Maison Margiela Haute Couture S/S 2016 Paris - Page 4 - the Fashion Spot
 
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28-01-2016
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Tim Blanks

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Maison Margiela’s Artisanal collection used to tell stories of a depth and complexity that few other collections could match. There were always fulsome descriptions of each garment, because knowledge enhanced appreciation. The collection John Galliano showed on Wednesday came similarly supported by the written word, to similar effect. It established a remarkable rapport with the essentials of the Maison, at the same time as it clarified what a confident Galliano brings to the party.

It was obvious the show was about The Process of Creation, from the relative restraint of its opening passage to the sensory overload of its finale, the linking conceit being the art of collage. One of the first looks was a white jacket, with an insinuating finger of lamé jacquard tickling at its collarbone. By the end, the lamé had been supersized, with fil coupé and cloqué jacquard, into a pair of giant trousers that were twisted into an evening dress. Galliano has always been a master of the surreal effect. The model looked like she was wearing Versailles.

There were nuggets of familiarity — a neat little military jacket, a vintage “rainforest” t-shirt, a checked wool jacket, a bomber jacket, big like a Margiela classic. Sometimes, they were in bits, hanging on for dear life. Sometimes, there were bits hanging off them, like the double-breasted black wool blazer, which trailed a cloud of pink and orange from one shoulder. Galliano wanted these "everyday archetypes" to heighten the mysterious alchemy of opposites that fired the collection. Nothing less than the mystery of creativity. Helped spectacularly by the hair and makeup, every piece told a story. You were dying for the 24-outfit parade to slow a little so you could listen. But something else Galliano always did well was leave ‘em wanting more.
businessoffashion.com

Bridget Foley
Quote:
The middle ground. The phrase implies compromise and by extension, a dilution of conviction. Yet in today’s reality-obsessed haute landscape, the middle may be the new edge, a creative fault line on which the real and surreal commingle in shameless sartorial glory.

At Maison Margiela, John Galliano has found his own middle, one grounded in self-control rather than compromise. For spring, fashion’s most notorious romantic delivered what from a lesser creative talent might have tanked: a powerful fusion of discipline and ebullience. The results were bold and beautiful.

According to the show notes, Galliano’s spring Artisanal collection was about “exalting the process of haute couture through the construct of collage.” He made the clever choice not to go crazy — at least not all of the time. He started pure, with the blank slate of a white cavalry twill mini trench, subtle in its idiosyncrasy — a horizontal slash high across the back from which the model’s long blonde extensions were pulled into an offbeat ponytail. That trench begat another, in triple georgette, with a high-drama trapeze of pleats in front. As the show progressed, often a jacket looked like a jacket (belted olive drab military jacket with embroidered gold metallic collar) and a dress, like a dress (striped polo dress that morphed on one side into a pretty silk print).

Yet inevitably, such definition morphed into more random pilings as Galliano let loose with the collage motif in grand swathes and poufs — lames, fil coupés, brocades, jacquards — arranged with no apparent reason other than beauty. He tore off one sleeve of what would have been a practical winter coat and tossed a giant spill of blue and gold jacquard down its front. There were moments of abandon via proportion (a moody-broody billowing balloon of a dress in mixed textures of black silk) and shape (a flying buttress explosion of deep blue and metallic gold jacquards referred to on the line list as “a belted coat dress”).

Moments of exquisite indulgence came in an embroidered gold dress tacked onto a laser-cut calfskin cape, and a complicated compilation of metallic jacquard and taffeta with a longhaired fur skirt. So did a mannish oversize black jacket attached (or was it?) to a rustling pink and orange evening gown slung over one arm and worn in back, like a train. A meeting in the middle, with maximum impact.
wwd.com

Alexander Fury
Quote:
I’ve worried that, perhaps, I’ve been caught up in the enthusiasm for John Galliano’s work at Maison Margiela - grateful to have a fashion maverick back creating, perhaps giving him an easy ride for clothing that, ultimately, is neither here (the present, on people’s backs) nor there (an outright ode to the undoubted and enduring influence of Martin Margiela, who retired in 2008). His spring/summer 2016 “Artisanal” collection, however, felt pulse-throbbingly contemporaneous. It was the best he’s delivered since he joined the house in October 2014.

This collection was great because it truly fused Galliano’s sensibility - a magpie eye, with a taste for grand theatrical gestures - with Margiela’s legacy. In the past, they’ve seemed to fight - here they worked together in harmony. Margiela’s “Artisanal” collection was originally based on the notion of the found object, a Dadaist conceit. Here, what Galliano found were the ideological similarities between his work and that of Margiela, and bound them together. A pair of trousers were blown up super scale, but then wrapped into an evening dress; a lamé beaded dress was attached to a laser-cut leather cape; an army parka was compressed, restitched into a fitted jacket.

The final outfit was the best example: Galliano ditched the brides of his previous two shows, the traditional final to a haute couture fashion show, and instead showed a vast bomber-jacket, whose ubiquity suggests them as the garment of the fashion moment. His version was larger-than-life, exploding with multicolored panels of jacquard cloqué. In a simultaneous instant, he recalled the oversized jackets made by Margiela himself (one memorable collection was oversized by various percentages - most 100 per cent or more; the sweeping opera coats of Galliano’s Dior days; and the fresh bombers, after both fashions, by new Parisian label Vetements which is causing such a fashion furore. That was something to remember.
independent.co.uk

Suzy Menkes
Quote:
Step by step, in bold riding boots, the Maison Margiela collection moved forward. First came the blank canvas of white, especially striking in its rendition as a perfectly tailored coat.

Then designer John Galliano shifted towards Artisanal - the range of put-together pieces that Martin Margiela, the house's original designer, had invented as part of his early perception of recycling in the 1980s. For in the Spring/Summer 2016 Haute Couture line, there were fragments of fabric - patterned pieces that could have come from castaway curtains and striped shirts - bunched like clean laundry on the breast of a shirt dress.

Galliano seemed much more assured with this collection, shown with a flourish in noble rooms at the Hôtel National des Invalides. He even inserted a little of that mad make-up from the Dior show years: eyes outlined with a dark star; purple lips painted on the face; and a lot of red hair.

Always the showman, Galliano finished off an impeccable double-breasted jacket with a flurry of pink dress at the back, showing off an orange lining from the front.

The brilliant mixes that Galliano used throughout both his personal and Dior years seemed, for the first time, to fit with the Margiela aesthetic. Yet… we have, indeed, seen all these recycling and remaking stories before. The shirts-on-shirt whispered "Comme des Garçons". Everything seemed like an echo chamber of something in fashion's past.

The real problem with the Artisanal project is that it is a merger of two similar skill sets, but with entirely different fashion spirits. Martin Margiela is from Europe's north, the artistic fashion equivalent of the Flemish painters; while Galliano is intrinsically Mediterranean, with the richness of Spanish or Italian art.

The north/south divide seems present in their separate ways of approaching the concept of recycling: Margiela, a dedicated "green" before that title was invented; Galliano a "magpie" decorator.

The new Artisanal collection, supported financially and emotionally by Renzo Rosso's Only the Brave group, shows Galliano moving towards Margiela's goal. But it remains to be seen whether the merger will finally be sealed in this confused period of changing fashion attitudes and fading haute couture.
vogue.co.uk

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28-01-2016
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continued...

Sarah Mower
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Fashion is a mad, mad, absolutely mad world—and the real world outside has gone even more incredibly insane. So there was something cathartic about watching as bonkers a show as the one John Galliano put on for Maison Margiela’s Artisanal collection—a place where he can be free to channel nonsensicalness and throw fabric around to his heart’s content. Lamé! Glitter! Brocade! Surreal makeup! After a few minutes, you just surrendered, put the anxious rational mind on hold, and let it sweep you along in a delightful way.

Galliano doesn’t appear at his shows or give interviews before or after these days, so you had to use your own eyes to figure out what he was up to. Since he started out with cream-color safari jackets, skirts, and tops with fragments of more luxe couture fabrics draped across them, the references to toiles and studio works-in-progress were quickly signaled. That was an important move, as it subliminally connected Galliano with Martin Margiela himself, whose label was based on questioning the way fashion is made—and making surreal observations, puns, and jokes about it. Since he joined the house, a certain tension has hovered around the issue of how Galliano would mesh with Margiela’s worldview, but with this show, it lifted. The man in charge now has a different sensibility, but it all begins, spontaneously, by looking at a mannequin in a studio and experimenting with all manner of tryouts.

Rush to the end of the show and you’ll see how that led him to great, bunched-up loops and swathes of couture fabric amalgamated with MA-1 jackets—a funny mating of high concept with street. Further back, though, there were really lovely moments: a soft black lamé jacket with velvet pockets, a glittery sliver streak of a midi dress, a cascade of fan pleating gushing down the front of a belted ivory trenchcoat.

Galliano absolutely knows what he’s doing when it comes to cutting and manipulating fabric—he is an old hand. But part of the reason this show felt so light and uplifting is that it didn’t seem that he was covering his old ground, but stepping lightly and playfully into new territory—with, it must be mentioned, a whole collection of brilliant wedge-cum-high-heeled boots that Maison Margiela ought to make available right away.
vogue.com

Vanessa Friedman
Quote:
At least at Maison Margiela, now under the creative directorship of John Galliano, the subject matter was the more conceptually abstract exploration of collage.

From the base of an understated white silk twill safari suit and a trench, he opened seams to expose rough-cut swathes of lamé jacquard; added a front panel of fan-pleated georgette; and otherwise cut-and-pasted fabrics and symbolic garments (the woodsman jacket, the souvenir T-shirt, the military jacket, the banker’s pinstriped shirt) into Comme des Garçons-like combinations of form, if not entirely function.

There were some recognizable pieces — a great belted military jacket in olive twill with a gold collar; a silver lamé velvet dress with inverted seams that formed a spine down the back; some terrific mixed-media riding boots — but by the finale of giant trousers in gold and sapphire lamé, fil coupé, and cloqué jacquard, all twisted together to form an enormous bow on the back of the “dress” or the generous twists of material growing over a satin bomber jacket like an opulent fungus, it felt more like experimentation for the sake of experimentation. Not a challenge to really examine our underlying associations with material and purpose.

New-ish, sure. But ultimately not enough.
nytimes.com

Sarah Harris
Quote:
This season, John Galliano explored the concept of collage for Maison Margiela’s Artisanal collection. The simple exercise of tearing paper and piling up layers, while revealing others, formed the starting point this morning.

It sounds like an easy idea and things started out relatively tame, a belted white suit in wool with a raw-edge silver lamé velvet sash, say, or a dress with a rippling brocade fin at the back, but proceedings soon evolved into a series of looks that were so layered in swooping swathes of brocades and jacquards, it was fun to fathom what exactly was going on. Take a white one-sleeved trench for example that seemed to half-explode with unfurling edges to reveal a teal and gold brocade beneath (rich shades were inspired by the Ottoman sultans of Istanbul’s Topkapi palace), and later, towards the finale, a dramatic evening dress of lamé, fil coupe, and cloque jacquard twisted around the body to spectacular effect, and then you suddenly caught sight of a waistband and realised it was a giant pair of trousers wrapped and contorted.

Unpicking these clothes is half the fun – and there were some familiar sightings; a vintage T-shirt formed the base of one look, so too an oversized bomber jacket (which, by the way, has been noted on almost every couture catwalk to date) and elsewhere, a feathery laser-cut leather skirt. But the art of transformation is a mainstay here, a mannish black blazer might be just that from the front, but turn around and it magically morphs into a billowing tangerine-lined bubblegum pink gown.

It was a feast for the eyes, and the accessories added more layers of exotica. Neo-Victorian "hairwork" jewellery was plaited and looped, hoods were crocheted in Fair Isle knits and embellished with metal studs, while fingers twinkled with gems. If you want to look loaded - in more ways that one - you'll find it here.
vogue.co.uk

Jess Cartner-Morley
Quote:
In the light of Oxfam’s recent report that 62 individuals own as much of the world’s wealth as the poorer half of the global population, the Paris haute couture collections hawking six-figure cocktail dresses embellished with gold leaf or mink trim make a twisted kind of economic sense.

John Galliano’s Maison Margiela Artisanal collection, however, is less easy to explain. It is an official haute couture catwalk show, held in an imposing gallery of the Hotel des Invalides to a tinkly, Parisian cafe-society soundtrack. As with the other shows, the prices are kept discreet, presumably lest word of them should spark a revolution. And yet these are definitively not clothes designed to appeal to the super rich, being as much about rags as they are about riches.

The philosophy of the house founded by Martin Margiela is about unpicking and exposing how fashion works, rather than using it to brandish wealth and power.

“The humble gesture of tearing paper” was the starting point for this show, which started with white skirt suits, each of which had a section torn out and replaced with a different texture: paper, first, then lame velvet. There was an idea here about how a garment takes on the personality and the meaning of the textile it is made of.

Next came contrasts in how fabrics are treated and finished, and how that affects how we read them. So there was neat, close-pleated triple georgette one minute, followed by exquisite jacquard with raw, violently ripped edges, followed by leather hole-punched into delicate mesh. An exquisite dress was draped down the front of a model’s body, cinched with a belt and leaving her legs bare at the back: a ballgown, worn as a worker’s apron. (“Decorative surfaces migrate across utilitarian elements”, according to the show notes.)

Even the faces of the models were fractured. A glossy stencil of a red lipped mouth appeared on one model’s throat, and over another’s eye. The models’ actual mouths, meanwhile, were painted blue or black. Long hair was threaded with feathers and gemstones until it glinted like a magpie’s nest. It was original, strange, and surprisingly beautiful.

The strangest part of all? The sales figures. Revenues at Maison Margiela have increased by 30% in the past year, since the arrival of John Galliano. Renzo Rosso, owner of Diesel as well as Margiela and the man who gave Galliano the job, says that the couture collection is now the engine of growth at the company, defining the image of the house and setting the agenda for other collections. Plans for handbags and a new perfume are in process, CEO Giovanni Pungetti told Womenswear Daily recently.
theguardian.com

Karen Dacre
Quote:
If there is any truth to the idea that a fashion collection reflects the state of mind of its designer, it seems John Galliano has found a happy place.

Unveiling his latest Artisanal collection for Maison Margiela in Paris this morning, Galliano brought joy on a damp January day with a showcase that celebrated the beauty that can be found in everyday things. The result was bonkers but brilliantly so, with everything from bankers shirts to lipstick print riding boots to Ziggy stardust wigs added to the mix. Taking this idea of turning humble gestures into works of art through the processes of haute couture and really running with it, the London reared designer unveiled a jacquard coat dress, worn with a Fair Isle knitted veil, and a navy satin bomber jacket, made special through intertwined pieces of luxurious panels of lame.

The collection was heavy on references; disco boots worn with denim and lace cigarette pants and a flowing silk cape evoked memories of Bowie in the Seventies while the opening sequence of all-ivory ensembles which combined plisse silk and panels crafted from Korean paper suggested the designer had been exploring the idea of construction and 3D techniques. Highlights came via a black calfskin coat, masterfully laser cut to give the impression of scales. A pioneering approach to tailoring which saw ordinary wardrobe staples slashed in half to create conceptual shapes also inspired.

While the notion of turning the mundane into the extraordinary is nothing new for the Margiela house which has long considered the practice as part of its DNA, it is new ground for Galliano whose heyday at Christian Dior is defined by otherworldly opulence.

Galliano’s decision to celebrate the codes and practices of the house which brought him back to the fashion fold following his breakdown and subsequent sacking from Dior, points to a change in tact. Instead of being known for his ego, the man who once strutted his way down the catwalk at the close of his shows was hidden away backstage today. And undoubtedly, is flourishing at the Paris-based Belgian house which prefers its designers to have anonymity in order to let the clothes do the talking.

Following a week in Paris during which a change towards a more collective approach to luxury fashion design has become something of a talking point - notably with the entire Dior team taking a bow at the end of its catwalk show on Monday - Maison Margiela’s model has emerged as being ahead of its time.

Will the other big houses follow suit and allow their star designers to spend more time in the shadows? Undoubtedly, when you see the wonders it has worked on John Galliano, it is a brave new dawn that's difficult to disregard.
standard.co.uk

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28-01-2016
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^^^ Thank you fashion_Girl for all the reviews!

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Originally Posted by Zazie View Post
WOW!! Although this looks more like CdG than MMM to me, this is the first collection I absolutely love from Galliano since his early St Martin deconstructivist days. It's luxe, it's crazy, but BEAUTIFULLY SCHIZOPHRENIC!
Glad you see you back Zazie!

Yes, those Rei/ Comme flourishes have been spotted from his very first collection for Margiela. He clearly adores her, and with his position at MM, I think it’s very fitting and very relevant for John to show her influences in his designs.

The details are crazy stunning to me. I love the direction he's taking this label with.

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28-01-2016
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I've been looking through the collection again and again, thinking that it maybe does a Prada and become amazing after the initial bewilderment, but it just doesn't happen. In fact, what bothers me most is that there's nothing behind the opulence and madness and chaos. This collection seems to exist in a vacuum where it doesn't do anything apart from just 'being there'- it doesn't dress anybody, it doesn't say anything new, it is not shocking in any way- and while I agree that loads of collections don't say anything new or exciting I don't necessarily expect it from them..but this is GALLIANO! for MARGIELA! I expected my life to be changed, not wanting to wear anything else ever again, spending all my hard earned cash on these surely amazing clothes ..instead it leaves me cold. Maybe it's just me, maybe I was expecting too much..but I feel like I had a right to expect much. Oh well

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28-01-2016
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Originally Posted by Lola701 View Post
Margiela wasn't a death couture house waiting for someone to revive it.
Sales were up, yes, for the RTW designed before Galliano. His collection arrived in stores months after his first presentation, so yes! The buzz around Galliano helped Maison Margiela.

His first RTW was too precious, too girly for Margiela. It was almost confusing to see it next to the pre-collection.

IMO, the main problem with John is that he is still working as if he is at a Couture house. Margiela's clients are not the first ladies or conservative women of Dior.
I still find his approach very superficial. Margiela is an opportunity to re-invent himself (like Celine was for Phoebe). He is talented enough to do that but he needs to understand that Margiela means something to people who are buying it. And that new bag he has launched makes me believe that he is not there yet!
Totally agree with you there, I think the buzz around Galliano's return is the reason for that jump. The main thing I felt after this collection was that the brand seems like it will be stuck caught in this tension between Margiela and Galliano as he struggles to make it his own, that's why there's confusion.
and those bags..

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29-01-2016
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^^^ Thank you fashion_Girl for all the reviews!



Glad you see you back Zazie!

Yes, those Rei/ Comme flourishes have been spotted from his very first collection for Margiela. He clearly adores her, and with his position at MM, I think it’s very fitting and very relevant for John to show her influences in his designs.

The details are crazy stunning to me. I love the direction he's taking this label with.
Thanks Phuel, always good to see you on these threads.

Rei's been influenced by John's material eclecticism too, especially in her "collage" collections, but she blew up the proportions. Somehow, JG's love of luxe collage, CdG's irreverent attitude towards volume and MMM's deconstruction end up in this fashion alchemy. I find it intriguing!

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30-01-2016
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Thank you Fashion_Girl22 for all the reviews!

This precious "simplicity" where every detail is particular, is unique... the fabrics collage is the art of fashion. Every Artisanal collection is particular, there are no similar pieces. It's all about creativity and about beauty. IMO .
It can be Maison Martin Margiela by John Galliano or it can John Galliano's Martin Margiela.
There are many wearable pieces - it is too expensive and impossible to buy but the pieces are wearable, the first pieces in white, such this white coat in wool and twill silk or one sleeve coat - only few as example.
From the first moment i felt in love with this collection. From Details till boots.

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31-01-2016
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well---the hair and make up team are clearly riffing on david bowie...
ziggy stardust, etc... (rip)

which i guess makes some sense since this collection is sort of alien and strange...
the cdg influence is awkward and uncomfortable in john's hands...
he's best when he is riffing on vivienne westwood, imo...

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Last edited by softgrey; 31-01-2016 at 11:42 AM.
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02-02-2016
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What's the point of showing a couture collection on the runway when the actual pieces they make for celebrity customers like Mrs. Clooney bear absolutely no resemblance of the direction Galliano is headed on the runway (and mind you, could have just as well been designed while he was still at Dior)?

I liked Matthieu Blazy's work for MMM a lot better than the messy chaos Galliano is doing. I see no global direction where he wants to take Margiela, no clearly defined look or persona that he is speaking to.

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^^^ I liked Matthieu's offerings as well. Although it did get repetitive.

This offering is definitely less accessible than the last one— in face value. I think the first section with all the ivory coats are very strong in traditional wearability, even as is. HC is always about personal modifications anyway, and I think the clientele John attracts is likely not the same one that would go to Armani and Eli Saab, whom are likely more to just go with whatever is presented on the runway.

There are some pieces— the ones that resemble a clothesline or a walking hamper, that are obviously showpieces that enforce the label’s cache. But I’ll take those anyday, as a visual treat, to more pastel embroidered/ bedazzled ballgowns or Versace thigh-baring predictability.

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Matthieu's collections were formulatic and limited to embroidery, reworked pieces from the '20s/'30s etc. but it was interesting. His last Artisanal collection was really touching and I still remember that 'I love you' gown. With Galliano I don't have that feeling, I mean his vision is cool, but it's not as memorable as team's work. The biggest difference between Galliano and Blazy is that Matthieu knew what to do and you could see his vision, it was a very clear message. With John Maison Margiela is getting more and more messy. Every line is so different, menswear, womenswear, bridge collections- nowadays they all have different style. It's so confusing.

This collection isn't really bad, but I'm not crazy about it. I can see some interesting looks and gorgeous detailing, but some looks are like a mess, I mean they could have edited that last part of the show very easily. And really, it's time to wash models' hair and change their make-up, those lips on one model's face and neck were awful.

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