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19-11-2012
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I also remember a time when the Aids-t-shirt (correctly known st "the Positive" t-shirt)...was reasonably priced at 35 dollars.

Margiela intentionally marketed the t-shirt at a reasonable price.....so that it would be more likely that anyone from any income bracket might purchase one...and 100% of the money from the sale of the t-shirt went towards a local Aids-charity.

And..the reason why the t-shirt can't be read by anyone was also intentional, too.

Whenever someone "tried" to read the t-shirt...it was hard to read or understand. It would engage the viewer to ask..."what does your t-shirt say??."

The subject of the t-shirt is about the Aids epidemic...a subject that too many people don't want to talk about.

Why didn't H&M market the Aids t-shirt in the collection?? It's always been a Margiela staple in all of HIS collections??

Considering that all the profits from the shirt are intended to be donated to charity...I wonder why H&M company didn't follow Margiela's example??

I'm not actually looking for an answer to my question...I'm being sacastic.

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19-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by margielamike2004 View Post
But.....there is also another perspective to look upon, too.

Without coming across as snooty.....Margiela's pieces were exclusively found at high-end boutiques simply b/c...within a high-end boutique atmosphere...there will typically be a die-hard fashion clientele. Not ALL of the customers.....but several of them...looked upon fashion as a major priority to them.

Other people look upon clothing as merely...a necessity.

Margiela was never easy to understand....and it always took a very unique breed of client to appreciate his pieces.

People with other priorities would find it too bizarre to actually want to wear a dress...or a trenchcoat....with 2 halves that don't match, intentionally. They would look upon it as absurd...or ridiculous. They are more inclined to wear something more classic....and less thought provoking. They wear clothing...not "concepts" of fashion.

In other words...placing a Margiela piece within the confines of a mass-market department store...simply wouldn't sell, presumably.

Everyone has different priorities.

Some people will think nothing of spending 30 grand for an automobile....or hundreds of dollars for music....but because of "priority"...these same customers would never spend 400 dollars, on a black dress. Clothing and fashion are of no concern, to them.
I do admire his womenswear immensely. His menswear is rather forgettable.

Martin's one-of-a-kind type designs I find interesting and covetable-- very charming, but not pretentious at all. And many of Martin's amazingly-structured pieces are deserving of their high prices, of course, I don't mean to give the impression his designs aren't deserving of designer pricing. I just mean that certain pieces; the fusion pieces, white-painted pieces... are very much about the spirit of sustainability, do-it-yourself, and individuality, that having it "already-made" for you-- comes off like an extreme caricatures of the fashion victim accoutrements, to me. It's like buying already ripped and shredded jeans for thousands of dollars. It's buying a false sense of individuality. It's the essence of phoneyness.

Now, I'm aware there are people who genuinely appreciate creativity, but aren't creative themselves, so they rely on others to help them express their love of being creative. But, it's still phoney to me. I can't sew to save my life, but I still alter designer pieces by adding something new to it with the help of a great tailor. I would respect someone so much more if they "infused" pieces themselves, making it their own. I can't help but think unless it has the MMM label on it, some people just won't wear it.

Strangely, I find the H&M versions of the fusion-pieces much less fashion-victim-y: They're inexpensive, more along the lines of a knock-off, just fun and not about a statement since they're mass-produced. It also turns Martin's concept and intentions for these pieces into a novelty, since I can't see anyone wearing them without getting bored of them quickly.

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19-11-2012
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H&M have an entire line each year dedicated to raising money for aids charities don't they? Fashion Against Aids.

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19-11-2012
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Great post, Pheul.

Well?? I definitely agree with you that MMM collections for men are considerably tame, boring, and forgettable....but....that statement can also be applied to ANY designer who presents a woman's collection and a men's collection under their label.

Why, you may ask??

If you look throught the history of men's fashion...especially after the 1930's.....fashion for men hasn't changed much, considerably. Fashion for men hasn't progressed....and it also hasn't re-gressed. Since the 30's, it has stayed...the same.

Proportions and volume in construction might change....such as the ultra baggy suit during the 1980's...or the ultra slender suit you might find from prior collections from Dior Homme (Hedi Slimane's direction...not Chris Van Asche)...but...the presentation of men's wear has remained stagnant.

Fashion has (more-or-less) been left into the hands of women to experiment with. With women's wear...the creativity and the room for experimentation are boundless.

Much of this has much to do with the roles we are expected to live up to, by society....as men and women.

A woman can wear a men's 3 piece suit...with a necktie...and she is looked upon as being "socially acceptable" by society. Keep in mind she is wearing head-to-toe menswear.

But...on the flip side..if we apply the same equation...a man is a dress would be made fun of and deemed inappropriate.

It's a very sexist perspective.

In some regards (although very few will admit it)....men are the gender who is more important. Women are merely 2nd class citizens. It's okay if a girl desires to be boyish...but not okay if a boy desires to be girlish. In essence...the unsaid statement is..."you were born a man...why would you want to degrade your importance in life by wanting to be a woman??"

It's not something that I personally believe...but it is a generalization and one point of view.

As far as fashion for men....they are incredibly limited....and the majority of men tend to also be...quite conservative. Men can also be very restricted to certain colors that are not considered as socially acceptable.

A man can wear a black suit....and he is looked upon as being socially acceptable....but by merely changing the same suit...into a different color lets say bright yellow, for instance...he would most likely become a mockery. It's the SAME suit....ONLY THE COLOR...has been changed.

Bright colors and wild patterns hold memory.

A lady will be remembered by something she wore because of it's color...or for it's pattern (polka-dots, for instance)......men tend to want to fade into the background, more. Case in point?? A man might wear a paisley necktie to be remembered...but....if he likes the paisley tie....why wouldn't he wear a paisley sport-coat, instead.

In my opinion...ALL of most mens wear is forgettable...not just Margiela.

One of the few exceptions that does come to mind is Comme Des Garcons Homme Plus....but I don't see the majority of men wearing her collections. It's always been a brand that has never been for the meek-at-heart.

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19-11-2012
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@HONEYCOMBCHILD.......

even MORE of a reason to add a charity piece.

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19-11-2012
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@PHEUL

I think the subject you're reaching upon....in consideration of what you do to your clothes and your style is......customization.

I'm VERY much into that concept, myself.

Considering that I do sew...I perform my own alterations...but I also will either add something to a garment...or remove it.

Some people would look upon customizing a piece...especially a designer piece...as destroying the garment..or killing it's original integrity.

I have an old Helmut Lang green parka-jacket with a white (fake) fur trim around the hood. During it's time of release...it was quite a popular item.

I took the parka jacket....and painted on the backside (with Elmer's glue)...the words "Nothing Is Real, Everything Is Permitted." I then took black diamond-dust and sprinkled it onto the glue. When everything dried...it gave the quote lots of sparle and glimmer....LOL

Someone on the street recognized the Helmut Land parka and saw what I had done it to. They said, I destroyed it.

To others, they thought it was brilliant....and made the piece "unique" in my own personal way.

As the saying goes...everything is always open to interpretation.

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19-11-2012
  502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by margielamike2004 View Post
You're absolutely correct, Scott. The collection is a bit too idiosyncratic for standard H&M clientele.

I remember a few years ago, I was strolling through the H&M here in Boston...and I was wearing a pair of MM over-sized fold-over pants with an MM Aids T-shirt and the hair-necklace...and the peeps shopping there were snickering at me. I also had on a pair of 900 dollar Carpe Diem boots.

As I stepped outside...I smirked and said to myself....they must all assume I'm homeless, while what I'm wearing and what it cost me could feed a large family in a 3rd world country!! Jeesh...LOL
hahaha

but I'll say it obv isn't because it is almost completely sold out, I coundn't get my hands on that oversized jeans, and I checked it two days after openning.

and I completely agree with ur other posts, no need for quoting.

I wonder what is he thinking right now about all this hype.

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19-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honeycombchild View Post
I only just realized the shearling jacket isn't actually shearling, it's fake!

How can it be suede and yet be 70% polyester?
The inner part is actually suede. It looked GORGEOUS! One of the best pieces from the mens line. But its too bad they didn't use actual shearling fur only the suede glued with polyester mush...

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19-11-2012
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Michigan ave in Chicago had WAYYY too much!
The workers told me that they expected about 3,000 people to show up and only about 300 showed up. Literally 6 pieces of each thing was there and the associate told me they had way more in the stockroom. The accessories were all there too. Many shoes, jewelry, and bags for both women and men.

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19-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pen6693 View Post
Michigan ave in Chicago had WAYYY too much!
The workers told me that they expected about 3,000 people to show up and only about 300 showed up. Literally 6 pieces of each thing was there and the associate told me they had way more in the stockroom. The accessories were all there too. Many shoes, jewelry, and bags for both women and men.
Yikes.

Based on the past collaborations, does anyone know if the leftover merchandise goes on sale. Also, is the sale price dramatically low compared to the original price or just a small deduction?

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19-11-2012
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Visiting Vegas and there are tons of merchandise here. They have everything but the body suits, sneakers and candy bags. It looks untouched honestly.

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20-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phuel View Post
I do admire his womenswear immensely. His menswear is rather forgettable.

Martin's one-of-a-kind type designs I find interesting and covetable-- very charming, but not pretentious at all. And many of Martin's amazingly-structured pieces are deserving of their high prices, of course, I don't mean to give the impression his designs aren't deserving of designer pricing. I just mean that certain pieces; the fusion pieces, white-painted pieces... are very much about the spirit of sustainability, do-it-yourself, and individuality, that having it "already-made" for you-- comes off like an extreme caricatures of the fashion victim accoutrements, to me. It's like buying already ripped and shredded jeans for thousands of dollars. It's buying a false sense of individuality. It's the essence of phoneyness.

Now, I'm aware there are people who genuinely appreciate creativity, but aren't creative themselves, so they rely on others to help them express their love of being creative. But, it's still phoney to me. I can't sew to save my life, but I still alter designer pieces by adding something new to it with the help of a great tailor. I would respect someone so much more if they "infused" pieces themselves, making it their own. I can't help but think unless it has the MMM label on it, some people just won't wear it.

Strangely, I find the H&M versions of the fusion-pieces much less fashion-victim-y: They're inexpensive, more along the lines of a knock-off, just fun and not about a statement since they're mass-produced. It also turns Martin's concept and intentions for these pieces into a novelty, since I can't see anyone wearing them without getting bored of them quickly.

When Margiela presented the painted garments....it was very much along the lines of being within the Margiela esthetic.

I agree that the painted garments are very much DIY (obviously)....and also very "made for you" pieces. I do know that his painted garments are hand painted...but I also know that the garments that have been painted, are also baked in an oven, afterwards. No joke. I'm not sure if H&M repeated the same procedure.

Besides merely being painted....there is also a subtle MMM philosophy behind the painted pieces.

First, Margiela has always loved the history and age of garments. That can be seen in his reproduction series....and also to other collections where he re-worked vintage costumes from the 18th century in a prior collection.

Basically....by coating a garment with white paint (his signature color)...the underlying history of the garment has been erased. For instance...if a pair of blue jeans had been dirtied or stained by a prior owner... painting the garment white would more-or-less bring the garment back to it's "new and pristine" condition...very much like breathing a "new" life back into the garment. The new owner of the white painted garment could give the piece it's own history by being dirtied, and re-worn, again.

It's very much like starting something old, anew.

Much like erasing a garments prior history....being worn, dirtied, etc...and starting it's history all over again. The use of white paint was wisely chosen. White doesn't take very long to get dirty when worn.

Also...the paint has a tendency to unavoidably chip and flake-off with wear....especially within the creases and folds of the garment when worn. This painting process gives the garment a certain patina.

The process reminds me of a piece of furniture that has been painted....or coated with a veneer. Through time, age, and use...the varnish....or the paint on the wood...will scuff, show smudges, flake off in certain areas, etc. What can be seen is the "history" on the furniture from being used....also referred to as its "patina"....much like a pair of jeans, painted white.

As I stated....the painted pieces are incredibly DIY.....but I also think it was the concept of "renewal" Margiela was trying to demonstrate.

Although, I do own a few MMM pieces that have been painted a different color other than white, too.

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20-11-2012
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Without coming across as superior to anybody...or pretentious

I think the reason why I personally understand Margiela.....and the pieces within the H&M collection is b/c I understand the "history" of MMM.

I've been following him since the start of his career in 1989.

Which is one of the reasons why when I look through the look-book from H&M....I get the sense of nostalgia (history) from many of the pieces. I remember the time...and the concept Margiela had....behind every piece.

The H&M collaboration is very much like seeing a retrospective of Margiela's collections, through time.

Many people who are buying the Margiela pieces from H&M obviously appreciate them...but I'm not certain if they understand the philosophy and the commentary that Margiela was trying to make through those pieces he once made.

I don't think that anybody "needs" to understand a garment before they decide to purchase or wear a piece....there is nothing wrong with merely liking a garment and putting it on.

But....fashion is very much like art, in my opinion. Without using words....it's trying to say something to you...about life...about the world we live in. Basically, it's trying to tell you a story. About the past...the current state of affairs...and the future.

Many of the pieces Margiela made were based upon the outlook that we all are currently living in a very disposable society. We wear things...we buy things....and through time, boredom, and exhaustion...we merely throw something away. Something that once brought us joy....merely becomes garbage.

By taking things that were considered as junk....Margiela added or removed his own personal touch to what he made. He took something old...and made it new again.

That is just one Margiela philosophy to touch upon...but there are many others, too.

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20-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LagerfeldBoy View Post
Yikes.

Based on the past collaborations, does anyone know if the leftover merchandise goes on sale. Also, is the sale price dramatically low compared to the original price or just a small deduction?
It gets re-priced first, probably around three weeks after it launched. It wont look like any of the garments have gone into sale as they just change all barcodes with the new lower prices - I believe it's usually around 30% off original, but sometimes if the piece hasn't done too well it has been more like 50%. After being repriced for a while they'll drop into the sale. I reckon they'll be in sale by Christmas time personally.

Even Lanvin had some repricing and that almost entirely sold out, it's just to make sure it clears. There does seem to be more of Margiela left though. When Comme launched they had a lot left, so much in fact it got filtered out to hundreds of stores in little bits for them to work into their main departments, the same could happen here.

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20-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LagerfeldBoy View Post
Yikes.

Based on the past collaborations, does anyone know if the leftover merchandise goes on sale. Also, is the sale price dramatically low compared to the original price or just a small deduction?
it depends on what local store you have. in my store the designer items dont usually go on sale. (they havent since the stella mccartney collaboration) they ship the remaining stock to a NYC flagship store that has a lot more tourists and more foot traffic where the collection sells better. (the collection goes on sale there)

i'm not sure what they are going to do this time. they have a lot of stock all over the country.

the problem is i think not a lot of people planned to try to shop the collaboration due H&M orchestrating immediate sell outs with limited stock in the past. i think a lot of people like me dont bother waiting in line in the cold or getting their hopes up.

at least thats why i didnt plan on shopping the collection previously - because i figured it would sell out immediately - no use getting disappointed like i have in the past.

i only happened to stop by the store randomly to give it a chance.

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