be resourceful, to not be distracted by praise or criticism, to show only when you want to show, to only make the products that really mean something to you, to limit or refuse orders that destabilize your production capabilities, to think 3 seasons ahead (not 2), and to invest your knowledge & skills in other peoples projects too – preferably those with bigger budgets than your own brand
You have to believe in other peoples success as much as your own.
You cannot limit your thinking/design to only within your own product.
Lastly, to put my cards on the table, I haven’t been made rich being a designer, but I have sustained myself for 13 seasons and had a fantastic time doing so. I don’t plan to ever stop, I do plan to expand & grow, to work with some big companies on projects that interest me, and if I can sustain this all while providing myself with food, shelter & travel then I’m HAPPY
I’m more interested in sustaining Turnover.
There is a lot of money to be made in the fashion entertainment industry, but it doesn’t all have to be channelled into one place... money is fluid, it changes hands, it’s a system, sometimes you lose, sometimes you gain. It’s how you spend it that’s important, not how much you keep of it.
Opening a big shop with lots of advertising budget might be a profitable move for a big retailer, but not if the retail sector happens to be in decline & people are saving/ shopping online for bargains. Nothing is profitable forever, and rarely is something profitable in isolation.

What’s my greatest fear?
Being cured.
Being made normal against my better judgement.
Finding an antidote to my restlessness.
so far this is the thing you have said that makes the most sense to me...


hurrah!......

__________________
"It is not money that makes you well dressed: it is understanding."
ChristianDior



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